New answers tagged

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Some of the other answers verge on condescending and preachy. Here's my attempt... How do you determine when you've spent enough time trying to problem solve on your own and now you need to ask a colleague for help? By trial and error, seriously. You need to at least make some attempts at a solution, be able to cogently state your understanding of the ...


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Put the hours in. That's all there is to it. Much like being a top musician†, it takes 1000s of hours of focus to be a programmer. (Note that by "1000s of hours" I mean say 4,000 to 15,000.) 100% of top programmers, and almost all "merely good" programmers, start when they are 10-12 years old - exactly like musicians - because it takes so ...


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Gratulations first to realize where you f*** up in your studies and what you need to fix. Many do not realize it - make sure to tell everyone you ever met not to slack off in his studies. It is likely the most important lesson they can learn. One thing that you seem to be stuck that makes no logical sense is this (and it may well solve the issue): The vibe ...


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Be self-reliant and specific when asking questions First thing you need to remember is that you are not in the university any more. In your workplace, no one is hired to teach you. Sure, you may get some guy to be your mentor, but does not mean he could waste couple hours a day teaching you how to code. Simple rule of thumb is don't bother your colleagues ...


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To get this out of the way first: Imposter Syndrome is real and can affect you whether you realize it or think it's at play or not. My first real software-professional job, I was not really prepared for but I "grew into it". The important thing I want to mention here: In a typical company, more than one person would have been involved in hiring you,...


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As a software developer you probably take pride in the product. It has to be a quality product, except for maybe the occasional one-time throwaway program that you build, right? The manager is not that much different. What is very different is your definition of "one-time throwaway". For the average developer, work is a team effort. We rarely ...


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As a full-stack developer (standard front end stuff, started with HTML/CSS, JS), worked with lots of frameworks, PHP, Python, Java, .NET, I would suggest you stop and think if you know anything about backend before taking on the job. The front end is like the interior decorator. Things do need to work, and things do need to not fall apart, but generally, you ...


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Your question is "How to deal professionally with a manager that does not listen to the expert?" I submit that is the wrong question. Your question assumes that you know better than the manager. However, it is their job to know about the business issues. It is your job to give them the information they need in order to manage your efforts correctly ...


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Imagine you take your car to the mechanic because it's having some engine problems. The mechanic gives you two options. Option A: Thorough fix, $300, the fix won't be done for two days, but it shouldn't require rework. Option B: Quick & dirty fix, $100, the fix will be done later today, but it will fail and you'll have to bring the car back in a few ...


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If you are full stack, and you've not being doing backend work; then please stop calling yourself fullstack. You're a front end developer, and there is a huge demand for skilled ones. Now that you're going to do golang development on the backend, it seems your new employer is asking for skills you fear you might not have. If you really do have these skills,...


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The most important thing to assess in a job is how you are being measured. Your company probably has a bad metric that is being applied; something like lines of code per day (or week). You can rightfully tell them that their metric is bad; but, they won't listen to you because you're on the wrong side of the metric. Instead, they'll hear "I couldn't ...


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How to deal professionally with a manager that does not listen to the expert? You're not the only expert here. Management are trying to balance the quality of the product against the time it takes to ship it. Until the product ships, the company doesn't get paid. And they need a regular income to pay everybody. So it's a delicate balance between developing ...


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I agree with you 100% on the importance of well designed, carefully crafted, reliable code. However, there is only so much you can realistically do to enforce that since it is your manager's job to decide how your implementation process is going to work. There are 2 possible scenarios... 1. Your manager doesn't see the merit of unit testing, design etc. In ...


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Education Take the time to learn more about: The domain (industry) you are in The company you are working for The system you are working on The users of the system Current issues and technical debt Skills relevant to your position The source for all this information can be: Company website Other departments and their publications Ticketing systems you can ...


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Documentation That always gets shorted, and noone likes doing it. You can share your knowledge by writing up the notes while they're fresh in your head. That way the next person has a leg-up and can be effective sooner. Don't assume that you'll remember how it all works after 6 months... We've all been there, or will be someday.


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This sprint/ticket based way of organizing project efforts is not ideal. Project managers are not planning ahead enough and possibly wasting resources. Also leads don't have time to talk to the team? This does not sound good, hopefully it is a temporary situation. If you do not want to bother teammates during a temporary busy period, I think you can use this ...


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I think part of the problem might be this. I can ask the lead dev to take specific tickets out of the backlog but those still have to be refined Ideally tickets should be self-contained, they should be clear and contain all the information needed to work on them. This way developers can work independently on them without having to bug others for extra ...


