New answers tagged

0

Try to express before such a question comes up that you would like to move from a risky situation to a company that has more effective practices.


0

If you have other work experience, use that. You don't follow any of your preferred best practices at your current job, but what did you do in your previous job? How did you write software when getting your degree? What do you do when writing software in your spare time? As an interviewer, I am simply happy to hear a story about the person's general work ...


2

How do you make sure to stay on top regardless of your age? As a software engineer, your best bet to remain relevant and marketable is to make sure your are proficient in relevant technologies. Being able to produce is what really matters, as the other answer point's out, but being relevant is also key. In our field, you also have to keep an eye on what ...


13

Age doesn't matter. Experience does however, and a young age implies inexperience. You've been working, total, for less than a year. That's nothing in the grand scheme of things, and, without wishing to be too blunt, they're correct when they say you likely don't have enough experience. Chances are you'll look back in, say, 5 or 10 years time, and realise ...


17

I've been in this situation recently. At my previous gig, we worked on a very old code base (some java 1.2/1.3 compliant code); code was full of magic numbers and magic strings used to access Object references from Vector's which were then cast; no unit tests, barely any integration testing, none of it automated; little to no time allocated to refactoring ...


3

Make it a "why do I believe that the company i am interviewing with is great and better than my current workplace" answer. Whenever I'm interviewing somewhere else, I'm usually asked about how I work and how I go about testing or verification/validation. Instead of "how I go" answer "how I intend to go". State that obviously producing reasonable quality ...


36

In terms of how to prep for interviews, the best thing to do is to research these topics yourself, and work on personal projects that use them. For example, my first software job was similar, we didn't engage in any good practices and they were hard to implement. So I worked on private projects, where I could do what I want and had the time. In those ...


1

I'm going to give you an answer for one specific facet of your question: that they can't replace you. Nope. You're not irreplaceable. It simply doesn't work like that, no matter what you might think. I know this, because I was that replacement once. I was hired to be the "Corporate Apps" person at a company. 'The' is the right word there - I was being ...


2

It's interesting that among all those answers from the manager, there was nothing like "If you stay here, we'll give you a promotion or at least a raise of ". That tells you right away how much they do (or don't) value you. If you're not worth a measly 10% (or whatever other amount that's not insignificant) raise to them, then why do you worry so much about ...


0

An old saying where I live says something like 'everybody is useful but nobody is indispensable': they will replace you. Also, this does not need to be a negotiation, there is no need to explain or expand on any issue, reason, whatever. Be kind but firm and just hand them your notice, fulfill it to the letter working hard or even harder and that's it. ...


1

They are trying to sell you on the benefits of a startup, which are valid - being lead person when there’s growth does mean a chance at a lot more opportunity than you’ll have at a “desk job”. But there are downsides too, and you are wanting something more traditional where you can learn more from others, that’s fair. I had a friend recently leave a just-...


1

Let's break this down a bit, to the points your manager made: Our company will grow a lot, we're aiming to do stuff which other companies are doing not so good! Almost all companies aim to grow. Your manager has no idea what other companies are aiming to be doing in a year, or how well they'll be doing them, so this is unsubstantiated. In my opinion ...


17

You don't owe them anything after the end of your employment, and it's not your responsibility to teach them that. Hand in your resignation, work professionally during your notice period, and then move on to the next opportunity. You're leaving a job, it's perfectly fine to do that, and you'll do it many more times during your career.


7

They are playing the guilt card pure and simple. They are not always to be believed, you only have to read several other posts on here that say “I was promised X... and it never happened” The CEO gives the excuse well the market did not pan out... So, you need to focus on your aspirations and reasons and make the move best for you. Ignore the guilt card...


1

These kind of requirements can arise out of several possible sources. They are filling the position based on a subsidy or similar funding arrangement. Globally this kind of thing comes up in different forms, ranging from direct "Government paying companies to hire newbies so said newbies can gain useful experience faster", to tax breaks or other schemes. ...


1

I think this is from hiring staff copy and pasting existing job postings and then editing them. Even if it doesn't mention internship anywhere in the posting it probably is for an internship type position they just re-used from a normal full time salaried position posting.


2

Just tell the recruiter what you just described to us here. The reasons you stated for moving from A to B and the reasons for being interesting leaving company B sound perfectly reasonable. People move around in the tech industry. Don't make something up that's sure to confuse matters for you further down the interviewing process with Google.


