New answers tagged

0

Forget all the other answers, they are already one step too far. Your employer won't let you do it In Germany a common employee contract includes a clause saying that you must request approval for any side business. Normally your employer must approve this if he likes it or not, but in this case you want to work for a competitor and especially one with ...


0

This will probably depend a lot on culture and customs in the locality you are applying in. As far as I know, in Germany, listing the languages you speak (if possible, with some way to determine the approximate level of proficiency) is a standard part of the CV. Typically, job postings will only list the most crucial requirements of a job, often (if at all) ...


2

How much do recruiters/hiring managers look for something like foreign language proficiency? Obviously, it depends. It depends on the specific foreign language, the company, the customers, the workforce, the personal preferences of the interviewers, etc. In general, if proficiency in a foreign language were required, it would be specifically mentioned in ...


0

The guy is looking for cheap labor. You will be offered such absurd deals 10 times a year throughout your career as a programmer. When experienced programmers are offered such absurd deals - they just laugh and ignore it.


2

I don't believe that he doesn't know any senior people in your company. I think he knows that they would require more money from him than he's willing or able to pay so he went to you. I also don't believe that he has any intention of making you CTO in the future as he claims. That would be highly unusual. If you said you had a business degree I might buy ...


5

This coworker is going to start his own company with a similar business model that the company where I work has. That could be a legally risky move right there. Did y'all sign an NDA with your current employer? If so then y'all could be opening yourselves up to a big lawsuit. Also, your company may have patents on their business processes. I know that a ...


1

I know that a lot of university graduates start their own companies when they have good ideas, but in my case I'm not a CS graduate + only have 1 year of work experience. Is this situation normal? But you aren't starting your own company - you will be working for someone else, initially part-time, with a higher profile. Right? Or is he asking you to work ...


5

How would you think about it in five or ten years in case you had turned down that offer? Even if that startup fails there will be some upsides from having tried new things. In a big company you are normally just one cog in the machinery. In the startup, you will be exposed to all what is needed to keep it running and you will gain experience in fields that ...


1

ABC corporation is upset that I take long to fix client issues. They are just going to have to live with it. It takes as long as it takes, especially if you need to test everything thoroughly before calling it "done". How can I communicate to my manager that this is actually quite serious? Your manager doesn't consider it serious enough to do ...


2

You need to communicate the seriousness of this to your manager. Book a meeting with your manager, make it an hour long. Make sure he understands that what you want to say is important. Before the meeting, go through the code you are maintaining and make a list of all the structural and coding problems. Be specific. Make a document that contains this list, ...


1

Knowing the language gives you a head start on understanding the next product you work with that's written in that language. With this in mind, it doesn't make you an expert on the next product. You'll still have to read the product (and understand it) to become an expert on it. If your managers have difficulty understanding this, tell them that knowing (...


4

Because of this, the company has deemed me the "best X developer" (which I find funny... because all I do is literally just write the simplest possible code whilst maintaining consistency. I also have a bit of a soft spot for unit testing and documentation) and have asked me to take over a high stakes project. Keeping things as simple as they can ...


19

Unfortunately, it's a case of "Welcome to the software industry!" As a professor told me in college, "If engineers built buildings like programmers build software, civilization would collapse by Tuesday..." There are 100s of such questions on this site, along the lines... "I'm a new programmer with my first job. I'm shocked and ...


0

Say ... why not just take these concerns to your present manager? "Tell them exactly what you think," just as you have done here, "then ... listen carefully." First, speak. Then, [shaddup and ...] let them speak. And please remember – neither of you are actually "adversaries."


1

My gut instinct would be to just wait out the 5 months. HOWEVER.................. At the end of the five months You must aggressively as possible ... Seek a drastically higher pay level ... At that company or another company. THE KEY FACT IS THIS: At the end of the "internship" in five months, one of two things will happen A: They will try to ...


5

You're putting in the work, not being told to do unpaid overtime or anything else. Which is good, it shows commitment and a good work ethic. But it's not grounds for trying to get a new contract sorted. You're an intern, this is the sort of thing you do if you want to impress. Are you being taken advantage of? Yes & NO. You're taking advantage of ...


