New answers tagged

0

It is probably just a bad fit for you Some people are very focused on feedback and feel lost without it. Others prefer to be in a company where they can just do their own thing. I don't think those personalities can work together for long. There are also those who closely follow incentives and those who don't and again, they can't work well together. Scrum ...


5

The point of software development is to develop working software that has value. "Coding to the spec" and "not willing to drag others along" are not valued attributes. Half-finished features have no value. Features blindly coded to a bad spec have no value. If you're given a spec that has problems and you're the only one who realizes that, your ...


3

The usual method is that the team assigns points to tasks, and then team members pick up whatever tasks they like. If you somehow manage to get too many points assigned to your task, I'll pick it up and look good :-) But really that's not going to happen with scrum done properly, because all the other members figure out that the points are inflated. If you ...


0

And what should I say when they ask about my current offers from university (as it is expected any good student will have offers). Its unlikely they will ask. I've seen it a few times, but its really not that common. There's no good reason for them to care about offers unless they are trying to take advantage of you divulging too much information to lowball ...


1

Continue interviewing. If company B makes you an offer and you decide to take it, let company A and your university know as soon as possible. Until that time, however, do not divulge the fact that you're interviewing to anyone who does not strictly need to know. If asked by your university, dodge the question by pointing to your offer from company A. If ...


3

We can´t tell you what to do. First make up your mind where you ultimately want to be. Startup can be quite exciting, but can also be a hell to work in an with no experience... you will probably be expected to do get things done with little supervision. If you want to stay at A, tell B you have singed a contract elsewhere. Tell them you are sorry but the ...


0

The problem here seems to be that the person who's meant to be representing your department to the CEO/board is failing to secure the budget they should be. There are multiple possible reasons for this - from the company having financial issues; to planning to outsource; to the (what you hope) just poor management representation. The head of the department ...


1

I am going to tackle this from the organizational side. The way this should be done, even for bugfixes, even for small ones, is via ticket/issue. If this was the case, make sure a person is assigned to a ticket and it is clear whether or not the ticket is currently in progress. Make sure to put a policy in place, in case you want multiple people to work on ...


13

To use the analogy, fireman may be more appreciated than fire marshals, but the people doing the appreciating usually do so from the burnt wreckage of their house. He's basically proposing sabotaging the business and then swooping in to be the hero. Quite apart from the ethics of doing so, there are huge risks - the business as a whole loses so much money ...


11

Your team needs to get organised better. Two people trying to fix the same problem is a waste of time. And the way you tell this story, it seems you don’t do code reviews - that’s something you ought to change. Apart from that: The bug is fixed, so what is the problem?


11

Unless his fix is flawed you should thank him and move on. Even if the bug is in code you wrote, it's not really your bug nor is it your code. It is the company's code and the company's mission is to deploy that code without bugs. Your colleague is doing the company a favor by fixing bugs. It's great that you want to be responsible for all code you ...


11

There are multiple distinct issues in your question, but I think the whole situation is worth adressing as one. It seems like you are clearly being managed out. For context, in germany, it is not easy to fire an employee, and it is significantly harder to fire an employee with long tenure and no obvious brazen behavioral misgivings. Thus managers often ...


3

This is a Prisoner’s Dilemma, and all it takes is one person defecting to ruin it for everybody else. Simply put, by acting in a manner counter to the organisation’s goals and then recruiting the rest of the team to do so as well, the new manager has effectively created a Prisoner’s Dilemma situation, where all it takes to ruin something is for one person ...


1

Talk to your manager. “Remember 3 years ago when you asked me if I’m interested in such and such position...well it kinda sounds interesting to me now and wanted to check with you if that position is still open.” Worst case scenario is the position is not open, but in case it opens up again, your boss is already aware that you taking the spot is a ...


5

There’s no upside for the developers to do things right. There however is an upside to do things fast - the bonus. I didn’t see any penalties for substandard work and add the fact that their contract might or might not be renewed in x months and you’ve basically taken away the incentive for developers to do things right. Determine what’s important to you/...


12

The behaviour of your colleagues is based on their incentives. Their incentives are set at a very high level. I don't know what you're experience or place in the organisation is, but since you don't even have a say in the processed used for development, I dont think you occupy a place of significant organisational power. (And btw, you guys are doing the ...


4

I'll tell you my perspective as a technology lead/delivery manager, I managed, trained, and coached multiple teams: If a person tells me that they are looking for something specific – I won't offer them anything else in future, especially if they are aiming at something that could be considered higher than offered, because there is a risk offending them. As ...