6

As the old saying goes, fool me once shame on you, fool me twice... I do know India has horrible employment laws and you need to be "relieved" by your current employer before going elsewhere. As such, I would go ask a lawyer.


8

Just be honest about it. You can say your current job at company B was an excellent opportunity, as it offered you the opportunity to live abroad. You can also say that you're considering Google (despite the great parts of the job at B, including the international exposure), because it's your dream company (or a company you really admire) and you wouldn't ...


1

IMHO, Your only option is to get both letters in person, say to both you want to think about it and come home to think it over There may be subjective promises and "explanations" of particular offer details and options, but i wouldn`t rely on anything that is not in the letter itself


6

Both the companies deny sharing offer letter over email. They are asking me to be at their office to get offer letter. It's a commonly followed practise among mid-sized IT companies in India. It's apparent that neither of the companies want you to shop around using their offer letter for a better pay. In such cases, the candidate is typically handed the ...


2

Both the companies deny sharing offer letter over email. They are asking me to be at their office to get offer letter. Is there any catch? Is there any ways or techniques to ask them to share offer letter over mail? They've refused to send the offer letter by email. Is there a catch? Yes, they want to present you the offer letter in person, as they'...


1

As the other answers have stated, you don't have to. If you want to, however, it shouldn't be a problem to do so. I am, however, a bit confused by your use of the word "confront". If it were me, I would definitely want to have a hand-off meeting with him, in which you go over all of the sorts of things you found before, and I'd start off the meeting ...


2

You don't need to apologize. Mangers move people around between tasks and projects all the time depending on priorities, skills, schedules and other things they need to consider. It's part of the job. You expressed your scheduling concerns to your manager and he resolved the issue in the best way he could. This is not uncommon. It would be no different than ...


14

My problem is that I feel guilty pawning this project onto a colleague. I don't want bad blood between us. Should I confront him an apologize? I don't see any compelling reason for you to have to apologize (for what?) with this coworker. You already delayed an important family event to attend the first time, and managed to postpone it to another date. A ...


0

However, I've recently had an incident where something offensive made its way into code documentation ... I've been going through his past code and any code he submits: things like this pop up very rarely, but I've found a couple others from past code If your company use git for version control, you can set up some git hooks to: prevent him ...


3

Startups in particular need the ability to pivot rapidly, and tend to work on very tight budgets, so can't guarantee you'll get training in anything specific or at any specific time. To be successful in a startup you need to be able to pick up technologies on your own initiative, and regularly get out of your comfort zone. "Since there was lot of work ...


0

As someone with a child on the autistic spectrum, I have some experience with the subject. And I think I can recognise an autistic spectrum disorder, or autistic traits, in people. My personal belief (so it's not supported by any kind of evidence) is that while an autistic spectrum disorder can be an explanation for certain behaviour, it cannot be an excuse ...


1

So the team lead in the USA (who apparently calls the shots) didn't like your work. What didn't he like? Do you see a way of improving yourself, based on his feedback? It's not easy to deal with negative feedback. It's something you need to learn when working in a team, and your company's goals don't always align very well with your own, personal goals. ...


9

Both sides made mistakes, but it won't help you that your employer made mistakes. Often small or young companies are not good at training new hires. You should have learned during your free time in the office. You joined in January and you are stating yourself that you didn't have much to do, then why didn't you start looking at documentation and ...


0

She gave you the freedom to interpret it as you wish. So is it. If she had wanted to fire you, she had communicated that. If she formulates unclear, that means that she does not want to communicate what she did not. They are the experts (in theory) of the personal matters and not you. Of course you have all the reasons to start to check your alternatives, ...


3

more technical phone call with a software engineer to dig deeper into my experience on CV - this will be technically oriented So my question is - how should I prepare for the technical phone call with an engineer? Since they will be digging into your experience as represented on your CV read your CV over very carefully make sure you know of ...


1

No actually it's more complex than that. She clearly told you that you might resign or possibly get fired as well! The both sides need to make it work that you mention plus the metaphor of the relationship is the important part. It sends a clear message that the bullet points work both ways. Now combining this with your bullet points we can translate as ...


