246

You know what? I'll do the frame challenge answer and say, Don't Tuck Tail. Oh, don't get me wrong. You're going to get blamed a bit, and possibly thrown under a bus. But trying to flee and find another job before the hammer falls without defending yourself is a terrible proposition. Instead, stand tall, stand firm, and say: "I was not given the go-...


218

You should be focused on a lifeboat for yourself Someone promoted you to lead a project with just 5 days remaining which is an absolute disaster? With only 5 days, it seems that they should have chosen an interim leader from the team itself. Unless they informed you of all these problems ( mostly interns, Unity license issues, and the exceedingly high ...


196

In my experience bugs are a consequence of (in no particular order): Poorly defined or constantly changing requirements. Too much work for the amount of time provided, which leads to rushing, which leads to mistakes, and insufficient time to test and fix defects before release. Lack of peer code reviews (may be related to point 2). Insufficient QA ...


193

I agree with Richard that you failed the first question, but I think you failed it in the opposite way. My experience comes from working on government contracts, so this answer is influenced heavily by how those clients and contracts work. This may not apply outside of that. In my opinion, the first question is asking how you will deal with a potential ...


110

This guy should be your role model. Buy him lunch and pick his brain! Seriously, though. There is no shame in learning from younger co-workers. (most people start out as 1 year contracted temps) Your company sounds pretty bad. It usually only takes 3 to 6 months to find out if someone is a good fit. Sometimes, it takes even less. Don't blame the new ...


75

What would be the downsides of having a “you break it, you fix it” policy in the dev team with the goal of reducing bugs? The downside is that you may spend a lot of time trying to chase down who introduced the bug, which in turn could lead to a "blame culture". There is a tactical way to address this situation right now and there is a longer term strategy ...


72

I would be very reluctant to do a job which was mostly maintenance. Here is why: It is bad for one’s career (internally). Heroic efforts to keep software working are almost never recognized as people only see the status quo. Someone who stayed up all night to complete a new feature will receive a lot of praise. Someone who did it to keep the software from ...


72

Let's back up a second. I’m a software coordinator who leads a Scrum team What's that? Because I can read the Scrum Guide to learn what a Scrum team is, and it tells me: The Scrum Team consists of a Product Owner, the Development Team, and a Scrum Master. Scrum Teams are self-organizing and cross-functional. Self-organizing teams choose how best to ...


63

I think you're approaching this situation the wrong way. You didn't 'fail' the interview; you gave responses that this particular employer doesn't want from their employees. Let me show you what I'm talking about with two quick blurbs from your question: Just imagine you are working on some important simulation system and a client call you at 8pm, he'...


61

First: Don't Panic! The damage has already been done, now it's about two things: Communicating the issue professionally and trying to show that you're not to blame. Stalling is not a good idea, if you've done literally nothing for this project every half-decent manager should be able to find this out pretty quick. You can't really stall things like "show ...


52

So, in your opinion, what would you do in this situation ? Tell the truth to the customer ? Let the projet ended bugged ? I would go ASAP with my boss and expose to them the situation. Tell them that, as of this moment, you lack the resources to finish the project on time. Call them, write them... whatever you have to do to contact them, as this is ...


48

If it’s a core business function — do it yourself, no matter what. There's a wonderful essay written by Joel Spolsky called In Defense of not Invented Here Syndrome. I'll quote some of it here. Indeed during the recent dotcom mania a bunch of quack business writers suggested that the company of the future would be totally virtual — just a trendy couple ...


46

It's mainly about the stability/ duration of your needs. If you know you will need a full-time person to work for you over the next years, it frequently makes sense to employ one. By employing someone directly your initial cost is higher. It includes onboarding, providing the person resources such as a laptop, etc. But the cost pays out when the person turns ...


41

A developers job should be a combination of both maintenance and new project work. I've been doing this for 35+ years. This is common and very misguided. This type of turnover is an organizational problem. All developers should have a combination of fun, exciting project work (the newer stuff) and maintenance work (keep the lights on). In my current ...


