202

Did she basically tell me to look for another company? If this is your main and only question, I will just answer that instead of telling you what you should do. It is impossible to tell with complete confidence what she meant when she told you what she told you. However, I would interpret more as: "Stop complaining, focus on your work by looking at ...


156

If it is your personal property then you have every right to ask him to return it. Ask now to give him time to sort his own replacement or you might consider selling it to him.


150

Unfortunately maintenance is the rule when working in IT, very rarely are there new projects, and people get reassigned around projects regularly. And while the quality of the code you will have to maintain in your professional life will vary widely, they will never smell the same as a fresh 2-6 month old project. However, there are things you can do to ...


115

If you're dealing with someone that has problems with social interaction and social cues, one thing to do is ask yourself: Do they comply with instructions? The reason I ask that is because... well, some people are just jerks. It's not that they can't understand interpersonal aspects - they simply don't care. However, from the sounds of it, your coworker ...


85

In terms of how to prep for interviews, the best thing to do is to research these topics yourself, and work on personal projects that use them. For example, my first software job was similar, we didn't engage in any good practices and they were hard to implement. So I worked on private projects, where I could do what I want and had the time. In those ...


57

One of the things that happens during the notice period is that the company claims all its property back, and the employee claims all their property back. Many companies even have a formal process for getting the departing employee to turn over the laptop, phone, key, and credit card... Now it is possible that it hasn't occurred to your local manager that ...


53

Get this straight - A review is not a criticism. It also captures the success stories - more importantly, which actions lead to success for certain person / scenarios. Remember, all feedback are constructive: Negative feedback provides us with the action points to work upon to improve Positive feedback recognizes the efforts that went in and sets examples ...


50

Am I subtly told to resign? In this case: Why / what does it matter? Always remember: HR is not our friend, they will always try to protect the company's interest. In this case, HR sees (or, you are portrayed as) you as someone who is complaining, and given that you started the process "anonymously" and got exposed later - somehow depicts either of two: ...


49

Yes it is reasonable to tell your manager you are not enjoying your work and to ask for something fun. It is also reasonable for that manager to ask you to stick it out. There is a job that needs to be done and the job can't be all fun all the time. A good manager will realize that they are burning your usefulness and willingness to work for them and will ...


48

I've been in this situation recently. At my previous gig, we worked on a very old code base (some java 1.2/1.3 compliant code); code was full of magic numbers and magic strings used to access Object references from Vector's which were then cast; no unit tests, barely any integration testing, none of it automated; little to no time allocated to refactoring ...


42

All great answers above. In short yes, you are told to deal with it or resign I'm a senior developer now (10+ years) but I've been through this stage of struggle in personal development. If you've had regular formal reviews, it is a common practice to belittle your achievements and exaggerate your failures, which usually means another yellow/red flag to ...


37

Basically, you've gotten yourself stuck where you don't want to be because you've been worrying about what other people expect of you. It's time to stop doing what other people tell you too, and to start the career path that you want to follow and be happy. Now, you have three years experience as a developer - it might not be the tech stack you want, and ...


27

My question: would it be reasonable to ask my manager to put me on another project because I really dislike the work I need to do now and how do I tell this? No it would not be reasonable. Part of being a programmer is maintaining existing programs whether its adding/removing features or fixing errors. You were lucky to have worked on some projects that ...


26

I believe that the message was more like, "We aren't going to be able to restructure every aspect of your work experience to your satisfaction, so if you're serious about these complaints, you should just move on." So it may be a gentle attempt to get to commit to dealing with the reality of things staying as they are or commit to leaving, but I wouldn't ...


22

I have wasted 3 starting years of my career. Is there any way to start over? You have not lost any years, you learned many things. http://norvig.com/21-days.html is providing a mind-provoking insight. And you need to read Bullshit jobs, it is mind provoking and covers quite well software development jobs, since most software projects (more than half of them)...


