New answers tagged

-1

I suggest that you get plenty of sleep, before you go to the Christmas party. Because a recent research study has found that inadequate sleep makes people more anxious. Deep sleep can rewire the anxious brain The authors of this study speculate that many people might not need anti-anxiety medications, if they just get enough sleep every night. ...


3

I've joined purely because I think these answers skip over how serious this is for you. I went through a phase of panic attacks at machines that people queue up for (cash machines, self-service checkouts, ticket machines, etc.). At that point, I could not even get my card in the machine because you lose all physical control and can start shaking in a very ...


0

I think that anything that you do to attempt to change the current system is going to cause them to view you as the weird guy. In my opinion, you should choose either to go with the group, fit in as much as possible, and get the benefits of going out with the group, or alternatively just not participate. You are (were, four years ago) the new guy and based ...


2

It's just another night, you're not the first or last to feel this way. This is perhaps straying too far into Interpersonal.SE territory, but as someone who suffers anxiety and similarly had panic attacks at their first work Christmas Party (and team day out, and company bus trip to the cinema, and team lunch, and performance review meeting...) - the best ...


3

If it's giving you this much anxiety perhaps it is smart to announce you are not going. They might be able to cancel the food that was ordered for you. You did not specify when the party is, but if it's for example 21 December, you would have to remain in this state of panic and fear for almost 2 weeks. And I doubt that's good for your mental health.


7

I think this will be a fine opportunity to "break the ice" and start getting better acquainted with your fellow workers. I suggest you consider going. I know that this may be easier said than done, but I encourage you to make an effort and try to go and socialize and meet new people. No need to have a "smart" or "witty" topic of conversation, just be ...


24

Why not use this opportunity to make some more acquaintance and friends? Don't outright reject the idea of attending the party - Go ahead, give it a try. What's the worst that can happen - that you'll have no new acquaintance - same as now? However, look at the bright side - you may actually find out some like-minded colleagues which whom you can start ...


6

Go! Ahead of time, ask somebody you know in the company to introduce you to a few people. Making these introductions is one of the jobs of supervisors. Then say, "what do you do?" Then listen. People love to talk about themselves, and they won't notice you're anxious. Seriously. You don't have to stay long. You don't have to make excuses for not ...


3

The company I work for has some remote parts and I heard about a few things in a presentation by a full remote software engineer. Here are some things you can do: Maintain contact with your friends, maybe meet them some time for lunch. Hobbies are a nice way to expand your circle of friends. Work outside more often, in cafes for example. If you're a regular ...


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