41

Assigning blame in this manner is very likely to cause loss of morale and the emergence of extremely dysfunctional behaviours such as: developers refusing to work on code written by others developers refusing to work on old code developers refusing to work on high-risk code or features inflated estimates; reduced cooperation; .... The rise of a blame ...


39

Time for a frame challenge: this issue isn't devs hating maintenance; the issue is that they hate working for your company. I don't think you realize just how insane your turnover rate is. Average IT turnover is 13.2% per year - and that statistic is framed as a "Holy cow, 13.2% is high!" I worked for a PoS company for awhile, and it had a turnover rate ...


38

To me it's quite obvious that your boss let you down, and let the salesperson down, bigtime. If you worked on the wrong thing for a couple of weeks, it would be on you. But it was much much longer than that. It's hard to imagine two competent professionals working on the wrong project for many months without their organization's managers saying "wait, ...


34

Most companies have a lot of "work" which actually doesn't achieve anything. Most meetings come to mind. I spent an hour and a half today in a big round table update meeting, where everyone else talked and the developers played on their phones or doodled on post-its. I logged an hour of Reddit and various chat apps there. The day before I was in a ...


31

In some comments, the OP has stated that I have no experience and idea about the project development needs after it successfully launched. and this is my first experience and don't know having such website application will need what requirements in future(after it launched successfully) As a first time entrepreneur, you might think that you finish ...


29

How can I approach this situation so things are clarified? Is there anything I should be aware of when proceeding with this? As a manager, I've always required a weekly Status Report from everyone who worked for me. And I've always provided one for my boss, whether it was required or not. It was a simple narrative format, requiring minimal time and ...


28

Autonomy is one thing. Project management is a totally different thing. Eight (8) months without ANY project management activity is definitely guaranteed to lead to failure. Agile or no agile. This is not acceptable even in the dumbest start-up. What to do: You just stand for yourself and tell that you were not clearly (or not at all?) told: to stop ...


27

Hmm, these seem like "gotcha" questions to me. Any answer you give could be declared wrong. Especially the first one. If you say, "I would work all night to fix the problem and tell my manager about it the next morning": So on a project worth hundreds of millions of dollars, you're going to make a whole bunch of changes without getting any authorization ...


27

From somebody who has done both: Don't outsource to save money. Do it because you need more talent than you can find in your own location. Outsourcing requires remarkable clarity on what you want, and it requires communicating that clear vision, by documents, talks, explanations. If you outsource you need a strong product manager to keep in constant ...


22

If the company is to survive, you can either become the scapegoat - or profile yourself in professionally handling a horrible situation. You should concentrate on writing down and communicating the problems of this project. As it sounds, 5 days may be too few for even this task, but try to get at least that one done. Where are the issues of the project? ...


19

Your manager is misguided and taking you along on a misguided journey. You break it-you fix it mentality places weight on assigning blame and dishing out punishment. What you’ll get will be “It’s not my code, it’s your darn requirements.”, or “You gave my method garbage data, garbage in-garbage out” or “The database is slow, my code is just fine”... you get ...


18

You probably can't. I've been down this road before. Last place I worked, the VP came around and said "the CTO says we have to fix all bugs within 90 days." As we did scrum and I had a backlog and team velocity, I did some quick calculations for my team and the other directors' teams, and said "At the current rate of clearing bugs with the current team that ...


14

For the company's benefit: There should be a discussion between you, your manager, and someone who can make decisions about multi-million projects. Fact is that there will not be a bug-free product in five days time, that is a given. Fact, that must be communicated clearly to someone higher than your manager, is that there is nothing that you could do ...


13

This isn't an issue of individual accountability lacking. This is an issue of the logistics framework allowing a large amount of bugs to leave your area. Or in short: What's Your Test Plan? I've been dev-ringleader over three projects the last few years. The first had unit tests and a small number of integration tests built in to it. I could make a few ...


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