-11

Programmers are incredibly - amazingly - well paid. And they only have to work the clock on the dot: arrive at exactly 9, leave at exactly 5 (or whatever your system is) - and that's it. The idea of slacking-off midday, is nuts. Programmers who "check out social media" get sacked instantly. It's an incredibly embarrassing look... "Social media&...


3

There can be no generally excepted answers for this question. The problem is that managers and business owners are eternally way over optimistic about how much work can be done at top quality. They will always put more on your plate than can be done. This is true for nearly ANY job that involves mental work. (I have a friend who is suffering this same thing ...


0

Easy: "you've got eight hours of my day during regular business hours." Of course sometimes in this business this has to be "in the middle of the night [in some time zone or another ...]." But, nevertheless, there must be a clear delineation between work and not-at- work! Never(!) give that up. Because, "no matter how 'good' you ...


5

I don't understand why you think you'd be "holding them for ransom". You seem to be having some kind of moral quandary regarding the business relationship you have with them. You owe them nothing other than to perform the work they pay you for. If they terminate the relationship with you then delete/destroy any and all copies of their intellectual ...


2

Don't email the CEO with "your thoughts". It's too easy to ignore a difficult conversation by email. DO email the CEO with a request for a meeting to discuss the future of the project. Go and see them in person, and talk about the challenges, the communication, where they see the project going. You'll be able to read their body language, head off ...


4

but what are the general expectation of downtime as a programmer? This is anecdotal and only based on my experience but officially companies will want you to move from one piece of work to the next with no downtime. So if you are in a meeting with your manager they will likely be lining up work for you to do. In other wise there is no expectation of ...


11

The amount of "time out" during the weekday while working from home shouldn't measurably differ from what you did while in the office - that's really your benchmark. The plus side to the WFH lifestyle is that you no longer need to spend time commuting and that you're able to spread your working hours out a little. I personally start my working day ...


2

How often can you take breaks during the workday to just take a walk, or check social media and random stuff? You can take a break during regular workday, as long as it does not affect the commitments. Also, breaks while you're working from home is to be the same while you were working in an office setup - there's no reason to have a special case for either ...


2

Real time firmware debugging is a serious challenge. You have not just the issues with "does the code work" but also the issues of "does it work in the allotted time?" It takes significant imagination to read existing code and determine what types of problems could be happening with that code and associated interrupts and possible multi-...


1

No, your hypothesis is worthless. You need to actually interview people to find out. I suggest you make a demo of what your graph would look like, and go to university coding departments and ask people what they think. Tell them it's for your masters thesis. You'll likely find some people find it very useful, and others do not. Some people are visual ...


8

So I am interested to know if is it a matter/concern for developers who I will hire that if our computers are Mac or Windows machines? Yes, it is. There are technical limitations to what each machine can do. Please consult your technical staff, developers mainly, what they prefer. Their preference will be driven by their role in your company. Frontend ...


0

Are there any disadvantages I should be aware of that come with working at a startup? Government jobs often offer tax benefits not available in private jobs. You will likely have to pay more tax for your new job.


-1

I fundamentally agree with the foregoing. You're justifiably bothered by the word, "startup." I'd encourage you right now to go back to your recruiter and to simply ask them about the business role that you will be expected to play, and the business environment – from day to day to day – in which you will be expected to play it. After all – "...


-1

The main disadvantage is that at a government job, every penny you get comes from tax payers. At a startup, every penny comes from some rich person taking a big risk with their money. For this reason at a government job, you have total security. (Unless there is literally a revolution; other than that, government can take what they want from tax payers.)


4

First, the term startup is applied to companies at many different stages of growth, yet working at a two person shop is very different than working at a place with 2000 employees, though they both might legitimately be "startups". If you provide more information regarding the growth-stage of the startup, the answers you receive will be more ...


4

When prospective hires ask me that in interviews, I tend to tell them that the good parts and the bad parts are really two sides of the same coin. Because so much less has already been invented and established, you get to write the rules. Unfortunately, you're also the one who has to make sure they work! Unless the company is getting big (say over 100 ...


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