New answers tagged

9

There are already good answers, but there's another angle to consider: a real-world blacklist is never complete. What happens if it turns out the employer is using another spreadsheet, like LibreOffice or Google Docs? What happens if they use an even worse technology stack, like a horrible mash-up of [least-favourite language], [proprietary GUI regex ...


6

Your goal must be to use the best (available) alternative. You pretty much said that on I have encountered with people (usually my bosses) using software which is very much not suitable for the scale of the project I was working on. However, you reach a wrong conclusion I will under no circumstances will use Excel You should (try to) use the best ...


0

If you really feel strongly enough that you would rather pass up a job than work with Excel (or any other specific technology), the way to approach it in a contract is to require "working with your own choice of suitable technologies", rather than specifically banning this one. Stating you are against one of the major known tools will get you ...


32

You're asking the wrong question. The question is: Will you avoid wasting your times with jobs requiring Excel when you have no intention of ever using it (most likely "yes"), and: Will it negatively affect your ability to get jobs that do not require the use of Excel? Where I work, no developer job will require you to use Excel for software ...


3

Most companies use Excel, only a few use it innapropriatly so it is a bad idea to say you won't use Excel. I have had to use Excel in an inappropriate way myself, at least I got to learn how to programmatically construct an Excel spreadsheet, which on its own was a useful experience, even if it was the wrong use of Excel. It will be a rare situation where ...


-5

If you can land the contract, you can write it any way you like!


1

Sure. Job interviews are a two-way process. Remember, a job interview isn’t just a way for a company to find a good employee: they’re also a way for prospective employees to evaluate the company. Some of the answers given here are to the effect of “have fun not being employed”, but that’s entirely the point of making a request like this: anyone who would ...


10

Not the best approach As a professional you should be able to work with every tool in your job description arsenal and be ready to learn / adapt a new ways of doing things, technology is a fluid field and changes constantly Every goal has a best fitting tool and plethora of other tools that have different degrees of "ish" fit IMHO, when you state ...


15

As an employee, you will never be able to write into a contract which software you won't use. The best you can do, as eg a Python Developer, is to make sure that your contract specifies your work duties as developing Python Software. And quiz the company about their tech stack in general and their use of Excel specifically. Not "I refuse to use it" ...


127

TLDR: Yes, it is unprofessional. If I were to read such a thing in a contract, I'd simply think I was dealing with someone who would be too difficult to bother with, and move on to the next person. Putting such a thing in a contract sends a message that you are unwilling or unable to handle the technology you are excluding to the point of being a hindrance ...


7

Is it professional, or common, to write a contract which includes that I will under no circumstances will use a certain technology (in my own case, Excel), because in my past experience, it is a source of frustration and dangerous unexpected behaviours ? Well, if the company insists on using the technology that you will under no circumstances use (all ...


2

I don't know about "professional" or "common" but if you are going to include something like that on your resume, it would probably be wise to include reasoning. Because a simple "I absolutely will not work with MS Excel" is likely to be met by many employers with the reasoning: "He won't use Excel? But we do use Excel. ...


0

Include a mention of any tutors/TAs that you managed. Generally, a university lecturer doesn’t teach a course/unit/class/[whatever jargon term your university uses] by themselves. They lead a team of other staff (often referred to as something like “tutors” or “teaching assistants”), who assist them by teaching smaller tutorials and practical classes, along ...


1

6,000 JIRA tickets: Assuming you do two weekly sprints, you calculate which sprint would fall into the two weeks after you retire, and that’s where they go. Seriously, that’s a task for your manager’s manager’s manager. But I think it’s possible in JIRA to close 6,000 tickets as “Won’t do”. Better yet: “Need more information”. Even better: Call a meeting for ...


3

What leadership skills can a lecturer even write? We don't know yet the specifics of the course(s) that you lectured, but regardless of that, imparting a lecture involves having to lead the students/listeners in their learning process. Besides preparing the lecture content and visual aids for the class, a lecturer/teacher should have the ability to be able ...


0

No, you should not do this. Your reasoning seems to be "I'm doing this all on my own, therefore I should reap the rewards of success." However you're not doing it on your own. Other people in your company did all of the following: Identified a need in the market Acquired customers Figured out how to let you program microcontrollers when you don'...


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