1

Once you crossed that line of being verbally there's no going back. It's hard to defend oneself on the topic after that. In any case, I simply point out the wrong things people do, for the most part. Often, my own people would belittle me, sometimes at the most inappropriate times, as when it's just been shown or come to light as to otherwise. Mostly base ...


1

I'm now happily employed and wondering if I should clean these out, or leave them so my 'contribution history' shows the time I've spent learning? I don't see any reason why you should delete them. They contain code and code snippets that you've made and that someday may prove useful to reference or reuse. Also, given you are already hired, I don't see how ...


-2

So far it sounds like you believe he is a racist autistic person. You had several people make complaints and you defended him by saying he didn't meant it and probably brought up he is autistic. I would cease this immediately. This opens the door to a major lawsuit: you isolate him, tell people he's autistic, and that management is thinking about firing him....


-1

I would approach it like the risk management situation it is. An employee, regardless of mental handi-capable status, can still put the company in financial risk should she make a statement that winds up in court and is interpreted as 'Hate Speech'. Treat the situation like any other like situation ...even if it risks losing a very productive worker...all ...


2

Talk to a psychologist. A psychologist, someone who studies and understands autism and similar traits a lot better than you (and we here at workplace) do, can help you understand this person better. It is perfectly normal to go to a psychologist to better understand a particular individual and how to deal with them (and in many cases how to reduce the ...


7

It depends on what the purpose of your GitHub account is, but since you posted here, I'm assuming your intention is use the GitHub account as a showcase for your skills. In that case, you would do well to whittle it down to the projects you are actually proud of and want to show off. No potential employer is going to sift through 88 different repos to find ...


0

I think you should remove your older repositories (could be done by making them private), simply to help people find the interesting projects easier. There is a high probability that someone is randomly looking at projects and misjudging you just by chance. So just clone all old repositories, zip everything and store it somewhere.


14

You are discriminating against your employee because you think he is autistic (you don't mention that he has been diagnosed with any documented disability, so this just your armchair diagnosis to begin with). As an autist and a manager myself, you have to treat your autistic employee the same as your neurotypical employees. Instead, you appear to be giving ...


-7

I've found a couple others [insults] from past code (nothing since the incident, when I talked to him). You had a problem and already fixed it. For the meantime, you don't have to do anything.


4

In the following I assume that you want to help him to improve. Say this explicitly in terms like "Your code is fine but there are things that are unacceptable to others that we need to do something about together as your work is important to us." Peer review all his deliveries. Modern version control tools make this easy. Make it absolutely clear ...


5

This depends on what your exact goal is. Because from this situation arise several goals, some of which conflict or interact with each other. Do you want to minimize rocking the boat and resolve this as quickly and quietly as possible to help the engineer in question not make similar missteps in the future and educate him about not sabotaging himself ...


115

If you're dealing with someone that has problems with social interaction and social cues, one thing to do is ask yourself: Do they comply with instructions? The reason I ask that is because... well, some people are just jerks. It's not that they can't understand interpersonal aspects - they simply don't care. However, from the sounds of it, your coworker ...


-3

The best solution is don't change anything. the solution has historically been to try to isolate him from people he is likely to offend, and just let him keep doing his own thing He's producing high quality work. He isn't causing problems to the company (as long as you keep him apart from those he has an issue with) and you said he doesn't put anything ...


-1

Be upfront. I recently broke my femur (do not do this -- it isn't fun) and I have physical therapy twice a week and I've had issues being late a few times because recovering from a broken femur just plain sucks. That said, being a "night owl" may not be the best medical condition to bring to HR. Having been a "night owl" I can tell you it can be fixed. And ...


3

To be clear here, @PagMax has already provided a perfect answer to the main question - whether you are 'subtly being told to resign' or not. The answer is - you're being told to either accept the company's practices or resign. Which is a subtle way of saying that your demands are not going to be met by the company. Do not change your current course of ...


9

You should talk with your manager about your concern. Your manager wants to see you be successful in your role and understands the requirements of your job very well. It's better to have addressed late arrivals with your manager proactively than to have him/her confront you later. He/she will help you find ways to ensure occasionally arriving late isn't a ...


0

It may be worth considering using the services of an intermediary service to handle the reporting of timesheets and also the payment. I have previously used a site called Upwork (it used to be called "Elance"), and while there are fees attached I found the reporting of hours to be very easy, and the client would automatically pay and there was a dispute ...


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