New answers tagged

2

when a misunderstanding in the business flow led to a bug in a product shared by both the X and other group companies and this was not fixed immediately, a X boss complained that "they are not sold yet" Soooo never, ever in your company no one ever made a mistake of ommiting some divisions or totaly forgetting they exist and let them knwo about some changes?...


2

more recently, a special program (let's call it Phoenix) was started. IMO Phoenix means significant restructuring (externalizing a big fraction of the shared services and some layoffs). However, this program is accompanied by a great marketing effort (a big Intranet page describing in detail the steps, list of possible companies where some products and ...


3

I've been involved - mostly indirectly - with a few companies that ran out of money and were unable to pay their workers. In no case did they give any kind of advance notice, and while I can't state it definitively I conclude that there is no duty to tell workers or anyone else (except maybe owners) about the financial state of the company. Revealing that ...


0

Here's a few practical ideas for resolving this. Try to separate code review comments into objective and subjective points. Objective points include observations such as "there is a potential bug here", or "this does not match the requirements". Subjective comments include "there's a better way to do this", or "this would be better named X". It' often ...


1

When this type of question comes up, the most important part is to reflect and be as precise as possible answering: What are you doing right now? What do you want to do? What is the time frame/resources you have available? You say: I have a Bachelor's in Computer Science [...] I'm managing the existing web app [...] not feeling like making it my ...


0

I know this doesn't answer your question, but it may help to know people can find themselves in weird work situations. I was a contractor once, very inexperienced, when contracting was possible as a junior developer, which these days isn't possible. I joined a team and found myself working on the most complex aspect of the project, even though the ...


4

Been there, messed that up. Got past it. This unfortunately is very common when high-energy "individual contributors" take on supervisory roles. When I made these mistakes, it was because. I believed I could do the work faster than I could explain it. I was sure that my solution would be better than anybody else's. The new job put a lot of pressure on me ...


2

As a c# developer I can tell you that MVC is becoming less popular and javascript/html front end that connect to Web API backend more popular, so if you learn C# I would only bother learning how to build the backend, which is a much smaller set of c# skills


3

I can't really tell you what to do, but something that's certainly relevant: When companies say they want Java/Swift/C++/Fortran/Rust/MyNewFavLang etc. experience (and the role isn't an entry level grad or similar), they're generally looking for solid, commercial experience with these languages over a few years. Being spread thin often doesn't matter too ...


5

I think you're worrying unnecessarily. If your boss had serious issues with your work, they should have told you long ago. Most likely, your boss just has a lot of other things to worry about and has no complaints. It feels like I should have more to show for 6 months of work No, even an experienced developer takes months to produce anything significant ...


3

Don't worry, you're doing fine. it always seems like it takes me longer to complete tasks than I think it should 6 month probation All of this is very common, even standard experience of a junior developer. Keep improving, focus on the task you're given, don't worry, you're doing fine.


-1

Is this a big deal, or is the company trying to determine whether or not I have basic programming skills? It should not be a big deal. Pretty much nobody writes code without simple errors in one go. But the kind of company where this is not a big deal is also the kind of company which will let you use a compiler in a test. So I suspect that it is relevant ...


2

"This timescale is designed so that I will obtain the certification just in time for the firm to retain a certain accreditation based on the number of qualified engineers" This is a lot of pressure to put on a Junior member of staff, I doubt the company accreditation would come down to solely you passing of failing a test. If it does you need to have a ...


6

To "challenge" their plan you need to understand their goal. And to do that you will have to talk to whichever one you have the best relationship with. You need to understand how they view it, and why the deadline was picked. It is possible that the timing is convenient for them, or a way to increase their odds. If they need three more people to be ...


1

That’s what your one-to-one is there for. If you think your time is being wasted, then that’s where you tell her.


4

Asking questions, and asking for explanations of things, is a legitimate management technique. It's effective at surfacing misunderstandings and confusion, especially when done in a group. It's also good for cross-training people, so Adam knows something about what Betty is doing and vice versa. In any project, engineers have two main audiences. One is ...


7

The issue I take with this is: While some of us enjoy teaching others (manager included), it takes up my and other team members’ time, without much benefit to the product - time which could be otherwise spent in development. Is the product owner okay with the time spent on the training? If your manager is that person, then clearly the answer is yes, ...


