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Until you have an offer, you don't have the job. I understand that when things go well, it's easy to think "This job is mine !", but something can always come up. Maybe you were great, but the next person they interviewed was even an even better fit. Maybe that person had an extra year of experience and that was made their decision. Maybe there's not another ...


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My advice to you is to ignore any potential confusion of the past and instead look at the employment conditions offer, and you should decide on this. Hiring can be a messy business, and yes, often people will be considered for different roles. I think provided that they showed you respect, that's the most important thing when it comes to the process itself. ...


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You're clearly a great resource for your colleagues. Here are some ideas of how to protect time for yourself while being respectful of the needs of your colleagues: Talk to colleagues that demand an exceptional amount of your time. Let them know you are glad you can be helpful, are always available for challenging problems, but encourage them to engage ...


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Appointment based scheduling is a tool of managing the chaos. I caution against making it the basis of doing so. Requiring someone to fill out a ticket or schedule time may make perfect sense, but ultimately is somewhat off-putting nonetheless. You’re moving into more of a soft skill role. Try to keep in mind how any action, no matter how reasonable, ...


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It depends on what kind of help is required on your part. Is it teaching new hires how the system works or is it just that you're more experienced and knowledgeable than your colleagues? In the first case you should have your manager know that some of your time will be dedicated to teaching and thus reduce your load or extend your deadlines. In the second ...


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