9

It's awful. I cannot stress enough that the new manager's plan is to ensure that the company is vulnerable to the exact disaster it just experienced, which the company almost certainly is trying to actively prevent from happening again, at a time when the company is likely to be most attentive to these issues and severe responses will be least expensive. It'...


5

3 years is a long time in software development to change your mind about where you want your career to go. The easiest path here is to approach your manager, who has just been assuming you aren't interested for years now. Be sure you only convey the positive, that you are excited to pursue this opportunity in the company, because of (name something like a ...


5

I feel like most (if not all) devs are temp workers, that should've been a red flag since before you even joined. As @AndreiROM (I'm not used to StackOverflow tagging etiquette) suggested, the best alternative would be to 'leave these people to run their circus any way they'd like'. The problem seems to be the company culture. If there is not a strong, ...


16

In a comment, you clarified your question as, what options might exist to fix the short term outlook of the developers which is making its way into the code? Rather than directly address the specific challenges you're describing (i.e. how to deal with your frustrating Scrum Master), I think it's more valuable to step back, zoom out, and consider a ...


6

It seems to me like you're playing a losing hand: your manager doesn't feel he has the political capital to push for change (which right off the bat is a red flag that he's there to simply enforce the status quo) the higher-ups don't understand that their ship is headed toward disaster (another red flag) the scrum master has no idea that the work he is ...


1

It can be applicable even if the job you're applying to does not need it, depending on how you spin it on the interview. You can present yourself as someone willing to adapt to whatever the company wants and needs at any given time. My favorite saying is "If the company wants me to do C++, I will do C++... and if tomorrow they want me to do D--, I will ...


6

Before we answer your question, you need to ask yourself a few questions: What kind of job are you applying for? What specific skills or knowledge are required for that job? Does X help an employer evaluate my skills against their requirements? Sometimes, even if X isn't directly listed in the job requirements, telling an employer that you posses skill X ...


4

This answer isn't just for "old languages" but basically for any skill. If it is a skill you have, if that's relevant to the job you want, list it in your resume. If it's an irrelevant skill, a skill you don't want to use anymore (do you want to develop in Visual Basic?), remove it. So, if you're aiming for a Java Software development job and you dont ...


0

I will just state my personal experience here, as a software developer who have been in this exact same situation. Hope this helps! I already had job offers, but as a tech worker, you'll probably be hunted just as I am, so I won't worry about that. I had precise reasons to leave. In my case I wanted to work with a specific set of technologies, so that I ...


0

You'll find all sorts of sources for how many people accept counteroffers and then still leave within a year, and they tend to suggest that between 60 and 90% of people who accept a counter offer still leave within the year. With that in mind, I tend to think that a counter offer needs to be: Clear on exactly what it's offering - no vague terms, definite ...


1

I think @rath is correct in telling you to let it go. However, the one thing that could possibly change your manager's mind and cause him to relent is for him to hear the same complaint from additional people. While I don't think a coding standard for floating point evaluation in unit tests are not worth dying on your sword over, your manager probably ...


6

I’m adding a separate answer because most of the answers are speaking to normal negotiation situations and not yours. From your posts, you’re willing and able to be jobless vs. do a job you don’t want to do. So it seems this isn’t about this company paying you more now or possessing leverage over them. Similarly, the usual points about them wanting to ...


4

I am reading your other question and I believe you currently do not have a job lined up. So your hypothetical pay bump is only that, an assumption that may not materialize anytime soon. I think you should not have quit and instead stayed on board without having said anything at all. During this time you look for a job that lines up with what you expect. ...


21

Other answers are generally correct in the advice of getting any promises in writing, but are glossing over a really important fact for your situation: You resigned without having another job lined up. That really puts you in a tough situation that is going to be difficult to remedy. While you can't trust any promise of a raise or more responsibility by ...


15

Diplomacy frequently consists in soothingly saying, “Nice doggie,” until you have a chance to pick up a rock. —Walter Trumball. Right now, they're saying "nice doggy". As soon as you agree, they'll look for that rock. Every last career adviser, myself included, will warn you about accepting a counter offer. The simple reason is that you have proven that ...


0

If you have an offer from another company... You don’t owe him an analysis...you can give him one but it’s voluntary at this point. Sounds like he’s giving you more responsibility but I haven’t seen any indicator of a pay bump. What’s the end goal of talking to the CTO? At the end of the day, you have promises coming in from your current and your next ...


