9

Manager asked me to reconsider my resignation and he sounded quite convincing, should I listen to him? Unless he presented a written offer, that included the increased salary you should not be convinced of anything other than "business as usual". Any manager that has the desire and means to give you what he has "promised" would have already done so. ...


4

If you need to integrate with their code, why not treat it as a black box? If you specify what outcomes you need to achieve and ask them to outline how to interface with their code to achieve the desired outcomes, rather than reviewing the code itself. In other words, ask them for a detailed spec (similar to a service contract from an API perspective) ...


4

I think you are approaching your task from the wrong end. If your goal is to help drive better coding standards, that won't be done by questioning the existing codebase. You have to lead by example to achieve that, and be able to explain why the way you did a specific piece of code is better than the previous one. There is no reason for you to learn the ...


4

Other answers are generally correct in the advice of getting any promises in writing, but are glossing over a really important fact for your situation: You resigned without having another job lined up. That really puts you in a tough situation that is going to be difficult to remedy. While you can't trust any promise of a raise or more responsibility by ...


3

I am reading your other question and I believe you currently do not have a job lined up. So your hypothetical pay bump is only that, an assumption that may not materialize anytime soon. I think you should not have quit and instead stayed on board without having said anything at all. During this time you look for a job that lines up with what you expect. ...


3

That offer is worth the paper he printed it on... If he was serious then it would have been on paper. He is already delaying a raise until May.. And when you get to May the next excuse will be “the current economic situation” or “a customer downturn”. Look for the next post and good luck.


3

My experience both personally and watching what happens with others is that the best thing is not to make a full change at all. You have 2 years backend, rather than jump to something else, expand on that, either into infrastructure for backend or other directions, perhaps even hosting, but don't waste the experience, build on it. The more wholistic a ...


2

What’s your goal here? All I’m seeing from your question is personal education as I’m not seeing a business goal (e.g. need to learn the code base because I’ll be developing the product with the group, writing test cases etc). The developers only have a certain amount of time in a day, and given the choice between the goals put in front of them by their boss ...


2

There are few ways of adding "a set of skills that are rare to find in programmers". The easy way is to identify technologies that are well established, rare but pay well and try to get into that area (for example COBOL). The down sides of this approach in my opinion are huge. Majority of the software like that was already written so your primary goal ...


2

Since you asked on workplace.stackexchange.com and not floatingpoint.stackexchange.com: You are fighting a pointless fight. You know you're right, and you know the boss is the boss, and you know that as long as everything passes everything is fine. so write these unit tests the way your boss wants to write them. You're not doing it because he is right and ...


2

Only by scanning through the comments I found out what apparently your problem is: You need to write software that integrates with the existing software. You shouldn’t have to look at their code at all, and the code quality shouldn’t matter to you. What you need is clearly documented interfaces. And if those clearly documented interfaces are not there, ...


2

You are willing to leave your job for a 40% raise, and your boss is giving you unsubstantiated promises about the possibility of a raise and wants you to talk to the CTO. Sounds like your boss has no leverage and is desperately wanting to keep you around, but has nothing to offer. If a valued employee of mine was leaving, I would come to him with paperwork ...


1

According to him I could get a 40-50% hike in my next job, but he asked me to an analysis and see if that is what I want. According to me the current organization cannot give me that hike, the next appraisal cycle is in May. He says that I am sincere and it should pay off in the current organization. If it were a 10% hike, I could see the ...


1

First of all, the project needs documentation - not just documentation for users, but documentation for developers. That's where you're supposed to start, by reading through the documentation. This documentation is not simply a list of classes/functions, not simply a doxygen-generated list of comments from the code, it needs to have a good general overview ...


1

You and your boss are viewing this situation through the lens of different goals. You: The test should fail if the software does not give a "suitable" answer Boss: The test should fail if it gives a different answer than it gave in the past Consider the downsides of each approach: Tolerance: You have to figure out an appropriate tolerance for each ...


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