22

Age doesn't matter. Experience does however, and a young age implies inexperience. You've been working, total, for less than a year. That's nothing in the grand scheme of things, and, without wishing to be too blunt, they're correct when they say you likely don't have enough experience. Chances are you'll look back in, say, 5 or 10 years time, and realise ...


21

Sadly, you have no other choice than to grit your teeth and continue to do your work. Follow any work related instructions, do your tasks and continue to be the same reliable and thorough employee that you have been before your resignation (but of course only up to a certain level of "caring about"; above that, see point 3) in the paragraph below). Also, if ...


18

When I explained the mistake, he angrily yelled at me and said "If you use a comma delimited string as a SQL parameter on the website again, I will beat you senseless" This also makes me sad and angry. A teachable moment between you and the senior developer that was completely wasted. No mistake deserves this kind of treatment. It's completely ...


17

You don't owe them anything after the end of your employment, and it's not your responsibility to teach them that. Hand in your resignation, work professionally during your notice period, and then move on to the next opportunity. You're leaving a job, it's perfectly fine to do that, and you'll do it many more times during your career.


16

You can always ask, but they can always say no, too. Unless you have it in your contract that you will only work on projects you like, they can put you on projects as they see fit. You could document the changes you would want to make (refactoring, writing documentation, ...) and the benefits for the company in terms of time gained through less bugs. Or ...


15

You did a co-worker a personal favor - ask for the phone back the same way you would if you had lent it to an acquaintance outside of work. If your colleague wants to hold on to the phone a bit longer, or seems frustrated that you want it back, it's up to you whether you insist on the phone's return or let him/her continue to use it. Focus on leaving on ...


15

You are discriminating against your employee because you think he is autistic (you don't mention that he has been diagnosed with any documented disability, so this just your armchair diagnosis to begin with). As an autist and a manager myself, you have to treat your autistic employee the same as your neurotypical employees. Instead, you appear to be giving ...


14

My problem is that I feel guilty pawning this project onto a colleague. I don't want bad blood between us. Should I confront him an apologize? I don't see any compelling reason for you to have to apologize (for what?) with this coworker. You already delayed an important family event to attend the first time, and managed to postpone it to another date. A ...


11

If they're like some companies I've worked for, that's when they can find an available time for everyone. They probably don't prefer the time...it's just when they can get a free hour for everyone. Don't like it? Speak up directly and tell them this isn't a good time, or block your time on the calendar


11

This sounds like a developer that either is insecure of their own abilities or doesn't recognise there is no One True Way to work. There are a few things you can do to deal with it depending on what your objective is. If you just want to be left alone and don't care about dealing with this person, you can say something like "what works for me, works for me" ...


11

I am thinking about telling him that I am not happy with what’s going on and explain why I am unhappy. Any thoughts? What would you expect to accomplish by telling your manager that you are not happy? If you just want to talk, and get his take on the situation, then it makes a lot of sense. If you expect him to stop doing what his managers say, then ...


11

Great reviews are balanced (address both strengths and potential growth areas), specific (address specific behaviors, not general attitudes), and include evidence (anecdotes of the behaviors discussed). Part of your job as a reviewer is to identify opportunities for your manager to improve, even if minor behaviors. Everyone could always do something ...


11

Going to throw in another interpretation: There are issues in the company. There are reasons for those issues, as we have previously discussed. We can't magically make them go away, so either be part of the solution, adapt, be silent (not specifically mentioned as an option), or go away. Complainers accomplish little. It sounds like you've already spoken ...


11

As someone who will be going through a series of internships in the next few years, how can I capitalize on this? How can I phrase a request to my supervisor for them to; put an endorsement on my linkedin, or write a paragraph that I can put in a longform CV I make available to employers I apply to? And what sorts of things should I ask my ...


10

I was promised that every major issue in project organization was resolved, so now developers do not overwork, have direct communication to the clients. The only choice I have it either to try and confirm that Project B organization was really changed and I will like working on Project B or quit. From your statement, it appears that you have raised your ...


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