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In the top section of my Resume I am adding link to my Github Profile preceeded with Github logo. When it comes to marking invidual links to repositories in the Resume I am adding small clickable icon at the end of name of each project in order to get to the repository. I think it's very good way to do it as it is not super intrusive and takes very little ...


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I stuff it in the top along with my other contact information, such as my LinkedIn and DevPost. I make them both nice clickable hyperlinks as well as easy to just type into the web browser. Like this:


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I've been told over and over to include my Github page in my resume as it's a way for potential employers to gauge my skill and past projects That's usually a very good idea to get through the CV screening. You will usually want to include this as a few lines somewhere in your experience, together with a link they can follow to see the code you've written (...


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While there is little you can do to make your projects public by default (due to NDAs, school anti-plagiarism rules, etc.), there are a few possible alternative solutions: Place a link to your GitHub profile besides your contact information. You would have your phone number, address/location, and then your GitHub profile. This would only be beneficial if ...


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If your current company is pushing for career development then you'll need to make it clear to your manager that's not what you want. There are many places that will be fine with you just staying at your current level. If you are an intermediate (e.g. non-senior) developer then expect that they will like for you to eventually become a senior but again you ...


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Your boss is telling you he wants you to become a key employer, but in order for you to become that you need to do more of the stuff he needs done. In other words, if you do not take up the work he suggests for you he will need to hire another person to do it. There might not be enough UI work for you to keep you fully occupied, and you do not want to do ...


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First you need to check if your boss is the one who want good employees or one that want to "produce" managers. Remember that in some companies you cannot go past certain pay if you are not promoted to certain groups or position. With that in mind embelish WHY you don't want to do certain things. For example for me it was my inability to enforce ...


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I have no interest whatsoever about career development and fulfilled with the current work I am doing You're actually in demand in many places. Turnover is high with devs as many want to progress their careers or other reasons. Many govt and large corporations are quite happy to have someone quietly sit in the same role for a decade and churn out work. Just ...


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Less likely, as there are fewer places to develop into. It does depend on what you mean by "smaller" but a lot of the traditional career progression is constrained by the fact that there is no "up" in many smaller companies. A friend of mine works for a 5 person startup. There is one person above him, the founding CTO/CEO. In my 300ish ...


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I think the concept are the same with smaller companies. If they see you that you are master with your field, they tend to force you take the management position. Let me explain it just a bit. These are my experience in small company. Manpower is not enough, so you will become an all around guy. I worked before in a really small gaming company where I was a ...


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I've worked with lots of developers who have done just this for their careers of 20 or 30 years and more. I wouldn't be overly surprised if the vast majority of developers are like this - it's just that they are invisible as they are also not writing blogs or tweeting hot takes.


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I don`t think there is any universally quantifiable metric to score developers on Sales example is not a good one to compare development against being a solo, specific target industry. Software development is always a team effort, that includes not only actual coders, team leaders and system analysts but also Business Analysts, Project Managers and such Each ...


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I will echo what other say but I suspect this was the idea all along. As you've said the other developers refused so what I think happened is that they first asked everyone who would be able to do the job and they all refused. Then they hired externally (you) and bait and switched you to do this job. This is what they wanted all along. So setting goals about ...


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Here's my comment to similar questions How can I avoid having an interviewer lie to me about what the job will entail? and Employer changes working hours You are on probation. Remember that the company is on probation with you too. Straight out of the gate they changed two things: a) what you're supposed to do b) for how long. And as @Spotted_Flamingo ...


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What awards are available for software engineers? Bonuses, favourable reviews, added responsibility, additional training and certification. The normal stuff. Sales is a very different scenario and sometimes the pay is low and the awards are what they really work for and often compete for. This approach won't work with professional engineers.


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I would argue that this would likely be destructive Sales is largely an individual sport. Development is a team one. As a result there are fewer awards for it as individual performance is harder to determine. Having devs compete against each other would undermine a lot of development work. It also doesn’t help that engineering is often considered a cost by ...


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It is understandable why you agreed, you want to be a team player but unfortunately your company took advantage of this. I would suggest you have a meeting with your manager immediately and put together an action plan, it could look something like: Remind your manager of your area of expertise and that it is not this current technology and that you only ...


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You might want to read a book or two on making change in the workplace happen. The direct order method from boss can work, but often is suboptimal: People might follow the rules to the letter, but when their spirit is not in it, productivity suffers. Your workflow isnt the standard in the company, but has mixed adoption. Why is that? Are there force working ...


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I wonder what might be a fine method to approach him regarding our workflow? If his resistance is detrimental to the projects that he works on then his manager needs to sit with him and show him how his "resistance" is hurting the project and remind him that he has to follow the established workflow or there will be consequences. If the colleague ...


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I think your problem is rooted in your own insecurity and probably unrealistic self-imposed expectations. You recognize this yourself. However I think your approach is totally the wrong one for this situation. You are a 'data scientist', your skills are different to the ones of your colleagues and there will a moment where they will rely on those skills to ...


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The way I understand you problem is that you need to be trained in some technical areas. The most reasonable thing to do is to talk to your manager about this and ask for support. Depending on the specifics of the business, your manager should be able to find a good solution for you, possibly with the help of your colleagues. To be even more professional, ...


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Frame Challenge: This is not a double standard! Context matters here, workers that are employed automatically stay up to date on the practical part by working on their projects. Staying up to date in actually applying a skill is different from purely informing yourself about things. Yeah, reading books is cool, and I'd already consider that a plus, but it's ...


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They are probably looking for you to name some specific training courses like Udemy and then talk a bit about them. You can also expand your answer a bit by talking about projects you did to practice your skills, and offer them some proof like a Github repo. Contributions to open source projects are good too. Basically you need something that makes you ...


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One of the most common questions I get asked is, how I stayed up to date on programming since I was out of the loop for about a year. I usually answer truthfully that I allocate time to self-studying on a very regular basis. Let me play devil's advocate. This is a good answer, but the problem is that most people are going to say the same thing whether it'...


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I get asked is, how I stayed up to date on programming since I was out of the loop for about a year. Often the reaction to this is kind of negative, more than once I was told “that does not really count”. The first time I heard this, I was a bit stunned, because I was unsure what the company would have expected. This is going to vary by company. At my ...


2

Fields as defined in academia can be quite large, as to accommodate the varied interests of faculty and researchers. Job roles as defined in industry can be very narrow, because companies are (almost always) looking to solve a specific business problem by filling that role. Correspondingly a degree in ECE could be solid preparation for a dev role, but it ...


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This will likely depend on the job and the company (and even the specific hiring team). I can tell you that I've known several programmers who had degrees in electrical engineering, so many employers will likely consider it related. Ultimately, the only way to know for sure is to apply - if they don't think it's related enough, they'll just reject you. ...


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