New answers tagged

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Considering that this is your first job, I would embrace the feedback (as they say, feedback is a gift!) and use it as an opportunity to be more aware of your strengths and weaknesses at this very early stage in your career. As the other answers state, the communication skills feedback could be due to a variety of reasons - 2nd language, manager expectations,...


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A story my father told when he was taking an intensive foreign-language course for his job: When he was just starting out people said "you speak so well!" As his skills developed, people said "What? That's wrong!" So, it's good to be at the stage where people give you that sort of advice. There's a reason lots of job descriptions call for "excellent ...


10

I understand that you're disappointed you didn't get the position - and I can sympathize but you're looking at this from the wrong angle. As things stand now it's a done deal, you didn't get the job and refusing to help the incoming manager get their bearings isn't going to change that. You won't suddenly get offered the job if they can't perform - in fact ...


7

I do not want to give all my experience and know-how away and teach him from scratch all the things. You can't give away experience. Experience is a matter of reflection of the past. You can however use your experience to be valuable in this situation. Show that you're capable of transferring your knowledge to help your new boss avoid common pitfalls. ...


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The world isn't fair. Some people get the job (or get promoted over you) for a myriad of reasons, from being more skilled in something that is necessary for the position, to being better than you at kissing ass. Sure, the guy has absolutely no clue on how whatever you do works. But why are you so sure that this is the most important skill for this position? ...


4

If these courses are generic, and the learnings from them are the general expectation for your role you are applying for, I would advice not listing them directly as it creates fluff in the resume and the hiring manager may end up missing other important details. Instead, you can use keywords from the courses in your objective statement, and at other places ...


4

In your specific case, I don't think you are "starved for space" so I would want to challenge that assumption. You have enough information for potentially 1.5 pages or so (I'm assuming from your possible option to "expand CV to 2 pages"). 2 pages is an acceptable length for a resume/CV if you have enough information to include there which isn't just a dump ...


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Why Not Both? Build projects that demonstrate principles. Also, this is a nifty link for resumes. I found it to be a good place to start when thinking about resumes. I would also add an "Achievements" section, for whatever work you have done that mattered.


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Focus on both! No two jobs you will be applying for will ever be the same. As the Job Description calls for it let one or the other shine. And as you go through your career you will have more choices to make, in regards to what skills, methods and strategies you are familiar with and capable of using. Tips: Focus on relevant projects, key words, and tools ...


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