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114

If it's a one-time thing, do the testing. Your team needs you. QA is drowning. Take over some of their workload and stay in contact with them to make sure you do the job, and you do it well. After having proven yourself as someone who can be relied on in a pinch, you can then tell your manager man do I hate manual testing, and maybe they'll keep that in ...


103

What you describe comes across to me as blatant sexual harassment. I recommend having a private 'chat' with this colleague, where you make it clear that you consider their behavior to be harassment and if they persist, then you will not hesitate to take the matter up with your Manager and HR. This is their opportunity to avoid it turning into a formal ...


82

The transgender part of this doesn't actually matter, so don't let the other party make it matter I'm really hesitant to go to HR (we have one) because I know that the world is really pro-trans these days (which is fine) and I don't know how the company will handle it ("HR is not your friend" and all). The way to deal with that, is to simply not ...


75

Two issues. Your taxes and quitting. ...it's been more than 5 months of overtime money that has not been paid and there are no benefits whatsoever, sometimes the salary can be late. [...] And I did not sign any contract when I was told that I was a permanent employee, only verbal statements and congratulations. If you are in the United ...


51

Check that the "multi billion dollar finance company" is actually your formal employer I am not sure where you are located, but here in Canada, there are a variety of companies pitching jobs at with "billion dollar companies" like "Morgan Stanley" or "RBC" or "Citigroup" which are not genuinely jobs at those companies, but rather contract positions. I got ...


50

In this case, feel absolutely free Loyalty demands a certain amount of reciprocity, i.e. the employer must treat you reasonably. Being overworked, having lousy project management (getting that far behind is the evidence of that), not getting paid for overtime, sometimes not getting paid until late, and being unable to sleep all each individually qualify as ...


38

may I resign in the middle of this project? The answer to this question is always "Yes" There is never a good time to resign, it will always be an inconvenience of one kind or another. However, that inconvenience is not your problem; your problem is that your employment arrangement is no longer convenient for you. The project status is your employer's ...


32

Warn her that you consider what she is doing is harassment. Document it. If she stops fine, but if not go to HR. If you get no satisfaction there, then seek advice of an employment attorney. This person is being a bully and trying to make you conform to their view of the world. There is no difference between this behavior or the more traditional forms ...


26

You should do the testing. In addition to all the workplace related reasons that its a good idea to do it, consider the development benefits (i.e., to you) of doing such functional testing. There's a good chance you'll notice new bugs or quirks that need to be fixed as you run through the product in a way that's different from how you normally use it. ...


26

My question - Should I expect the management to be completely honest about the burn rate and runway length? You should expect management to be exactly the same way they have been so far. If they have been completely honest and open about the burn rate so far, if they were completely honest and open about the upcoming redundancies, then you should expect ...


24

I have done this for a few decades now, especially when changing countries, which is the norm for me (companies are reluctant to pay expenses for me to fly for interview, often intercontinental). Normally, the team lead spends 29 minutes explaining the project and then comes the interview - "do you think that you can help us?". Two points to note: I have *...


22

It's pretty normal to keep the hard and fast details of burn rate and runway from employees, especially if you're trying to turn it around and secure more funding. View yourself in the shoes of the startup founder. They've hit a tight spot maybe and need everything to go right to proceed. To have a viable pathway towards more funding and eventual success, ...


18

While sudden onset gender dysphoria is a thing, it sounds as if your coworker may be projecting a bit. I've known very masculine women, and I've known very effeminate men. It doesn't mean that they are trans, or gay, or anything else. This is clearly harassment on your coworker's part, and while typically HR IS NOT YOUR FRIEND, it may already be past ...


14

It's unethical. In the companies I worked damage prevention was highly valued "oh that would have been very expensive, if we wouldn't have catched this now". And the fact that you reviewed all the specs again and found that issue in the first place , would make you a very valuable employee. But If I would ever find out that you hid that to make you look ...


14

Should I be concerned and if so, what should I be doing? It is normal for an exodus to start sometimes. And devs are especially prone to moving on due to the nature of their work and temperaments. In your case you basically just got there and you're as junior as it gets. Stay and ride it out, there's plenty of room for advancement and you can analyse whats ...


