122

I'm going to go against the grain here. I'm probably wrong based on all the other answers and I'm looking forward to learning something from your comments. I'm also in the USA. I think this is no big deal and you shouldn't push back. Your colleague is a developer for the retail site. He could easily be monitoring the transactions and you jumped out as a ...


115

If it's a one-time thing, do the testing. Your team needs you. QA is drowning. Take over some of their workload and stay in contact with them to make sure you do the job, and you do it well. After having proven yourself as someone who can be relied on in a pinch, you can then tell your manager man do I hate manual testing, and maybe they'll keep that in ...


39

It might be you're trying to win a technical point while your boss is making a business point. You have to understand what his priorities are. Code under test should always return the same value with same inputs It all boils down to one thing: Why are you fighting this battle? Is it because you know you're correct, and are just arguing for the sake of ...


35

If you talk to him outside of work, then you can do that and tell him a few things. What he did was a severe breach of privacy. In his position, he can be fired for breaches of privacy. If the company is caught not respecting people’s privacy it can get expensive. You are not complaining to HR this time and this time only. If you hear of other cases you ...


35

Backend developer myself, I regret it's not uncommon from developers that have admin access to a database to witness private information being in it. It's also likely that because the retail site is internal, the company had/have lower security and privacy standards about it. It is possible that this developer got you in a course of debugging something and ...


32

I would send him this email using your corporate email address: If you have a script notifying you of other employee's purchases, that is not ok. And even if you don't have such a script, or if your script was for debugging purpose, your message to me was still not appropriate either way. Do you understand what I'm saying? Please respond to let ...


26

You should do the testing. In addition to all the workplace related reasons that its a good idea to do it, consider the development benefits (i.e., to you) of doing such functional testing. There's a good chance you'll notice new bugs or quirks that need to be fixed as you run through the product in a way that's different from how you normally use it. ...


14

It's unethical. In the companies I worked damage prevention was highly valued "oh that would have been very expensive, if we wouldn't have catched this now". And the fact that you reviewed all the specs again and found that issue in the first place , would make you a very valuable employee. But If I would ever find out that you hid that to make you look ...


14

Should I be concerned and if so, what should I be doing? It is normal for an exodus to start sometimes. And devs are especially prone to moving on due to the nature of their work and temperaments. In your case you basically just got there and you're as junior as it gets. Stay and ride it out, there's plenty of room for advancement and you can analyse whats ...


12

There's advice from Joel Spolsky, beloved co-founder and ex-CEO of the StackExchange network. He has written blog articles with names like: Top Five (Wrong) Reasons You Don’t Have Testers Why testers? You can read those and present some of the arguments to your boss. No matter how hard it is to find testers, they are still cheaper than programmers. A ...


11

33% of a successful venture is worth a lot more than 100% of failed one. And essentially, they are offering to de-risk your venture (you still collect a salary, you don't need to pay for equipment or office space, etc.) - you get the chance at significant upside without any exposure to the downside. Don't overestimate the value of ideas, and don't ...


11

Your test does not prove your boss is wrong. Also, for some applications I've worked with, regression on the level of numerical accuracy is unacceptable, I once worked with assertion based on file hashes (where tolerance made no sense), and I've even seen people use "tolerance" to claim a failing test was passing (I'm unsure if the person was oblivious to ...


10

I'm going to suggest a course of action based on the information that you and the other developer have been forming a friendship and talk outside of work. Talk to the developer, in person or by phone call, outside of work, about this. Do not use texts, social media, and certainly not any official channel like work slack or email. Leave no paper trail that ...


10

1 The lead developer (not my boss) openly subscribes to the thinking that a lack of documentation is a form of job security. As a result, nothing is written down. 2 The manager (my boss, who is technical) is seemingly unmotivated and uninterested in the work. He takes every Friday off and spends the rest of the time in his office. When I have asked ...


9

The best way to find out if you are fulfilling the expectations of your role is to ask your manager. Arrange some time for a one on one with them, let them know in advance that you'd like feedback about how you're settling into the role (so that they don't get put on the spot, and have time to think about relevant feedback before talking to you), and then ...


