80

Proceed with caution Many answers here have said "sure, go ahead and say something, just don't be judgey". I want to emphasize that anything you say could be interpreted as being judgmental even if it's not meant that way. Consider, for one thing, that some fraction of the colleagues may feel that they are being "edgy" or "transgressive" in some sense ...


79

on what basis does this level gets calculated, obviously years but how exactly? I'm going to challenge your assertion here - "years of experience" is in many cases a terrible measure of a developer. I've worked with developers who after 10 years of "experience" are still not much above junior level and still need handholding through their tasks, and ...


25

There’s no fixed definition. In general, junior = needs hand holding, mid-level can do things on their own if not too difficult, senior = can handle any problem. So where do see yourself on that scale? But since there is no fixed definition, you can apply, go to an interview, and see if you match their expectations.


19

I estimate around eight hours and it is likely an underestimate. That's ridiculous. If you need them to sit for an 8 hour code test then you ought to pay them the hourly equivalent for the position they're testing for. If you're not willing to do that than reduce the length of the test by 75%.


15

I think she can wait for some time and keep her own good use of vocabulary. After a while people will learn about her decorum and then she can start with her endeavor to bring positive change.


12

As someone who hires a lot of software developers, I'd tell you to give the same non-answer everyone else does. "I was looking for new challenges. Or I wanted to work in a shop that used such-and-such technology, like yours." We really don't put nearly as much thought into why you left previous jobs as you are thinking. That is, unless there is a repeated ...


9

Is it acceptable for her to politely mention to her new colleagues that she feels uncomfortable with hearing swearing? In a good team, everyone should be comfortable bringing up what makes them feel uncomfortable. However, I also read this post which was from coworkers who were annoyed that their new colleague was trying to change the culture. The ...


9

This is a bit of a false dilemma. You should bring two things to your meeting: A reasoned point of view on areas you think the team needs to improve on to meet OKR A personal plan on how you will improve collaboration with U Frankly, judging the skill level of U is not your concern. You need to understand that there is a very real chance that U was ...


8

"My tasks are going well, I've made good progress. X's tasks are taking longer though." There are two possibilities here: either it's factually correct or not. If it is correct, than you did indeed mis=manage your time. It's nice to help other people, but as long as your boss doesn't explicitly makes this part of your goals and metrics, it's not your job. ...


8

Tell your IT support. Let them know that you were cleaning and accidentally knocked a heavy object onto the screen. The computer is functional, you are able to work, but the screen is definitely damaged. Ask what you can do to help with getting it fixed. Accept responsibility and let them know. I've been in tech support for multiple years, and the ...


8

If you can't mention cold hard numbers, percentages are the obvious way to communicate the scale of change. In fact, I'd argue that knowing the relative change can be more impactful - for example knocking $1,000 off a budget doesn't seem huge in real terms but present it as a 33% reduction on a $3.000 budget, well that's much more impressive. The other ...


8

There is no universally applicable definition. But in general it's usually understood like this: Junior: New in the technology. Can only solve basic problems without assistance. Might not yet be aware of all the possibilities the technology has to offer. Might require mentoring to achieve their full potential. Mid-level: Proficient in the technology. Can ...


8

Eight hours is far too long for a weekend When I was applying for jobs, I had to do a few of these. I was a young, single, no need to work while in school person. And I would have found eight-hour tests to be problematic. Especially since it will probably take 12. I had no obligations back then and still might not have been able to squeeze that in around ...


7

I agree with the others that a failed venture is generally not looked at negatively, but there is one more important aspect that I feel needs to be said. You mentioned that if you feel the project isn't going anywhere after a year you may look for other work. In an interview, you will need to be able to show what you worked on, and explain what you did for ...


7

I do not find any negative aspect of being an entrepreneur in the past. That been said: You don't know who is going to be your future employer and you can always find an employer who thinks it is negative. There are some positions that are a better fit for a non-ambitious person. You probably do not want to join a company in either of those cases.