12

Put it simply the reasons are there are a lot of lessons that don't align with my interest... and because i want to be a web/software engineer. An engineering education is much more about understanding what code you should not write, than it is about learning to write code that "works" in the near term. If you just want to build things, that's what your ...


12

There's advice from Joel Spolsky, beloved co-founder and ex-CEO of the StackExchange network. He has written blog articles with names like: Top Five (Wrong) Reasons You Don’t Have Testers Why testers? You can read those and present some of the arguments to your boss. No matter how hard it is to find testers, they are still cheaper than programmers. A ...


12

I have been hired based on a 30-minute telephonic interview. I was referred to the position, so they were confident about the skills I possess. So, it's not an entirely impossible scenario. But, it is in your best interest to request a visit to the office and talking with your future manager or team before making a decision. It is not unreasonable and they ...


12

It's not your code. If you developed it during work time, it belongs to your employer, not you. You cannot legally open source it. Your employer can, but not you. If you think it should be open sourced, you should talk to your manager about it, but because you wrote it for them, it's their call, not yours. The answer to your main question: it's not one ...


10

You are right to be careful. If you were screened that way, it also means the others on your team were screened the same way. That is definitely a red flag. However, some companies don't screen their candidates very carefully. What they do is assess their skills on the job and if the new employee doesn't work out, they fire him/her within the probationary ...


10

1 The lead developer (not my boss) openly subscribes to the thinking that a lack of documentation is a form of job security. As a result, nothing is written down. 2 The manager (my boss, who is technical) is seemingly unmotivated and uninterested in the work. He takes every Friday off and spends the rest of the time in his office. When I have asked ...


8

No particular engineer is responsible for any given part of the code. Rather, everyone as a group is responsible for all of the code. Nothing abnormal about this, being able to work in a team is a good thing anyway. Resumes work best with tangible accomplishments and saying that one was "part of" something doesn't provide evidence of my individual ...


7

You asked, What I am concerned about is, is there something wrong with the company or the team? It's hard for us to answer that, because what counts as "wrong" will vary. Which brings us to the heart of the matter here. Interviews are meant to be two-way streets. The company evaluates your fitness for the position, and you should be evaluating the ...


7

You might think your "job" is to be a developer. It is not that simple. It is bring any skills and abilities you can to serve the business and the customer. It happens that as the business sells software, that usually means it needs people to write code. But: Software that is not tested (somehow, ideally automatically) is useless because it is guaranteed ...


7

Just Do It... You are being asked to do manual testing because you did not help automate the testing. Be glad that it is painful and something that you don't like to do. Hopefully, all the other devs on your team feel the same way. After suffering through the pain of testing manually, ask yourself: "Why do devs at other companies not have to go through ...


7

The state of project is not really relevant here. The points you need to consider here are: Are you satisfied with the work and compensation here? Do you see value in the work you do? Is you work/effort valued? Did you try to talk / discuss the scenario/ situation you're currently in with higher-ups and received no positive sign? If the answers of first ...


7

Sounds to me like they're looking for someone with knowledge of full-stack development, even thought they may not realize it. In fact, they may not even fully understand what it is they'll be asking of you (full stack development can be very demanding if you're expected to understand the skill-sets for database admin, site hosting, back-end development, as ...


7

Quick answer is keep calm and carry on. It's your first job, so only these things count: Is it ok for your physical & mental health? Are you learning valuable skills? Are you earning ok? Other things, like how the company is doing, whether it's going to survive long-term etc. is not your problem. You will most likely move to a new job in 2-3 years, ...


6

Before going any further, I suggest that the three of you talk about your expectations for how much time (per week or per month) each of you will put into this project. If you can't come to an agreement on this, there's not much point in going further. Next figure out what work needs to be done. Divide the work into small tasks, and come up with a time ...


6

Two things you said in your question: the guy who wrote the problematic code is my opponent for the promotion You view your co-workers as opponents? Does he view you as an opponent? Do you honestly believe that they only have budget to promote one of you? And this: A big con I see about revealing this beforehand is that damage prevented is not as ...


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