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704

You are already a real developer. I'm guessing that your boss is belittling you in order to keep your morale down, so that you're less likely to look for another job or ask for a better salary. Five years of experience is more than enough to consider yourself a qualified developer. Given that your current role is not going well, and you have an emotionally ...


394

I was hired for a 2.5 month contract. I was warned by friends and family not to throw myself into the work and not finish too quickly. I ignored them, and did the job in 3 weeks. My employer had me budgeted for the full 2.5 months (I did not know this when I did the job). When I finished early, I was asked to assist with a process that was taking 10 ...


314

Be humble. I'm a bit confused here. My understanding was that feature X has property Y. Is there something I'm missing here which means this doesn't work in this case? Much better to start from the assumption that you are the one that is wrong, rather than the other way round. If you're wrong, you'll learn something; if you were in fact right, you've now ...


277

But something I need to do. But what? Provide your feedback in a "constructive way", and be done about it. Not your place to make decisions. Mention something along the lines of "It was good to get a chance to evaluate the product X. As I see it: - Pros: 1, 2, 3 - Cons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, ...... As it is evident from the analysis ...


264

This of course could place the company under serious fire for invading users' privacy when we get found out. In fact, as far as my country's laws go, it not only illegal, it is unconstitutional. You're being asked to break the law and do things that might land you in prison or otherwise in serious trouble. This argument fell on my CEO's deaf ears, ...


254

I think you're asking the wrong question. I'm going to go ahead and say that challenge was probably designed for you to fail it: You've been given a really impromptu test, which is kind of weird outside of an interview setting. I've never heard of it happening like that before. If my manager suddenly did that, I'd stare blankly at him and ask what the heck ...


196

You launched a formal complaint complete with witnesses and documentation which was investigated for 10 weeks while you were paid for doing nothing, and then your complaints were found to be groundless, even your witnesses did not back you up. Is this co-worker relationship salvageable? No. You put multiple people into a difficult position. Things will ...


180

Based off your information on this question I assume this question is also linked with this question. The way your manager has sprung this test on you is completely unfair and clearly an attempt to prove that you are not able to work here when realistically the time restraint was likely too short and the notice was non-existent. The way he approached you ...


161

Since your boss doesn't care that this is incredibly invasive, warn him that starting on Android Q, to be released later this year, Android will (finally) block apps from recording video and sound while not in the foreground. Therefore, it will be the same situation you have with iOS. Of course it will take sometime until Android Q has a significant ...


150

Unfortunately maintenance is the rule when working in IT, very rarely are there new projects, and people get reassigned around projects regularly. And while the quality of the code you will have to maintain in your professional life will vary widely, they will never smell the same as a fresh 2-6 month old project. However, there are things you can do to ...


143

Your corporate email account doesn't belong to you, it's not confidential to you - it belongs to the business. You need to allow access to that mailbox after you leave so that the business can look to see if there's any emails that are valuable or have information that isn't anywhere else. Normally, a forwarding system will be enabled so that any future ...


138

I suggest you put the question up for discussion to the team. Present your concerns at the next team meeting and ask what they think about them. Since they sound like valid concerns I would imagine you'll get support from the other developers. Make sure the discussion stays professional and keep an opened mind. Focus on how using X affects the rest of the ...


135

How would you deal with such situation ? After nicely comforting him, which you have already done, it's time to firmly tell them to deal with it. It is not an individual's code, but the company's. As a manager, you need the code to be as maintainable as possible by your team and new additions you make to the team in the future. "code formatting is ...


133

You are worrying about nothing. Software has bugs, that is inevitable, and everyone knows it. QA finds bugs, hopefully puts them into a bug tracking system, and you take one bug from the bug tracker, fix it, then the next one and so on until you are finished. There is no need to mention where this bug comes from. Nobody cares. If someone asks you why there ...