8

What you are dealing with is a systemic conflict and its scope far exceeds what you can do at your position. I am saying this as someone who went through pretty much the same ordeal and had to give up and leave at the end after some incredible counter-pressure beyond my wildest imagination when I tried to push for change. Your upper management subscribes to ...


8

What would be the best way to handle this? Your response to this depends heavily on how much trouble you want your colleague to get into. The mild variant is to write him a strongly worded email along the lines of what Stephan's answer suggests, the key components are: What he did is not okay. You take violations of your privacy seriously Ask him to stop ...


8

No particular engineer is responsible for any given part of the code. Rather, everyone as a group is responsible for all of the code. Nothing abnormal about this, being able to work in a team is a good thing anyway. Resumes work best with tangible accomplishments and saying that one was "part of" something doesn't provide evidence of my individual ...


7

Just Do It... You are being asked to do manual testing because you did not help automate the testing. Be glad that it is painful and something that you don't like to do. Hopefully, all the other devs on your team feel the same way. After suffering through the pain of testing manually, ask yourself: "Why do devs at other companies not have to go through ...


7

You might think your "job" is to be a developer. It is not that simple. It is bring any skills and abilities you can to serve the business and the customer. It happens that as the business sells software, that usually means it needs people to write code. But: Software that is not tested (somehow, ideally automatically) is useless because it is guaranteed ...


7

Quick answer is keep calm and carry on. It's your first job, so only these things count: Is it ok for your physical & mental health? Are you learning valuable skills? Are you earning ok? Other things, like how the company is doing, whether it's going to survive long-term etc. is not your problem. You will most likely move to a new job in 2-3 years, ...


7

Show, Don't tell. Come up with different set of test cases, one according to your logic and understanding, and another set with that of your boss. Execute and capture the results. According to your logic the tests will pass, but since your boss's logic is not correct, it'll fail for the different inputs. It'll be made clear then. Also note: Don't make ...


6

I would say the 33% is generous and you should take the offer. They are risking a lot of money with no hope of recouping until the business actually gets to the billing and AR phase. You are getting paid while this happens, so you risk nothing. You are, essentially, acting as an employee. But they are willing to motivate you by offering a partnership. I ...


6

Is the real problem actually with this developer at all? You say he's your best - producing quality code, technically highly literate - but he feels he's a bad fit for the team, based around rather more nebulous ideas of velocity and responsiveness. Are the rest of the team making rapid progress (or at least, the illusion thereof) by doing shoddy work? Are ...


6

Two things you said in your question: the guy who wrote the problematic code is my opponent for the promotion You view your co-workers as opponents? Does he view you as an opponent? Do you honestly believe that they only have budget to promote one of you? And this: A big con I see about revealing this beforehand is that damage prevented is not as ...


5

I know it's not what you want to hear, but you're learning what professional development actually is . I was often put in the position of having to configure a project in order to clear out a lot of errors, just to write from none to a few lines of code, and then extensively test the application in order to verify that nothing broke, and submit a pull ...


5

I'd suggest speaking to the other developer first. If your first step is to go to management questioning the guys credentials (not matter how on the money you might be), you will likely engender a negative working relationship. Instead, have a chat with him and air your concerns. Maybe you'll find out he already knows this and has been busting his gut to ...


5

I think you should job hunt I don't see any indication that management would listen to you. Your phrasing demonstrates that they reject even small changes that you request and yet you want large ones. we have yet to have trouble meeting our milestones This sentence makes it especially difficult. 3-4 months of this in, management is likely crediting ...


5

What can I do to identify the root problem and how can I solve it in general? Instead of trying to solve the root cause, just ask him directly what he wants and what would it take for him to enjoy his job and stay here. If it is just an issue of using (or not using) Slack or some other tool, it should be reasonably within your power to allow him that ...


4

Do you do any Python scripting in your current job? If not, start doing so. There is always something that can be automated. My current project has 16,500+ compiler warnings (!). On my first day, I spent 15 minutes to knock up a script to ignore the not so serious warnings (variable declared, but no used, etc), so that we could see the important ones. ...


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