247

Mistakes happen to all of us. The key thing is to understand them, learn from them, and avoid them the next time. According to your question, you and the company did all the steps needed. On top of that, you also acknowledge your error I've made sure to acknowledge I was the one who introduced the particular code which had the bug I feel that an apology ...


196

Do not sign anything more from your current employer for any reason. You’re doing well there. Block them all on LinkedIn and social media. Do not share any further information about your future plans, even “not the same industry”, with them. “That’s none of your business” is answer enough, and they have been unprofessional enough you’d be justified in not ...


137

It is normal to be on multiple projects for many companies. Your problem is your personal organisation of your work. You need to keep the projects separated. I am to work on both these projects without any additional pay. So long as you are working the same hours, this is totally normal unless your contract stipulates otherwise.


123

No, this was the team's mistake, not just yours It sounds like where you work has a multi-step process to get changes to production - that's good. It means that any mistake passed review by multiple people. Yes, you made a mistake, but so did the other engineers and QA, who didn't test for this either. Anyone could have made that mistake, and it just ...


75

I suggest you contact a lawyer and lay out what your former employer is doing. What's going on here would seem to be a type of harassment. They may be able to write up a letter which can be forceful enough to cause the company to cease their negative behaviour towards you.


51

It is very common to have two or more projects on the go at the same time. You need to learn how to manage it. Talk to your manager about how much time you should be devoting to each project. Once you know how much time to spend on each, decide how you are going to divide up your time across the day. For example, you might decide to spend a morning on one ...


29

Aside from what you’ve already been doing, I recommend not updating your LinkedIn with your new employer until after you pass your probation there. You should also block new connection notifications on your linkedin and try to avoid connecting with new colleagues for a while, if possible.


25

Stop trying to own your employees' personal lives. What they do outside the 8 hours a day you're paying them for is none of your business.


20

No, absolutely not. If your development process is such, that a single person's mistake causes a problem in production, then you have a problem with your process. Focus on getting that general problem resolved, rather than obsessing over the individual bug. The last thing you want to do is to contribute to a culture in which blame for production bugs gets ...


17

I always thought they were considered a pro as employees train themselves. I am not a software manager but my understanding, at least where I have worked, is that side projects are viewed as a benefit as employees train themselves outside of work hours rather than requiring on the job training.


17

Do you have a non-compete signed already? If no, and you don't sign this new one; then tell them to go pound sand. Do not sign anything, you have no obligation to sign paperwork from them and doing so can only hurt you. You owe them absolutely nothing and they way they're acting is honestly insane. If you've signed an offer letter with the next company and ...


14

You don't ever mention somebody else's salary. Don't bring it up, no matter what. You are your own person and the focus should always be on you and the value that you bring to the table. But you do use that information to judge what the company is willing to pay people in your role, how much you should negotiate for, and how firmly you should stand your ...


13

Since they offer you several choices, it's okay to ask. As an IT Domain Manager, I would (and do) find it immature if someone request a better computer that what we have, especialy if the employee isn't IT related or doesn't have special needs (ex : dev). This is the case where there are no choice. When I propose multiple computer model to an user and if he/...


11

Many people would add points for someone doing some other programming in their free time, showing they are interested. From time to time I have "donated" code that I've written in my spare time to the company, so they definitely benefit from that. Or I know solutions to problems from my private work. Other people just don't care what people do in ...


10

It's absolutely normal.. but how you manage it depends on the various client's relations with your company. You should absolutely tell your manager (if they don't already know) that the client is requesting changes and how long each of those changes are taking. Your company can then either push back on the client or bill them appropriately. Your management ...


10

I seriously want to look for a new role in the upcoming weeks but I’m not sure how how much indication I should give of my unhappiness of the situation during my end of probation review. I certainly don’t want to just quit without having another job offer so what advice would people have about what how I express my concerns about the role to my boss? How ...


9

These things happen. Sooner or later some more critical bugs make it into production. All these meetings and hassle that you and your team have gone through is not about a blame game like who made it or who didn't test this, etc. The reason for all meetings and so on is all to learn from and see how it can be prevented from happening in the future. Do you ...


8

The following assumes you have already nicely raised this issue to your boss, and that you inform them when you are done your tasks and ask them for something else to do and those requests go unheeded. If not, that would be the first thing to do: When you are done your 2-hour task, send your boss a message and ask them if there's anything else you can ...


8

My interpretation of your employer's actions is not so much that they will be taking legal action against you (despite what they claim), but that they will be threatening your new employer, either legally, or business-wise. If the threats against your new employer are strong enough, your new employer may rescind your employment offer. They are either ...


8

Use their unprofessional LinkedIn activity against them Since they are currently (and improperly) surveilling your LinkedIn profile for the answer to a particular question, use that against them. Create a flurry of LinkedIn activity that seems to answer their question. For instance, add 5 new friends all from the same company (that isn't the company you are ...


7

It's all company dependent, as you state in your question. Depending on your role, it may be preferable to have you be able to come to the office in person periodically as opposed to always being remote. There's also implications of tax when you reside in other countries and work from another one that your current company may not be willing to take on, ...


6

We can't tell for sure, but propably no. 12 tables with 10-15 entries means little to us. This could be highquality data with straightforward usecases, or it could be a can of worms already. Was data missing, did you have to do extra steps because of bad dataquality. Is the db scheme sound, or does it have quirks already? Did you get clear requirements, I ...


6

You have correctly identified that Team Bob is avoiding accountability by not leaving a written record of their behavior. However, Team Alice is not at the mercy of Team Bob when it comes to documenting things, because Team Alice can create a written record, too. For instance, when important matters are discussed face to face, put this in writing after the ...


6

If they insist so much to find out who is the new employer probably they want to contact one of their managers and start a discussion on the style don't dare to hire one of my employees any more. This things often end up amicably, but they could also get nasty, nobody will ever tell anything to you about it, but the mood around you might change, so you ...


6

If they are asking you to make a choice, wanting to have the relevant information upon which one would assess the options would not be considered pushy or unprofessional. I would expect they'd have specs handy and doubt you would be the first to ask.


5

You deserve to be paid what you are worth. If you are not being paid what you are worth and your colleague is, that makes the negotiation a lot easier: "I have looked at the going rate in the market and it seems the market rate for someone of my skill level is X, and I'm being paid Y; I would like to be paid X if I join the company" (you can do ...


5

A PhD in the UK now has strong emphasis on employability outside academia, as we have so many PhDs and nowhere near as many faculty positions. What you, and your potential future employers will be wanting are "transferable skills". For example, giving presentations, independent working, teaching others, writing, ability to learn quickly, networking....


5

So, you equate WFH to include going to a separate country, hoping that your VPN will work, that medical and taxes are all okey-dokey, data-protection laws between home and away country are compatible, physical protection of work laptop, and time-zone differences are of little relevance? Does that sound about right? If you were a small-business owner, would ...


5

Once you start the new job you won't be able to keep it a secret for ever! The question isn't whether you can keep the old company in ignorance, it's whether their non-compete argument has any validity. From what you tell us, they seem to be acting quite unreasonably. But, with respect, that's quite normal when we only hear YOUR side of the argument! You ...


5

Completely normal. the workload of a singly IT project fluctuates, so you will usually get assigned several with staggered starts and deadlines, to prevent you getting in a lull with nothing to do (which is expensive for the company and boring for the employee). Usually, you work on a single project on a single day, but sometimes things happen that require ...


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