704

You are already a real developer. I'm guessing that your boss is belittling you in order to keep your morale down, so that you're less likely to look for another job or ask for a better salary. Five years of experience is more than enough to consider yourself a qualified developer. Given that your current role is not going well, and you have an emotionally ...


472

Is this type of requirement common? No it isn't. It's also a security issue and a sign of a problematic client. Unless you're desperate for the work I'd just refuse. The major advantage of freelancing is that you pick your clients, your times and your conditions (these should always be clearly defined and agreed at the outset). If you allow a client to ...


464

Why didn't they say you didn't have enough experience earlier in the process? Because it isn't true. You had enough experience going in, but you didn't get the job. Now they need to give you a reason why they chose the successful candidate and not you, and that candidate has more experience than you. So now, compared to the successful candidate, you don't ...


351

Yes it is reasonable to leave without finding a replacement. The fact that the company has not properly planned for the case of an employee leaving for whatever reason is not your concern. Also, somebody at the company hired you so they certainly can hire your replacement. Especially if you give notice, if the company will not start to search for a ...


345

Act out of professionalism, not out of spite. That said, you can act professionally without making it easy for them. You need to get your resume out, NOW Start scheduling interviews ASAP, take time off if you need to, with or without compensation for those interviews DO THE MINIMUM REQUIRED It's not personal for them, it shouldn't be for you. They are ...


310

It need not have a significant impact. Many programmers work with medical issues ranging from quadriplegia, to blindness, to carpal tunnel syndrome. Some programmers have long and productive careers without ever learning to touch type. I personally have found that being able to touch-type reasonably quickly does help my productivity, but after working for 35 ...


304

So here's the part that seems sketchy to me: You've asked your employee, John, to do unpaid overtime work on the weekend. The reason it's "work" is because learning Angular is not something John would like to do in his free time, hence why he hasn't done it already (and continues to not do it), and it provides no value to John personally except inasmuch as ...


302

Unless the job duties specifically require it then hiring someone because they are black, white, green, male, female, etc is discrimination against the other candidates who weren't your preferred flavor of human. As this is united-states, both options 1 & 3 would be illegal so I wouldn't recommend either of those. Your best option is to aim to increase ...


237

After graduating I had about 15 interviews at different companies. I was prepared for all of them: I knew the way, I knew what message I wanted to convey. I still ended up getting lost awfully while going to one interview. It was a short, easy way, so I've no idea how this could have happened. I called them to excuse the delay telling them I would be there ...


228

Provide the candidate with a genuine programming test in the interview - a laptop hooked up to a projector with a broken project, with a mixture of basic to complex bugs, and ask them to add some functionality, again ranging from basic to moderately complex. This is something nobody can really study for and will actually provide a showcase of their skills. ...


226

No, you should not. A bonus is for past work. You've done that work, and you've earned the bonus. And think of it this way, would you have felt guilty if you left six months after getting a bonus? Three months? A month? Two weeks? A week? Would there ever be a day you felt guilty if you resigned that day, but not if you resigned the day after?


220

Right now, you're being used, and the CEO is feeding you vague promises to convince you to let yourself keep being used. Demand appropriate guarantees. If you can't get them, walk. If you had significant equity in the company, this would be fine, and even normal, but you don't, so it's not. Sure, the CEO might decide to up your pay once VC funding comes ...


204

The negative view is that they want you to be so addicted to creating things, that you work 80 hours a week for them without regard to your health and well-being. A positive view is that they want to see code samples and don’t know how to just ask for some Employers want to see passion and drive. Some companies call those things leadership qualities. ...


204

Please note that this answer is based on the original post and comments, which described a completely different context than after the edits. The original question was mainly based on a misunderstanding by the OP. Someone has to say it.. Do not join the new company! You didn't even start and they are already blackmailing you! It's completely unreasonable ...


203

Did she basically tell me to look for another company? If this is your main and only question, I will just answer that instead of telling you what you should do. It is impossible to tell with complete confidence what she meant when she told you what she told you. However, I would interpret more as: "Stop complaining, focus on your work by looking at ...


202

I have actually done this. At one point I wrote some code at work, and I realized that it would be generally useful, well beyond the scope of the specific project I was working on. So I asked my boss (who was also the CEO; it was a very small company) if it was OK to publish this as open source, and he said sure, that would be fine. Note: that last bit is ...


197

As in intern, you should follow the advice of your direct Manager. It doesn't hurt to clarify the situation. Their answer is likely to lead you to dress to the prevailing norms or better. Meaning, while jeans and a t-shirt are common, you stick with jeans and a polo. You don't want to be over dressed, despite the technical rules. That gives the ...


184

In terms of how to prep for interviews, the best thing to do is to research these topics yourself, and work on personal projects that use them. For example, my first software job was similar, we didn't engage in any good practices and they were hard to implement. So I worked on private projects, where I could do what I want and had the time. In those ...


165

Question: How to properly justify a team increase given that we don't have an output issue? (we are delivering in an acceptable manner already) Stop working overtime and see if your team can still deliver in an acceptable manner. By working overtime, you are simply adding hours of work to each member of the team, which is not much different than those ...


158

My opinion is that is a predatory practice and it is unethical. And it's the case that any decent moral or ethical system worth its salt is occasionally going to demand that you take a hit. It's easy for me to be an armchair quarterback and say, "Stand up for what's right and take the consequences." Still, that's what my advice is. I did this once. I ...


155

If it is your personal property then you have every right to ask him to return it. Ask now to give him time to sort his own replacement or you might consider selling it to him.


153

From one of your comments: i want to work what i like to work and not what they want me to work You need to go and start your own company then. If you're working for somebody else, you're at work to do what your employer wants you to do, not to do what you want to do.


151

Unfortunately maintenance is the rule when working in IT, very rarely are there new projects, and people get reassigned around projects regularly. And while the quality of the code you will have to maintain in your professional life will vary widely, they will never smell the same as a fresh 2-6 month old project. However, there are things you can do to ...


147

It's worth looking at this from the other perspective, namely, that of the team lead: You have two different structures, one is tested a proven, presumably with an existing number of people supporting similar-structured applications. The second has been brought to you, with technical reasoning, but, crucially, without business reasoning. Rather than not ...


143

It's clear that your "Option 3", lying about the results of interviews to favor minority candidates, isn't the appropriate solution. So how do you ensure that you'll be able to go with "Option 2" more of the time? Reassess the criteria you're using to judge "success" in an interview. If you're judging your candidates purely on conventional criteria such as ...


143

Ask if you can be reassigned to another project. I already had some question in interview such as "would it be ethically ok for you to work for a military project?". Some companies do care about this kind of things, and could therefore reassign you to another project. After all, it's in their interest to make sure you are happy and motivated with your ...


143

How to gracefully leave a company you helped start? Speak with the other partners in an open and honest manner. Explain as you have here, and provide a reasonable notice -- say 30 days in this case before departing. This is plenty of time to hire up, knowledge transfer, etc. Also, if you desire, offer up a per hour consultant role, where you could be ...


140

once you actually get the job, you'll most likely never run into any of those problems from the job interview book again If their job doesn't involve solving those kinds of problems, why test them on them in the first place? Why not give them a real problem they would encounter on the job instead? That's my recommendation. Surely you will have many ...


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