81

I could tell you "yes/no this is/n't reasonable", but who says I'm not either a slow developer myself or of the same opinion as your manager? These things are very subjective and hard to label objectively. However, there are concrete limits you're up against. Working hours, for one. Is your overtime being paid? Because if it isn't, yet it is (...


25

The most important thing for you to do is to start adjusting your timelines, and padding your estimates. It sounds to me as if you are giving "sunny day estimates", as we used to call them. Your estimates are assuming everything is going to to plan and without distraction, when it is plain to see just by the description you have given us, that you ...


17

Congratulations, you've encountered the project management triangle, often summarised as "good, fast, cheap: choose two" for very good reasons. You're working for a consultancy, also known as a body shop because they sell the time (bodies) of developers like you to clients. The two points of the triangle that a consultancy implicitly chooses are ...


14

I've frequently experienced this, where tasks are assigned by an offhand comment in an unrelated meeting, or a manager or team lead just walking by and saying, "Hey Meg, do when you have the bandwidth." This even happens when working on a team where issue tracking software (Jira/redmine/boards) is used for the majority of work. After several ...


12

This goes beyond 'Red-Flag'. This is, 100%, a terrible flea-bag company Why do I say that? What sort of half-baked company would even think about using interview test material to present to a prospective client?! Imagine trying to apply that logic anywhere else in your life: "I need to send a good resume to this potential employer. I know I've ...


11

This is quite common, however if you're having trouble understanding, you could either ask the person assigning the task to you to send it to you in an email, especially if it's complex. (A friendly, "Could you put all that in an email just so I can keep track of it?" or something) Always have a pen and notepad to hand and write it down as they ...


7

Your last comment was the last thing needed to trigger my Red Flag alert. We can't answer the legal/license part on this site, but to my personal taste, this smells fishy; they are asking for many things, and even disclosed to you that this is going to be presented with a client... I'd strongly suggest you consider if you are willing to give them full ...


7

That's one of the reasons I'm leaving my current company. But let's come to you, from the client where I am, I've often been put in a project after meetings to decide features and development time, so many times I'd get an email with "Hey, you have to do this thing by June 10th" (usually followed by "WT* is this?") and I also have other ...


6

To answer whether you're slow or overloaded, talk to your team mates. See if they agree with your estimates and whether they also need to do unpaid overtime to meet their timelines. If you all agree that a task should take a week but the boss wants it done in 3 days, he's not going to fire you for taking a week because any replacement would take at least a ...


5

An "extension" to your contract can and should be considered as though it were a whole new contract. You've now got a(nother) year's experience, so you are literally more valuable than when you started; if they needed to replace you they'd have to bring that person up to speed, which would be a cost to them; and you are being asked to consider a ...


5

They said I have made very good progress and at this rate I will be in a fairly senior position in a couple of years' time. I think it would be best to wait till you receive the new contract agreement document and see if the company management has taken your good progress into consideration and made a pay revision in the new contract. If yes, and it aligns ...


3

In your current line of work, any sensible future employer will look at your experience much more closely than your qualifications. These days, even job descriptions / HR filters that still say "must have a degree in Computer Science or a related subject" usually add "...or equivalent experience". That's not universally true, but it's ...


2

Because we're such a small company, we have to: Take whatever work we can get, and Be as cheap as possible The way we stay cheap is to basically compress development into as short a timespan as possible. So your company was able to have the trifecta of effinency (quality, managment or whatever it's called)? People, time and money OR Fast, cheap and good (...


2

You could be both at the same time. For your speed of work (which not only depends on your performance/skills/motivation but also type of tasks and quality of preparation) you have too many tasks. All you can do is to assume it's overload and improve the situation (rejecting, more efficient processing, give feedback to reduce redo, etc). The question if you ...


2

At the majority of jobs I've had, it was pretty common for people to give me tasks verbally at least some of the time. Nowadays, whenever someone starts giving me a task verbally, I interrupt them to let them know that I need to write down what they're saying or else I'll forget it. Then I write the task down as they describe it, and if they're speaking more ...


2

Ask your boss to prioritize items, so that you can drop less-necessary items when you run out of time. While nobody else has mentioned this, "just do as much as you can" is an important part of the Agile process. Basically, when a project starts running into time and cost constraints, there are two possible solutions: the first is to increase the ...


1

In most circumstances, having a degree is likely to make you more employable. It's something concrete that shows you have experience and are capable of doing work. Equally, job experience and a passion for the subject is another way to show this. Having a degree isn't strictly necessary, although it depends on how you want to progress your career. If you ...


1

Welcome to software development! Every single developer has this same experience. Your only problems are estimation and work/life balance, not "slowness". That you are slow is just what your project manager wants you to believe. Focus on accurate estimation, not "being faster". That way, if your estimate does not line up with the ...


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