New answers tagged

0

If the interviewer believed that coming to a talk with a CEO in shorts would lessen your chances to get the job, and he wanted you to get the job, then obviously it is of course absolutely appropriate to tell you to dress in a way that increases your chances. If the CEO judges you by what you are wearing for a conversation with the CEO, and doesn't give ...


7

You should NEVER go to an interview in shorts. Period. Job interviews are extremely formal, so shorts are taboo even in less-serious places like Texas and Wyoming. You might get away with jeans during the summer in southern states, but that is the absolute limit of informality. The lead developer was trying to do you a favor. Seriously, first impressions ...


14

considering I was not clued in regarding what dress code I should expect or told that I would be meeting in such a formal setting ? Job interviews are formal settings. Second to meetings with board members or backers or particularly corporate customers, they are perhaps the most formal settings a developer will find themselves in. There are companies and ...


11

First impressions count as does office politics Every company has politics and the lead has to play to the politics of his company. As a result, he is probably behaving conservatively to make sure that all goes well. Indulge him this little favour. I personally would love a workplace that so clearly spelled out strategic expectations rather than having a ...


19

The company may have a casual dress code, but that's for regular employees, not for people coming to an interview. You can pretty much assume that for any interview for a 100K+ job, your attire should be suit/shirt/tie, except if in the invitation for the interview they explicitly tell you otherwise. Assume suit and tie by default. The interviewers can ...


71

He also said he'd like me to meet the CEO, but that he doesn't think my present attire would "leave the best impression" (I was wearing cargo shorts with a belt, and a dress shirt tucked in). He mentioned that he doesn't personally have a problem with my attire but that the CEO might. I walked away feeling conflicted. On the one hand, they made ...


1

I don't believe it has an general definition, so you'll have to interpret the phrase literally. The recruiter will have been given a job spec, then translated it into vague language to stop people finding the employer. The software is designed to build workflows - perhaps they are talking about a CMS which lets you setup workflows such as edit, review, ...


1

I can give you an answer based on close experience - not my own personal experience, but that of employing two junior developers who were in your exact position with their previous roles. One of them was already a long-term friend, the other has since become a close friend too. I can tell you that, in both cases, they found the experience quite damaging to ...


1

Specifically, what are the risks and opportunities of being (at least for two months) the only developer on a project as a junior? It sounds like what you're really worried about is if you'll be stuck doing tasks you can't do or you can do the tasks but overburdened. Chances are the management knows the team isn't 100%. They may come to you and ask you what ...


5

Pros: You will get lots of hands-on experience You might be able to shape the code the way you want You might get lots of visibility Cons: It might be very stressful in case you can't handle some stuff in a timely manner Since it is your first job, not having people to learn from is a big con, IMO I'd make sure that your boss/lead is well aware of your ...


2

If you think comparable roles to your current responsibility are currently paid ~2x, I would go with at least 2x, maybe even 2.5x. Or hey, if they desperately need you, and want to make sure you stay, then ask for a vesting equity package. If the CTO says yes, awesome. If he says that they can't pay that much, then say you're open to other non-monetary ...


3

With six years of work experience already, that recent company can easily be explained away (or even left off your resume entirely if the period was very short). Your company was restructured and your department went through a spin-off and a complete change in mission and technology. Part of this can easily be verified if they just call your employer. ...


2

Sorry to hear that - it's never nice to be "duped" into a role that you weren't expecting, and don't want. My manager is saying they will eventually update to MEAN stack but sometime later which I highly doubt. "Eventually" means "maybe, if we have to, in a decade or so, if we're all still around then". For all intents and purposes, it probably means "...


10

Now this has become like a startup environment, In which you work on solving multidisciplinary problems. It would be good opportunity for you to learn. You find the problem and solve it, or if they assign you the project then first map the depth of it and accept it as a challenge. With this approach the experience you will gain is extraordinary withing ...


1

In short, yes. Your boss asked you what you need, to be happy in your position. Now your question is Do I have much to lose naming a 2x number? which the company is unlikely to be able to pay you. So you just told your boss that you're not happy in your position, and that it's not possible for him/her to make you happy in your position. The only ...


0

"I do have a number in mind but I hesitated to answer before because I know the company is already having difficulties and my number is 1.75-2x my current salary. I like the work, and I like working with you. If this number seems impossible, what would you think about a consulting arrangement? It would let me keep working for you and also help me get a ...