7

Is it acceptable for her to politely mention to her new colleagues that she feels uncomfortable with hearing swearing? Certainly. It shouldn't ever be a problem to politely bring up that a certain behavior is making you uncomfortable. Doesn't mean the other side is going to do anything about it, but at least they'll be aware. It's possible that these people ...


7

IMO, you're making much ado about nothing. First, as to your response time - You're not on the recruiters time clock or payroll. He/She doesn't know what your schedule is like. He/She doesn't even know if they sent the email to a valid address. He/She is probably happy just to have gotten a response. The recruiter is a stranger, reaching out to you ...


6

Is it acceptable? Yes. Is it justified? Debatable. Is it a good idea? Not hardly. Swearing may be seen as inappropriate, but it is acceptable. Inappropriate behavior takes place every day, from disrespecting a colleagues time to taking undue credit for others work. You could speak with your manager or colleagues, and they'll most likely change their ...


6

If I can share some of his burden (exchange tasks) (I prefer this), or If he also work for payment, so I can pay him Suggest option one, not two. If he's normally your sponsor, do not offer to pay him. We are in Vietnam (different cities). I can afford around $20. His day job is full-stack web dev. At that rate, you'd just insult him. Also, ...


6

Should Citizens & Green Card holders lie about their visa status on job applications? No. Don't lie. Most employers prefer not to offer jobs to liars.


6

Some companies are struggling with a dissonance between theory and practice. In theory, all hours on the timesheet must be billable, either on an external or an internal customer. But in practice, they just don't have enough billable tasks for everyone. How is that problem solved in practice? In some organizations, people just cheat. Off-time gets ...


5

Will it reflect poorly on me profesionally if I would still take the training and hand in my notice, 3 months if that's relevant Not your problem, not your money. It's just the costs of running a company, so really nothing new. As an employee, you are not shareholder. You have no responsibility on how they spend the money. You should only do whatever ...


5

You don't mention where in the world your colleague is working, although I'm assuming from the mention of Fortune 500 that it's probably in the US. Nevertheless, I'll offer the Australian perspective. Profanity is part of the Australian culture, including its professional culture. It's not unusual for s**t, f**k (and derivatives) and c**t to be used ...


5

Assuming you've already checked with your manager and there really is nothing on your plate, as a software engineer, the first thing that comes to mind is software improvements: fix or at least investigate bugs (if there are no bugs assigned to you, see if you can fix anything that has been bothering you) implement small wishlist features refactoring and ...


4

I'm not sure if your friend is ethically justified in joining a group and changing its culture to suit their taste. Why should their subjective sensibilities take priority over those of the majority where there are conflicts? Yes, some compromise is to be expected with certain norms, but swear words are, frankly, most likely harmless to the people in this ...


4

As always, start with asking your manager if there is something you should be working on in that time. If you don't get enough direction from your manager, the next thing I would look into is learning something new. Learn a new language, a new framework, a new technology, a new use for your tools/product. All of these will make you better as a software ...


3

I was in a similar spot to you - I had two years of a PhD before I left and tried to find jobs and quickly found myself in the spot of immediate rejections. I would like to know your advice that with my skills... This is the central problem - your skills likely don't line up with what the job market wants (outside of academia). Academia skills are meant ...


3

You should probably focus on your contribution and what you did. Lets take fixing the bug that would have cost money. What are the chances any of your colleagues would have fixed that bug just the same you did? Was it just chance who ducked last when the supervisor dealt issues to fix to each of you? And why was it 5%? Would it have been only 4% if someone ...


3

Succeed or fail, I don't see how entrepreneurship could be looked at negatively. Anyone who would see it negatively is probably a fool.


3

In some countries, the title "Engineer" is protected by law, you must have obtained the corresponding degree. I would advise you to label your expertise as: Data Science - Aerospace Electrical Engineering - Software development This would leave the possible issue aside and the result would almost be the same.


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