New answers tagged

1

I should have asked more questions about this before joining That appears to be the obvious answer to your question. You need to ask in the interview about things that are important to you. Something like How many of your products and projects are using X ? What tool chain do you use for X? What technology stacks are you using and what's the outlook for X ...


5

If you want to work with and progress with Technology X, I'd say the best way to go about that is to look for and accept a position that specifically works with that technology. The second best option is to try and latch on to a company that is heavily and strategically invested in that technology as part of what they do, even through a different position, ...


-3

I would really like to keep growing in that technology, but this company doesn't seem to care at all about this technology, which I deduce from the facts that since I joined I haven't touched that technology at all (they heavily favor one of the competitors, something they didn't tell me before I joined), they have never provided any training support on that ...


0

The size of the project leads to collaboration. Thus, the Large Hadron Collider has thousands of people from academia working together. Numerous space projects have an academic as lead scientist with hundreds of other people spread around the world collaborating. These projects often take decades with multiple rounds of proposals, redesigning, and finally ...


0

In the real world, companies fight each other. If a company does not deliver, its employee will soon need to find themselves a new working place. So, usually, in companies, the main goal is the success of the company. So people will, usually, corporate in order to deliver faster and better products for the overall good of the company, that will result in ...


0

What leads to a collaborative software development workplace? The need to collaborate. It makes no difference if it's a startup or not. Businesses tend to be more focused on production, they have time constraints that directly affect their revenue stream or issues with staff retention, task tracking or a number of other things that do not affect academia as ...


0

But it shouldn't be about how much time he spends testing. Rather it should be whether his code is tested enough. You said he has fewer defects after 1 month of coding than other guys have after coding for 2 months and spending more time coding. Maybe you should have this junior guy teaching you and the other guys how to test more efficiently. Obviously you ...


0

I've discussed this with management and tried to argue that we should bring back some QA to reduce testing times but they want to have a meeting with him and escalate things which I absolutely do not want to do. You argued the wrong thing. If management want developers to do QA, and you can't change their mind, that's the end of it. You need to work with ...


4

This is really simple. There's nothing wrong with the actual performance of this young developer. The problem is his performance measured by some rather stupid performance metric. So you just explain to him what he needs to do to get around that performance metrics. I had the problem once where someone counted how often you checked in stuff into Perforce. So ...


5

There's quite a bit going on here, and not much of it good. You hired a junior software developer who seems to be, overall, doing very well. That's a good start. However, juniors need mentoring to learn and develop their skills. So you've taken a junior developer, who may not have a lot of knowledge and experience in good manual testing techniques, and are ...


15

You have a management problem. And, whether it is true or not, you should explain to them that the time he is spending testing is the reason the code is so good, and since he is still faster than other people, they have two choices: Leave him alone, and hope to keep him for a few years before he figures out his worth and goes where he'll get decent pay. ...


-2

Depending on what kind of testing is involved, it could be good to encourage him to cycle between writing code and testing more often (e.g. write for a week or finish a small portion of the feature, then test it). You mentioned that you found him to be a little hot-headed - perhaps in this case it would be better to attempt to convince management that his ...


1

My personal short version: Senior developers handles any problems that come up without having to ask anyone for help (of course they will ask for help if they know someone else solved a problem before). Mid-level developers handle everything they can reliably and without asking for help. If something is too difficult they go to a senior developer. Something ...


2

Where do companies draw the line between entry-, mid-,senior- etc. level developers? Wherever they want to. The entry positions are mostly the same in all companies, but moving into mid-, senior roles, the variations become quite high. What some consider a senior, others might consider a mid-. As already mentioned in the existing answer, you need to look at ...


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