4

That offer is worth the paper he printed it on... If he was serious then it would have been on paper. He is already delaying a raise until May.. And when you get to May the next excuse will be “the current economic situation” or “a customer downturn”. Look for the next post and good luck.


1

You are willing to leave your job for a 40% raise, and your boss is giving you unsubstantiated promises about the possibility of a raise and wants you to talk to the CTO. Sounds like your boss has no leverage and is desperately wanting to keep you around, but has nothing to offer. If a valued employee of mine was leaving, I would come to him with paperwork ...


59

Manager asked me to reconsider my resignation and he sounded quite convincing, should I listen to him? Unless he presented a written offer, that included the increased salary you should not be convinced of anything other than "business as usual". Any manager that has the desire and means to give you what he has "promised" would have already done so. ...


2

According to him I could get a 40-50% hike in my next job, but he asked me to an analysis and see if that is what I want. According to me the current organization cannot give me that hike, the next appraisal cycle is in May. He says that I am sincere and it should pay off in the current organization. If it were a 10% hike, I could see the ...


0

How can I convince my developer that ... The level of precision is not relevant to what we do No sane developer will type 0.3000000000004 on a unit test on their IDE as a result of 0.2 + 0.1 We have bigger fish to fry and we can definitely use his help on those things -His Boss What I’m saying here is that you’re coming in from a “doing things right” ...


6

There are few ways of adding "a set of skills that are rare to find in programmers". The easy way is to identify technologies that are well established, rare but pay well and try to get into that area (for example COBOL). The down sides of this approach in my opinion are huge. Majority of the software like that was already written so your primary goal ...


5

My experience both personally and watching what happens with others is that the best thing is not to make a full change at all. You have 2 years backend, rather than jump to something else, expand on that, either into infrastructure for backend or other directions, perhaps even hosting, but don't waste the experience, build on it. The more wholistic a ...


2

You and your boss are viewing this situation through the lens of different goals. You: The test should fail if the software does not give a "suitable" answer Boss: The test should fail if it gives a different answer than it gave in the past Consider the downsides of each approach: Tolerance: You have to figure out an appropriate tolerance for each ...


2

Only by scanning through the comments I found out what apparently your problem is: You need to write software that integrates with the existing software. You shouldn’t have to look at their code at all, and the code quality shouldn’t matter to you. What you need is clearly documented interfaces. And if those clearly documented interfaces are not there, ...


1

First of all, the project needs documentation - not just documentation for users, but documentation for developers. That's where you're supposed to start, by reading through the documentation. This documentation is not simply a list of classes/functions, not simply a doxygen-generated list of comments from the code, it needs to have a good general overview ...


3

I think you are approaching your task from the wrong end. If your goal is to help drive better coding standards, that won't be done by questioning the existing codebase. You have to lead by example to achieve that, and be able to explain why the way you did a specific piece of code is better than the previous one. There is no reason for you to learn the ...


2

What’s your goal here? All I’m seeing from your question is personal education as I’m not seeing a business goal (e.g. need to learn the code base because I’ll be developing the product with the group, writing test cases etc). The developers only have a certain amount of time in a day, and given the choice between the goals put in front of them by their boss ...


4

If you need to integrate with their code, why not treat it as a black box? If you specify what outcomes you need to achieve and ask them to outline how to interface with their code to achieve the desired outcomes, rather than reviewing the code itself. In other words, ask them for a detailed spec (similar to a service contract from an API perspective) ...


2

Since you asked on workplace.stackexchange.com and not floatingpoint.stackexchange.com: You are fighting a pointless fight. You know you're right, and you know the boss is the boss, and you know that as long as everything passes everything is fine. so write these unit tests the way your boss wants to write them. You're not doing it because he is right and ...


11

Your test does not prove your boss is wrong. Also, for some applications I've worked with, regression on the level of numerical accuracy is unacceptable, I once worked with assertion based on file hashes (where tolerance made no sense), and I've even seen people use "tolerance" to claim a failing test was passing (I'm unsure if the person was oblivious to ...


41

It might be you're trying to win a technical point while your boss is making a business point. You have to understand what his priorities are. Code under test should always return the same value with same inputs It all boils down to one thing: Why are you fighting this battle? Is it because you know you're correct, and are just arguing for the sake of ...


7

Show, Don't tell. Come up with different set of test cases, one according to your logic and understanding, and another set with that of your boss. Execute and capture the results. According to your logic the tests will pass, but since your boss's logic is not correct, it'll fail for the different inputs. It'll be made clear then. Also note: Don't make ...


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