164

Question: How to properly justify a team increase given that we don't have an output issue? (we are delivering in an acceptable manner already) Stop working overtime and see if your team can still deliver in an acceptable manner. By working overtime, you are simply adding hours of work to each member of the team, which is not much different than those ...


116

This is a very graceful exit This isn't being Fired. A lot of people use "fired" as casual slang for any layoff, but that's wrong and don't go around saying that. Fired is you do something bad, like embarrass the company on social media, and a security guard watches you pack your things. This isn't even a layoff, where you're also escorted out of the ...


38

A nearby team (of 4 members), whose output is poor, got an additional member. This is a potential red flag for me. Of course, some of the times, the output deficiency is due to not having enough staff, in which case it makes sense to add headcount and continue monitoring output. But if there's a more general pattern of rewarding poor-performing teams with ...


37

Maybe not what you want to read, but being able to read and understand code is a VERY important skill for a developer and fixing (and searching for) bugs is an excellent opportunity to improve this ability. Moreover, coding is not about writing code, but about thinking how to write good, maintainable and efficient code. I suppose this is a pretty complex (...


35

What would you do? I would make a list of all these logins and offer to help the person who was tasked with changing all of them. As each password change was completed (by the other person, using passwords unknown to me), I would cross it off the list. During my final month, I would send the updated list with each of my weekly status reports, and then the ...


28

I'll make Gregory's comment into an answer: You don't owe anyone anything. Just announce that you'll be leaving as of X date so nobody gets caught by surprise. The circumstances and details of you leaving are your business and your business only. You can give more details in a private setting to friends and colleagues you trust, but only as much as you ...


25

TBH, you come off as a little bit entitled in your question. "I can't listen to spotify." "I can't download software from the internet." "I'm bored with my tasks. They don't give me anything exciting to work on." "They get upset if I arrive late." Well... the company doesn't exist to make you happy. They don't exist to fulfill your ...


14

From your comments you knew from 11am that the work was complete, yet the PM was unavailable until 3PM, and as such could have contacted the relevant people to alert them when they were available. That didn't happen. You did, however, contact another Project Manager. There are two faults here - firstly, you didn't inform the actual project manager. ...


14

Contact the right people HR, and there somebody that is truly engaged in wellbeing and has the power drive the change A senior manager that has enough experience and authority The source of the tasks Do not undervalue soft power. A manager that is not necessarily that senior in the hierarchy can have seniority from the years of working valued, sometimes ...


10

You are indeed vulnerable to that kind of accusation. However, this is partly a mess of your own making, because you have not used good security practices so far. You know that, and I won't belabor it. Generally there are three types of security model for a service-oriented web site. One login (account/password) for the corporate account. All the ...


8

Are you sure you want to step back? If you had time, would you do the assignment? If so, you can write something like: Due to personal reasons, I won't have time to work on your assignment within the given timeframe. I am interested in working for your company and would like to request an extension to $date. If you just want to withdraw your ...


8

You could be honest, there is nothing wrong with asking how much you will be paid, though maybe an headhunter doesn't even know this kind of information, but you could try with something like this: "Thank you for contacting me, I appreciate the offer. I would like to know more about it. What is the annual salary? The technologies I will use? etc..." You ...


7

It's probably best to assume that you're colleagues had no bad intentions. This may or may not be the case, but it seems best to give them some credit. As Patricia Shanahan pointed out in the comments, it may well be that the other person asked them proactively. My suggestion is not to focus on the missed project in the past, but try to become part of the ...


7

There are 2 sides in a software company. Dev and sales. The dev team are the ones responsible for delivering the product. Sales needs to sell it to people. You can get good sales people who take the time to learn what is possible with the product and how long certain aspects of dev can take (rare as hen's teeth), and then there is the rest of sales. Known ...


7

The state of project is not really relevant here. The points you need to consider here are: Are you satisfied with the work and compensation here? Do you see value in the work you do? Is you work/effort valued? Did you try to talk / discuss the scenario/ situation you're currently in with higher-ups and received no positive sign? If the answers of first ...