132

Document everything, starting now. You will likely need it. Do not start building this feature. Do not prioritize it, do not write tickets for it, do not task your team with anything to do with it. If management wants to chastise you over dereliction of duty, allow them to do so, and simply ignore everything they say. Document these situations as well. Go ...


132

Get it in writing. Save a copy of said confirmation away from company hardware. Violating software and service licenses are the kind of thing that, if they are caught, can really screw over a company. They will want someone to blame and an unscrupulous windbag will end up deleting any emails on the company servers related to their 'request' and make you ...


129

However, I have no problems working with very junior employees but I know that in the first half year/year they will require a lot of tutoring and may even slow down the projects our team is working on. Every new employee slows down projects while they are being trained and becoming comfortable in the position. In fact, we are looking now for a new ...


126

Honestly, my reaction would be the following: Bob, I appreciate the feedback, but as a team we've decided that we're using Black as our mandatory code formatting tool, and that decision is final. I understand it's not your personal preference, but I'm afraid that you're going to need to learn to work with it. But if I wanted to engage in a discussion? ...


125

No, this isn't typical in any workplace. You have a successful website that you built - $6,000 per year in ad revenue is nice. That, plus your bug fixing ability, and the new software you're building from scratch, are certainly enough to find you a better paying job in a company where you can actually learn from professional developers. I'd recommend ...


122

I'm going to go against the grain here. I'm probably wrong based on all the other answers and I'm looking forward to learning something from your comments. I'm also in the USA. I think this is no big deal and you shouldn't push back. Your colleague is a developer for the retail site. He could easily be monitoring the transactions and you jumped out as a ...


120

You already are a developer. There is a meme doing the rounds on LinkedIn at the moment which is worth quoting here: Your value does not decrease by somebody else's failure to see your worth Developers are in huge demand. There have been recent articles stating that developers are more important to companies than gaining access to capital - and that ...


115

If it's a one-time thing, do the testing. Your team needs you. QA is drowning. Take over some of their workload and stay in contact with them to make sure you do the job, and you do it well. After having proven yourself as someone who can be relied on in a pinch, you can then tell your manager man do I hate manual testing, and maybe they'll keep that in ...


108

After two weeks, I can say with confidence that I clearly didn't create value for this company and the other developers that helped me could have done my job instead of spending time with me. You will not create "net positive" value for the company for much longer than that (even when I hire senior developers I assume they aren't net positive for 6 months). ...


107

Yes, the real world is a lot different to what you are taught at university. When you work for a business, the job is to make a profit, not deliver software according to an idealised software development process. A lot of the time these things overlap, but not always. It is perfectly legitimate to "cut corners" from time to time. While you may lament that ...


103

Just tell him the facts as you currently see them. It's really that simple. You may need to organize a meeting to discuss the implications of this change and how it relates to the roadmap. Come to this meeting with estimates, as well as you can do them for now (and what items you can't estimate for, due to lack of information). And then let him decide ...


95

In the interview, simply ask what their flexible working policy is and indicate that you've found remote working to be productive in the past. Then see what their policy/approach is and work from there. You'll probably find out here at what point you'll be allowed to work remotely (e.g. after the probation period has elapsed). You need not make a big deal ...


92

How can I handle the risk to the project presented by X? To address this, I am going to use your own words: it's evolving fast / unstable - on going to document some older code, he found some base functionality had been removed, wouldn't compile in newer versions, so took a couple of days to re-implement it AND the other devs are clearly ...


89

It's completely normal to feel lost as a new job the first month It sounds like you're doing the right thing Waiting, studying in this free time, and looking for be busy Keep studying. You will get better. A few things I do when I start a new job/project 1) Spend personal time reading a book on their technology stack 2) Volunteer for grunt work that ...


82

This is not an average software development job, and you're right on the mark in guessing in what ways it differs. A typical such job will generally: Pay far more. Be well organized with a clear structure of management and processes. Have far less turn-over. Not care if you're 5 minutes late, let alone if you reached the door on time but your desk 5 ...


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