3

If you can write good code in any language, you can write good code in any language. It is true that your experience with certain technologies will help you get on board with companies who are still using those technologies. Be advised that old technologies are still more common than you may at first have thought; my company's flagship product is coded in ...


0

What you've described doesn't sound like a "old technologies" problem. Old technologies are great - they're almost all I use and I've made a lot of money with them. Out of date stuff isn't the end of the world as long as you control the deployment environment, which this company seems like it does. The concern from me comes from point 5 - the Copying and ...


0

With his wealth of knowledge (and my lack of it) it is understandable that I need to ask him for help, sometimes quite frequently. Frequent interruptions are disruptive and it can be frustrating to change from solving one problem to another. If I am being interrupted to answer a question then I want to know that they tried their hardest to solve it before ...


0

Make a formal complaint as often as necessary. If it comes back to you in negative way, make that into another formal complaint. A friend of mine had an experience like this. Her boss was belittling and unreliable; to the point that my friend requested any direction she was given be in writing/email, because the expectations always changed and were used ...


0

Instead of interruptions, schedule a 30 min training session with him. We can't know if you are the junior asks way too many questions and interrupts the senior's work way too much and don't let him do his/her work, or the senior simply does not like to help specifically to you, or any junior in general. If he seems annoyed when he approached, say "Oh ...


1

but nothing has changed and nothing will. I think you already have your answer. Figure out how to minimize the impacts on your relationship with the mutual friend and on your career, then find another job. Many here hate that answer, but you’ve laid out a litany of obvious clues and outright attempts to fix it. Paul is Paul and doesn’t seem to realize or ...


2

If you want to speak to Paul as a manager there is nothing you can do. He is either totally oblivious (doubtful) that it's him who make people drive people off OR he don't care Or he don't care beause he blame the people and not himself. So you wouldn't sa to manager Paul nothing he haven't been told before. BUT Regarding your previous experience with him ...


6

I just think it's such a shame that this is happening and something can't be done. Yes, it is a shame. The shame is even bigger, considering that the same happens in so many companies all over the world. It's really stressful and embarrassing, seeing him treat people in this way. Yes, it is. Been there, done that. I can't imagine what sort of chaos ...


3

This is highly regional I'm in Calgary. My entire network is constantly changing jobs as there is a high demand for tech people and companies are fairly willing to hire and lay off. I worked an internship at a bank two summers ago and a fair number of people from that job are on their second position change (either internally or externally). It isn't a wear ...


5

I like to know senior/junior web developers how long work in a company in average? There is no ultimate answer to this question. They can be with a company for a time ranging from a few weeks to a life-time. Usually, people stay with a company at least a few years before moving, as a rule of thumb. There is even a trend claiming that jobs have to be ...


3

Is playing in the game room during working hours that important to you? If so, then talk to your manager and see if you can work out an arrangement so that you can have your play time during working hours. If he won't budge, then maybe this is not the right company for you. If it's not that important to you, then just drop the issue, forget about who ...


0

It depends what authority the manager has been given in your company and if they have any say over how you use your working hours. The manager may or may not have permission to stop you entering the game room during your personal time (lunch breaks). I would suggest sending back an email asking your manager to further clarify what the guidelines are. Saying ...


24

Restricting game room usage is definitely not something unreasonable. It seems that your team abused the privilege and is now paying for it. Moving forward, team leads and even regular employees should have learned to not overuse privileges to show leadership by talking to interns about unprofessional behaviour, before it reaches management. Show ...


2

I'm not sure that anyone can answer the "how/why can this happen?" question, since company culture and the reasons and restrictions on stuff like a game room are as variable as the company's themselves. The best way to get an answer is to start asking w/in your company. Here's how I'd go about that: Talk to your direct manager face to face and in ...


-9

A Manager citing a nonexisting guideline to back up his decision is a sure sign of trouble to come, doubly so if this is just because of some individuals overuse of the room, not because of a generaly problematic team habit. Thats totally unprofessional behaviour and shows unwillingness to take responsibility for his actions himself. Get in touch with his ...


3

Anything "may lead to a lawsuit" - the other company doesn't have to have a good case to file a complaint. If they have a lot more money to spend, and feel that it's the easiest way to deal with a competitor, they could try to hit you with so many legal documents that the legal fees alone force you to give up. Then again, if they're that much bigger, they ...


5

I would like to challenge a bit the question and propose an alternative solution: You can rent a cloud hosted environment that fits your needs. Depending on your needs it costs a few cents/euros an hour. You can shut it down everytime you're not using it and thus you only pay for the storage when the environment is shut down (which is ridiculously low). ...