6

I do have a number that would make me happy, but that number is about 1.75-2x what I'm currently making (I believe I'm underpaid for my current responsibility).... Besides the money, I enjoy the work and my boss quite a bit, though also feel like I should get experience with different companies and industries (where I think consulting might be useful). ...


4

I ask this question a lot lately. Because I want to see where everyone wants to be and will then try to figure out a way on how to get them there. I don't want my team to be looking elsewhere for things we're likely to provide and I want to be honest with them on where they can get inside the company, given the current situation. So if they can't get what ...


13

Do I have much to lose naming a 2x number? Rather than worrying about whether the boss may be offended by your number I would worry about whether the company can ever pay you what you are worth. You already believe that you are underpaid and you mentioned that due to company performance there will be no raise this review period. What happens if the ...


50

Although there may legitimately be things about your question that make it seem unique compared to other "how do I determine my salary" or "how should I ask for a raise" questions on here, the good news is, the answer is essentially always the same: Salary should be based on the value you bring to the company. It shouldn't really matter what you made last ...


13

There are lot of things that can soften the blow of naming a high number, but what does that matter? It would be all hypothetical and next year could come and go with no raises as well along with the year after that. In the end it will not matter what number you mentioned and if the CTO agreed or not. IMO, you have to do what you can now to take ...


5

First of all, you got an opportunity to quote a number, not everyone gets that. Also, just because you are asked to provide a number, it's not guaranteed you'll get that - there might be further negotiations. TL;DR: Ask whatever you believe you're worth of, now. If your boss knows your qualities and accomplishments, and appreciates that, even after the ...


0

Part of technical leadership, or really any leadership, is the politicking that goes along with it. It helps to have a higher level understanding of what's going on. You need buy in. You can tell them they're wrong, you can explain why they're wrong, but unless they agree they're wrong it doesn't matter. In their reality, you are interfering. In their ...


0

Is there any way I can let HR at B know about this while I accept the offer? It's a little bit of a tough spot: I have no prior internship experience and hiring me would surely be a risk. I also don't want my reputation, or that of my school, to be damaged. Is it better to take the gamble that I will find a better internship opportunity, and drop ...


2

How to accept internship offer but keep the ability to renege? and I will be scheduling a site tour next month that will be very exciting. They are not going to allow this. Were you talking a few days, then perhaps. But you are talking timelines of months and months. If you renege several months from now, they would need to restart the process from ...


1

What I would do: Call Company A and ask them how long the hiring process will take and if they can speed it up, since you already have another offer. Ask Company B how long they can wait for your final decision. Ideally, you will have a time slot where you have offers from both on the table. If this does not work out, you have to decide. You can surely ...


3

Which option is no option: Based on possible outcomes, just staying should not be your first choice, unless for personal reasons. This is because in any case, you need to talk to your new employer first. Either they are sympathetic to your situation, then you can think about working something out. Or they are not, in which case you know for sure. But this ...


2

If I were you, I'd relocate, start working, visit over weekends as possible. Life is usually the best when it's balanced - don't forget your past, but don't kill your future before it even started, either.


4

Speaking as a manager of software engineers, I have to say that when we hire someone, we aren't hiring them because we expect huge productivity in their first month (or first few months) of employment. We are hiring for the long term. We do eventually expect productivity, but we know we have complex environments with a lot to learn. We want someone who's ...


9

Talk to your employer, and see what's possible! Normally I would advise against soliciting private information to your new employer, but in this case, it should not harm to discuss possibilities with them. As I see it, you can not really lose anything here. Worst case, they can't do anything to help you. You can still decide if you want to stay and let ...


3

How to go about letting my upcoming employee know about the whole situation Talk to your employer and explain your situation as best as you can. Let them know the the different errands and new responsibilities you expect to have with your family and ask them how they can accommodate for your new situation. Based on their feedback, you can then determine ...


6

Nobody can say for sure, but this is a feeling that many people have. One little tip that is important: If you learn something from person X make sure you remember it or write it down. I have often worked in companies where some employees(including younger me) would use 1 or 2 senior developers as personal Google and ask them things that were explained to ...


16

Do I have to persevere, until I get to understand things better Yes. I have been developing software, as a freelancer for *cough* decades, and there is a point in every project, usually after 3 or 4 weeks, where I feel hopeless & think that I will never learn it. This passes every time, and knowing that helps me prevent depression/hopelessness. It's ...


