275

Obviously you should get legal advice or at least advice from an HR consultant. I think that's what should happen first. But I think you're coming at this from the wrong side. You state repeatedly that he's a good employee. So why are you going to let a customer dictate internal policy? Unless he's an actual representative of the company, i.e. he gives ...


197

I have kept my Facebook profile private at all times. There's nothing unprofessional about it. Facebook to me is my social life, outside of work. It is also the reason I don't accept Facebook requests from colleagues. For professional networking, I use LinkedIn. Any company that wants to know what I do in my spare time and judges me on that, is not a ...


190

What exactly would be the point of that? It makes it look like you have something to hide. If you don’t have Facebook, what is the value of drawing attention to that? Others may be different, but I would see that and spend extra time Googling you as it would make me suspicious. A sticker/icon is usually out of place on a resume anyway.


182

This is a big red flag. If it's really integral to their internal communications then they would have it organised and would give you an account to use. Just the fact that it's in use is a flag, but requiring your personal one sets the flag on fire.


155

In the article you posted it says "57% of employers will NOT interview someone without a social media presence." Yet in the survey it links to it says "57 percent are less likely to interview a candidate they can't find online". It also says "54 percent have decided not to hire a candidate based on their social media profiles". So you could argue that not ...


124

Just make a new account. It's Facebook's Terms of Service for goodness' sake, it's not a big deal. You'll probably only use it at work, and you should definitely not be on Facebook at work if you're posting crap, so it's unlikely that anyone will notice. If you only use it at work, for work purposes, then there is no way for them to connect you to the ...


113

Promoting the company on your personal accounts, without disclosure that you're an employee, is called Astroturfing. It's a good way to annoy your real friends and family and it may cause some people to eye anything you post with skepticism (they may think you have a "money making angle"). It might even be a violation of Facebook's Terms of Service. It's ...


109

This is a bad idea. It could go horribly wrong - they are making a mistake. For example, if people lie and exaggerate, there are now officially sanctioned lies about the company in the social media space. They might even misrepresent a product, potentially breaking the law. If people feel obliged to do it and produce a large volume of low quality tweets, ...


109

Can online activism hurt my employability? Absolutely. But it's largely impossible to predict to what extent. Public activism, whether online or not, can negatively affect your profile as a job candidate. Supporting a controversial topic (such as NAMBLA) would get you rejected from most jobs. Supporting movements with controversial methods (like Antifa) ...


108

Your resume is your sales tool. It's a 1-2 page summary of everything that's good or impressive about you that means an employer may want to hire you. Everything that goes on that resume should be examined in light of the above. So unless you seriously think you're applying to an organisation who would view the fact you don't have Facebook extremely ...


102

A friend of mine told me that hiding stuff from Facebook may imply that I have something to hide, which is not a positive sign for the human resource department. With all due respect, your friend has no clue what he's talking about. To a very large extent, HR doesn't care what you do when you're out of work, so long as it can't be connected back to the ...


77

"10 years experience with blahblahblah. Also, I'm not a bank robber." If you're not on social media then don't mention it at all. If it comes up then simply say "I'm not on social media."


68

The only way to proceed is to look for another job. You know your manager wants you gone. Usually, such wishes are supported by a company. There's nothing to report to HR, because a manager deciding an underling should be fired is part of their job. There's nothing wrong with that, even if you don't like it. There's also nothing to report to HR because ...


67

American by the way here. No, you are fine. And I don't think most employers look you up on social media; you aren't that interesting. Most companies run a background check to ensure you are suitable to work there. Background checks cover things like criminal background and debt (things you can't hide readily), but could be more in-depth depending on the ...


67

I'm assuming you are taking this agreement to a lawyer before signing, right? This is a business and employment contract, and this no-LinkedIn clause is a built-in provision which will allow them to sue you for money damages in perpetuity - that means that by the wording of the contract they can sue you on your deathbed if they claim you EVER re-activated ...


65

You apologize, you assure your lead that it won't happen again, and then you make sure it doesn't happen again. And, as suggested by MattP, your apology should make it clear that you have removed the negative tweets If there were going to be any direct and immediate consequences (e.g. if you were going to be fired for these negative tweets), it probably ...


54

Should I take it up to HR? Assuming I'd want to fight this, how should I proceed? This is very much up to you. Since they already told you Its "not up for discussion", and that "If I don't, it won't be good for you". however, I'm not sure what you should expect (you don't work for the mafia do you?). The best place I see this going is that you ask them ...


49

I think the answer depends on what code is visible in the video. If it's a "Hello, World!" type fragment, some loop that's meaningless without larger context, or an implementation of a simple standard algorithm like linked list etc., I would not consider it to be a big deal; Stack Overflow is full of such code and no harm is done. Simply speak to ...


48

Send back an objection. Let your employer know that your LinkedIn account is NOT a company LinkedIn account, that it's your personal LinkedIn account, and that you are using your personal LinkedIn account as a vital tool in your job search. Offer, as a reasonable way to resolve the issue, to have him review the content of your LinkedIn account for anything ...


43

How do I address this issue? If the employee is doing a good job, which you state they are in your question, I don't think there is anything you can do about this without exposing yourself to a serious lawsuit. He does a great job and I have never had any issues with him at work. On top of that, whatever political group your employee is involved in ...


42

You absolutely must not use your personal account for any such things. Under no circumstances. It is dishonest. If they “raise awareness” by dishonesty, then their goals are compromised from the start.


41

I'd suggest maintaining two accounts: a personal one for things that interest you that might be work-inappropriate, and a second work-related one for things that are always work safe. If need be you can even protect your personal account. There's no reason not to follow many / most of the same people with both accounts. This is my personal approach to ...


39

First of all, let me tell you online presence IS NOT THE SAME AS social media presence. I cannot certify / discard the authenticity and applicability of a(ny) specific post (the article, not the survey) found on internet, but given the practical experience, I'd say, it really does not matter much if you do not have social media presence. Yes, it's ...


38

My advice would be to just remove the reference and not make a big deal out of it, and if anything simply reply stating that you apologise, that you meant no harm, and ask what about the reference was not acceptable so as to prevent such a thing from occurring again. The response might be reasonable, it might not be, but even if it is unreasonable, if your ...


31

How would this be seen by employers? Somewhere between quirky and outright negatively. Neither is good when you're trying to find a new job. Is this unprofessional? Yes. What's unprofessional isn't the type of statement you're making. It's that you're making one at all. It's just Not Done. The only message a resume should convey is how you are the ...


30

If you both want and don't want to contribute, you can just retweet / reblog / re-whatever the company's posts. If the company twitter account announces something, you can retweet it, and everyone is happy.


29

Our company has started to encourage this as well, with groups of people effectively asked if they want to volunteer to become ambassadors for the brand. So far it looks to be done well, and at it's core, the success of the initiative is from the following: These ambassadors get social media training, so they learn how to make posts that aren't blatant ...


29

"the group uses Facebook for their ongoing communication, coordination, and other development (i.e. scrum)." IMO using Facebook for work communications isn't very professional and I can see why you are not keen. However, it sounds like your employer is entrenched in the system and doesn't want to migrate to a different one. I don't think you have many ...


28

the things we are working on. This is already a bad idea. I'd assumed that any content on my personal blog post won't be under this purview. Uhm, no. This is not how real life works. If you write on your personal blog how you hate cats and if your boss loves cats, he might decide to renew the contract of the co-worker who loves cats, instead of yours....


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