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I think the most important thing to keep in mind is that this is a numbers game. I have applied for literally hundreds of jobs, and had over 50 interviews during my career. That puts my success rate from application to offer at less than 2%. However, I have always been able to get another job eventually. So you really need to maximise the number of jobs you ...


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This is a fairly common question to occur. Generally look to see if there are any tasks you can do to try help complete the sprint goal. Examples Help get tasks to done: By doing QA for tasks (or helping out QA if you have them in the team) Doing small PR suggestion fixes and tidy up (maybe ask first) Acting on QA for someone elses taks (but ask them first!)...


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What can I do? Talk to your boss. Discuss the ebb and flow of the sprints you have experienced. Then ask "What should I be doing when the board has no more tickets to pick up?" Your boss might know of specific things you can do. Or your boss might tell you to speak with someone else (such as the project or team lead). Or your boss might suggest ...


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Talk to your team lead - there's one of two things happening here: You're exceeding expectations and should be given more tickets, or more complex ones You're not doing enough work on the tickets that you're working on - should there be more analysis, unit testing, documentation that other members of the team are doing that takes up their time? If you're ...


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Disclaimer: I am not a hiring manager nor did my CV's always result in invitations/job offers. I think that a good CV should be short, relevant and readable. This does definitely not mean it should never be more than one page long. With some layouts you get to two pages pretty quickly even when you don't put on that much information. If you obsessively try ...


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Don't Worry About Resume Content; Worry About Resume Depth To help illustrate this, let me tell you the tale of 3 resumes we got from the last time we hired a programmer. Resume A. 5 pages long. From an applicant that graduated college less than a year prior. Resume B. 3 pages long. From an applicant in their 60's that had a long history. Resume C. ...


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As a technical hiring manager, I do not care how long a resume is and welcome more length if it gives me a better idea about the candidate and what they’ve done. My resume’s pretty long given my 27 years in tech and I’m doing pretty well getting jobs. The one and only rule of a resume is keep the reader in mind. A bad long resume can bore me before I get ...


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Would a two-page resume immediately be disqualified from further consideration when seen by a human? This would depend on that human specifically. Some may and some other may not. Is it perhaps even the case that ATS systems are tuned to let go of 2 - page resumes? Yes, could be. However I am sure that it's also likely there are other factors or things ...


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I don't have any authority over him. As dan.mwasuser2321368 stated in his great answer, maybe I'm wrong to think that I do have an authority over him because the management trust me. If no one on your team has the job to review pull requests and potentially reject them. That's a problem. You need to ask your current employer to choose a tech lead for your ...


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My take from reading your question is that there is either a failure of management (the remote coworker is allowed to be egregiously outside the firms standards) or your notion of the firm's standards, and how it operates, are not what they actually are. To point: I'm questioning his ability to deliver a good quality code and I'm also seeing a repeatable ...


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Great question aa! I have been on the other side of the coin, and maybe I can help you improve the communication. But first let's state where my answer is coming from: Most of the information you just mentioned is subjective, even if it's true. It's very difficult to change an engineer's habits, specially at that age (40). You have no control of your ...


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One of the most important statements I picked from your question is: During interviews, I always run out of time before I can come up with an acceptable solution for a coding problem and most questions I faced and struggled with were straight-forward enough to finish within the allotted time. This raises a number of questions for me and I feel you should ...


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This question is quite old, however I want to write an answer presenting a different point of view. There are things that your colleague does not do/does differently than the rest of the team: Not responding to phone calls from the sales team This might be quite detrimental. What if the sales person is with the customer and needs an answer now - and not ...


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Your job is to do your bosses job. Their job is to their bosses job. The boss's job is to do a job for the client. If you are aware and critically asking these questions at this stage of your career, without coming to premature conclusions as to others motives, then you are on the right path.


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To start off with I would very rarely consider any dev with 4 years of experience a true senior. It could be that they have very recently been promoted into the position and have very little mentorship experience. They could even be as new in their role as you are in yours! I would cut him or her a little slack, and just enjoy the unique opportunity you've ...


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It's possible your problem is that you don't know how to solve an interview question. There are a million videos on this from interviewers at every FAANG company, but to give you the TL;DR this is what you need to do: Step 1: Understand the problem. The interviewers often leave a lot of ambiguity in the question they ask, and that's important. They are ...