32

My manager seems to think it will take time for me to deal with everything, and it's okay for him to explain me everything I need, and that I'm not really productive right now. You seem to be in good company and management, most of the folks complains about just the opposite. You manager understands your situation and extending the help they can to bring ...


0

It is probably just a bad fit for you Some people are very focused on feedback and feel lost without it. Others prefer to be in a company where they can just do their own thing. I don't think those personalities can work together for long. There are also those who closely follow incentives and those who don't and again, they can't work well together. Scrum ...


9

The point of software development is to develop working software that has value. "Coding to the spec" and "not willing to drag others along" are not valued attributes. Half-finished features have no value. Features blindly coded to a bad spec have no value. If you're given a spec that has problems and you're the only one who realizes that, your ...


4

The usual method is that the team assigns points to tasks, and then team members pick up whatever tasks they like. If you somehow manage to get too many points assigned to your task, I'll pick it up and look good :-) But really that's not going to happen with scrum done properly, because all the other members figure out that the points are inflated. If you ...


6

You need to earn their trust and respect as individuals (or at least the trust of one or two of the more senior members of the team). You say that you're confident that their approach to the project is flawed. That doesn't matter as far as your short term goal is concerned. Instead, try to offer your help to deal with immediate problems they're facing. ...


10

Have a talk with your own manager. Explain what you've learned about their technical problem. Explain what solution they're currently pursuing. Explain what solution you have in mind. Tell him that the impression you get is that they're not open to different solutions than they're currently pursuing. Now ask your manager how to proceed. His job as a ...


11

First of all, make sure you are approaching them in a official capacity, not just as a colleague-met-next-to-watercooler person. Couple of steps, when you are working as an adviser for a team which is not directly being managed by your superior: Ensue your manager and the manager of other team is aware of your involvement. Document everything, all ...


3

I work in the Industry for about 20 Years, in Germany. Just recently I also noticed more and more phone-interviews. So that seems to get more common nowadays. That said, If there was real interest it was always followed up by an in-person interview. So from my perspective, deciding on an phone interview sounds unusual. This may vary with the kind of job ...


5

From the company's point of view, you told them you would be absent for 4 weeks, and them come back for a while before you leave for good. You say you are the most junior member of the team. That means that in reality, if you were going to stay for two or three years, it would be worth the cost of training you for maybe the first year in the hope that the ...


1

You could talk to your manager and ask why the change in the atmosphere at work. However, I am wondering about how you got in this situation in the first place. I suspect the answer might be "You are leaving soon". If that is the case, there might not be much you can do, other than bring forward your plan to leave. I have also been asked by my manager ...


0

Stonewalling may not be a good answer because you create a paper trail showing you are not cooperating that your colleague can take to your boss and damage your standing. Another reason is that both of you were hired to generate value to your boss. It is this value that pays your bills. If your colleague fails, that failure may hurt the profitability of the ...


0

It is really pretty simple: Treat others how you want to be treated. Similarly: your response is your responsibility. You are trying to justify you being a jerk because you perceived his actions as anti-social. That does not work. Help him, help him more then others. Praise his accomplishments in front of others. If your organization harms you ...


1

The unfortunate truth is that (at least here in America) colleagues/managers tend to talk to/befriend you mostly because they need something from you (usually they need you in their role). Once that need goes away, often the relationship does as well. I've seen this multiple times even when people simply switch roles within the same team. They make new '...


8

This is perfectly normal Most companies want to cast a wide net without incurring large expenses. You cannot do that with in-person interviews as that either limits the available people to those within driving distance or requires the company to spend a lot of money on airline tickets and hotels. For most of my jobs, the interviews have been 100% remote ...


2

To answer your question: Maybe you are not actually working and slacking around most of the time. Or maybe you are working but you think that your project ist unimportant and so your work is insignificant. To answer what I think is really your question: How can you get your manager to assing you to the bigger projects / give you some more interesting work. ...


8

While it’s understood to not be as deep or long-term as a marriage, your job is still a collection of relationships. So try this situation out on other relationships. If your new husband (congratulations!) left for a few weeks and told you that he was planning on divorcing you in eight months, how would that impact your interaction with him? Yes, the ...


78

I'm honestly surprised that you're surprised by this. You essentially already have one foot out of the door - and have just given the team a month to get used to working without you. It might seem wasteful not to fully utilise a resource that's going to be there for another 7-8 months, and truth be told it is in my opinion. But that is easier said than done ...


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