6

Say Dear Employer, I have decided not to continue with my application for x. Thanks, You. Avoid adding qualifiers like 'at this time', 'currently', etc. No need to actually reference the assignment. They all provide wiggle room for negotiation. Unless you are open to negotiation. Sounds like you are not. That's ok. Hence short and sweet.


6

Small teams are harder to justify a new team member because the increase in team size is greater. In your case, you are asking for a 50% increase in team size, relative to that other team which only received a 25% increase in size. Unfortunately, unless you are consistently working more than 10-20% overtime each, that 50% bump is just going to be hard. What ...


6

You need to determine your actual capacity, make a list of all the tasks with their sizes, show the decision makers that list with a line drawn between what will fit and what won't, and ask them to decide where to cut. It's their job to decide whether it's more important to save money on staffing or to finish more projects. It's your job to make sure they ...


6

I cannot tell you which choice to make, but I can give you pertinent insight. The clearance doesn't just "look good on your resume". It makes you worth more money. Jobs that require clearances pay more. The solution to contracts running out, if you go that route, is to keep six months in the bank. You assume that you will get laid off, and you use that ...


6

Normally a week's notice is required, but they offered me up to a month, which I took Good, use it to prepare well and find a job where you don't have an expectation mismatch. My managers were discreet about the whole thing, offered a reference, and I was allowed to announce that I would be leaving. What's happened is already past, but you have a good ...


6

To expand on a comment from @Flater: This is totally expected You haven't mentioned how long you've had the job, but a standard way of "ramping up" new team members (especially new graduates!) is to have them work on nothing but bugs for a while. This allows them to get familiar with the code base without the additional complexity and deadlines of trying ...


6

Speaking as a hiring manager in Australia, I can’t say that I’ve ever gone looking for a candidate’s SE account. I have gone looking up GitHub though.


5

At this point if things are running smoothly your manager doesn't have any reason to change things. What you should do as you read code and fix bugs is look for opportunities for improving the existing code. Not "features", but cases where there's repeated code, fragile code, whatever. Think about "why" the bugs are occurring, rather than just fixing them....


5

In many sensitive workplace situations, people will want details. You may worry that they will jump to conclusions if you don't provide them. However, it's important to keep two things in mind. First, some people will jump to conclusions even if you give them details. You can't hope to control what other people think. So, be true to yourself. Secondly, it's ...


5

You have cited two problems here : You are demotivated by being alone in the office Struggling with the amount of work One solution would be to solve those two problems at once, by telling your management that you are struggling with the amount of work you have, and need helping hands. If you're willing you could volunteer to train to the technology you ...


5

Is there value in recruitment messages? Short answer: actually, no. Long answer: (see below). I'm assuming it is a weak fact to vouch for a raise or promotion Your assumption is very good. Even worse, the company might become "sad" that you are not loyal enough, and not treat you adequately as a result. can sharing an information like "I'm actively ...


4

You might want to consider that your closest coworkers already know you are underperforming. They might disagree about your potential performance, given enough time, but they are more directly aware of your current performance than your manager is. If you are evasive about your reason for leaving, they will draw their own conclusions. There's little reason ...


4

There are couple of things to be noted: You were fired but the manager/company did you a favor when they gave you a recommendation and time to apply for a new job. So that's completely professional on their part. By saying that you were fired doesn't affect you or the people working at the company so there is nothing wrong telling people that you were fired....


4

Ask your boss if you can be involved with some of the new features, as well as bug fixing. You probably don't know your way around the company code well enough yet to write something big on your own, but you could be part of a team working in a new area, at least some of the time. Everyone wants to work on new features, no one likes bug fixing old code, ...


4

You already received some answers that the problem is "sales". That is only one side of the problem. I work(ed) almost 20 years in on-demand-software, and I saw the issue over and over again. Sometimes the same thing happens even when there is no sales-department involved. It is an organizational culture at management level, that they must do the impossible ...


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