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I think Snow is right about how to get your foot into the door, but I think you need to do something else to keep your job. Your previous boss said he'd expect you to double or even triple your speed. That is pretty significant. I don't think you did that yet, and I think your new boss might have the same expectations sooner or later. I enjoy coming up with ...


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The answer seems somewhat obvious, but: Practice. You've gone through a few of these tests now and you know what kind of problems are going to be presented to you at the interviews, so you can prepare for those by practicing these exercises. There's doubtless many resources out there to help candidates practice and prepare for technical interviews so go ...


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Senior engineers usually have a lot of "off book" work that isn't very visible, even less visible if you are working remotely and can't see the foot traffic to their desk. You see a tiny sliver of it when you get stuck and ask for help, but you don't see the half hour of research he does before getting back to you, or the three other people who ...


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You may be looking at this the wrong way. You are unlikely to become a better developer by staying within your comfort zone. You should, assuming you want to progress in your craft and your career, grab these opportunities with both hands and relish the chance to tackle bigger and more challenging problems. You will learn and grow much more quickly that way. ...


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There are lots of things that could be happening. Here are some to consider: Maybe your estimation of what is more difficult is just straight-up wrong Maybe the task itself is 'simple' but you don't yet have the necessary business knowledge of all the other systems/processes it has to feed into Maybe the Dev has lots of other important work that needs ...


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Let me restate things a little bit and provide some interpretations: Difficult tasks are being assigned to you. That means people think you can do it. As a junior developer, it seems like you make significant contributions to the project. You can be proud of that. There is lack of support from your senior dev, but other team members fill in the gap. Maybe ...


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Do what you're asked to do, that's your job and that's what you're getting paid to do. Regarding the credit, just be sure to talk about your contributions to the projects in your performance and salary reviews/interviews, and sure, feel free to talk about how much you've done in comparison to others, but make it about how well you find you've been doing and ...


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I'm a .NET developer with 4 years of experience. Now I live and work in Russia. However, I've been thinking of searching a job somewhere abroad (Europe, presumably). It would be nice to get a full-time job with relocation, but a remote one will also be good. Doubts gnaw at me, though. I'm worried that nobody will consider me worth to be hired. Perhaps, it ...


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Right now, due to Covid, everything is more complicated. If you don't find opportunities now, that's not on you. Don't give up, keep trying. Generally speaking, relocating will be seen as the more favorable solution, because you will need a VISA that includes an allowance to work in that country anyway. Even if you physically reside elsewhere, the company is ...


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Whether you are a rockstar or just average, it depends on which company you are going in the future,why would they hire you? Mostly they are looking for skills you have, experiences is sufficient enough, but to stand against over candidates require more than just experience, like your portolio (which you can't show virtually), or certifications. Invest some ...


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He asked if I had a preference in job title between "Software Development Manager" or "Software Architect" - after doing some quick research on average salaries for each I ultimately chose "Software Development Manager". My answer would have been: "Let's not get ahead of ourselves. First, tell me the pay raise that comes ...


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My direct manager mentioned that a "salary adjustment / pay increase" would be involved but that he didn't know the specifics of what would be offered yet. He also indicated that the technology director suggested that they might want to do an "incentivized pay upgrade schedule" - it sounds like pay increases based upon the projects I ...


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I want to add another possibility that has not really been covered by the other answers. Perhaps hinted at, but not explicitly. Obviously, this may not apply in this particular case due to the people being unknown to me, and myself not having the professional credentials to say if it applies either. But: People with a certain "mental makeup" are ...


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You would like to see more initiative in working from high level requirements. Your co-worker would apparently prefer the certainty and security of having very detailed marching orders before they begin the implementation journey Perhaps you can find a middle strategy that's a path of growth, specifically: Ask this person to take a try at interpreting the ...


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One of the terms you can search for more information is called "task relevant maturity". It sounds like your guy is very mature within his certain tasks. But other tasks (like design) require and entirely different skill set. If you want to help someone transition into a new set of skills, you need to identify the skills that are essential to that ...


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The first thing you need to do is stop assuming that you know best for others. From everything you've laid out, this developer is perfectly happy where he is; he has found his place in the world. Why do you seek to push him out of it? Not everyone wants to be the next Elon Musk. Not everyone wants to put up with the responsibilities and stress and ...


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Whilst the other answers here are really good, what you have described here is a common scenario that I use to explain to my junior team members when I on board them: With enough experience, many of us can become great programmers, some of us may also become good developers. A good programmer knows their language and tools and how to use them to write code ...


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