8

If you're writing Haskell and you're not making enough to cover living expenses and a new laptop, you are being severely ripped off. I would approach whoever is paying you and explain that your laptop broke, that you are not being paid well enough to replace it on your own, and that it will affect your deliverables. They should happily supply you with a new ...


10

If you genuinely are a contractor, then you have to buy your own equipment. In the USA at least, if they provide equipment for you, you might be seen as a "statutory employee" which can get both you and them in a lot of trouble, with deliberately-punitive tax penalties. In the USA, however, that computer can be "fully depreciated in one year" under Section ...


6

2 options: 1) State your minimum salary upfront. This is my standard message to recruiters: Hi [Recruiter], I'm always open to considering new opportunities. My minimum compensation to consider taking a new position these days is £xxx,xxx. If that's compatible with your job spec, then please send it over and we can arrange a time to discuss ...


1

How can I effectively filter out companies that don't that are below my current salary expectations? As mentioned in the other answers, by being straightforward about your requirements, including the remuneration. So I have been thinking about the following approaches: - Tell them my expected salary upfront. While I think this would work to filter ...


1

You should definitely ask these recruiters what is the compensation package of the role they are offering you. If the salary doesn't match your expectations, tell the recruiter straight away, so nobody wastes anybody's time. If asked, you may provide a lower bound for your salary expectations, which may be adjusted depending on the company and on the project....


94

@Tymoteusz Paul's answer is good and I agree with him. I'll try to offer a different perspective, though. As a general rule of thumb, if you're a contractor, you need to supply your own tools (i.e. both hardware and software) to work. You're not your client's employee. You're providing them with a service for an agreed amount of money. If you hire someone ...


21

How do I ask for a budget without appearing greedy? Be honest and explain your current situation. While you are a contractor, which means that you generally are responsible for your own tools, they are getting you on the cheap (from what your post says) and clearly like you, there may be some things to do. They could lend you one of their laptops, or extend ...


3

You are a direct employee. You have an explicit "at will" clause in your contract of employment. You are ABSOLUTELY allowed to pull the eject lever, blow the canopy, and hit the silk whenever you want, and they are ABSOLUTELY allowed to shoot you down whenever they want. The latter is the risk of at-will employment, the former is one of the rewards. You ...


0

There is really one way how a small company can make a big company trust it: If you have contracts where violating that trust means the people at the head of the company are going to pay for it.


2

While certifications may not be required, you still need to convince potential clients that your team will be effective. Some sort of professional credentials or other evidence could help. Think about what makes your employees "powerful and exceptional". Determine what you could offer as verifiable proof of their ability, other than just your words. ...


1

The only way to accomplish this is to have personal connections with the company. Either through a professional network where your company and employees are known. Or friends or relatives. It is actually reasonably common in some locales, more common than not many places, but more so with govt than the private sector in my experience. But it's also fairly ...


6

I'm going to take things a step further than a lot of the other answers here: You are definitely the bad guy in this story. Let me take a few nuggets from your question: Many people also get frustrated with IT and instead contact us for help. He ignores those people Let me rephrase that for you. He doesn't work in IT. He presumably wasn't hired to ...


20

Tell them my expected salary upfront. Do almost exactly that, but instead state your minimum salary. If you are not interested in accepting offers below that amount then that's the right way to go. And when some recruiter contacts you, one of the first things to confirm (within the first 5 minutes of conversation) is that they are aware of your minimum ...


3

Some great advice I got early in my career: Every day you go to work, ask what you can do today to most move the company forwards. This is what your coworker is doing. It's smart, and is rightfully being rewarded. Yes they are behaving arrogantly at times. But give them a break. That's pretty common for young people who do well quickly and get external ...


9

How should I handle this as a co-worker? You should thank him for the great example, and emulate his behavior. Clearly, he is doing the things that are valued by the company, and is reaping the rewards. Now, if you were management instead of just a co-worker, there are other things you could do (such as valuing and rewarding different behaviors). But as a ...


7

Think about, what are you attempting to solve here? Do you find it unfair that he's getting recognition? Bury that feeling, because it's not productive. Instead, focus on what he does. Does he need to be at meetings? Or are these largely pointless unless you're involved in the project? If so, you should emulate him and only attend meetings actually of value ...


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