New answers tagged

0

In the professional world, object oriented programming is the most common paradigm, but realistically most modern software development is multi-paradigm. I would recommend developing your understanding of the object oriented paradigm to complement your knowledge of the functional paradigm, but there isn't one paradigm to rule them all.


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I think it's more organized as they follow a strict pattern that is completely object-oriented (or in theory it should be, after Java 8 introduced lambdas) A sentence like this makes me wonder if you know what you are talking about. Object Orientation is a Java staple, but lambdas aren't part of Object Orientation, it's part of Lambda Based Calculus, which ...


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Let me share my opinion on how you could actually extract code from this disgruntled employee. It is actually the stolen opinion of my incredibly smart ex ex boss. There are stick people and carrot people. This guy is a carrot person. Prize them, offer a hefty money bonus, spend an hour 1 on 1 to ask what they would like, do it. Or just pay the 3 salaries ...


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"What if(!)" your boss has insights and perspectives that you haven't had – simply because you've never yet been where (s)he is? "What if(!)" your boss has things that (s)he could offer you, if you asked? "What if(!)" your boss has discretion to change your situation, if you expressed your concerns, and your present discontent? &...


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You should not volunteer any information that can put you at a disadvantage. With plethora of candidates these days, telling B that you have an offer most likely will terminate your hiring process with them If both companies are nice destination for you, you should pursue then both. Hiring process is not an offer of employment and you cannot be certain it ...


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Here's how I see this playing out: You can either tell them, or not. Those are your choices. If you tell company B about company A's offer, company B may accelerate their current hiring process, things such as cancelling the current take-home assignment and doing an abbreviated test instead. However, company B may also say that they cannot accommodate ...


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You shouldn't tell company B about company A if you wish to go through B's hiring process. B. would most likely just pass on you if you told them about the offer before you even pass B's hiring process. That said, if company B has told you their pay range/minimum and it's more than 10% below what company A. is offering there's probably no point going ahead ...


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is it in my best interests to inform company B that I have received an offer from another company, Yes it is. If the recruiter has asked you to let them know about an offer, there is the possibility that they may accelerate your interview process and present you with an offer depending on how desirable of a candidate you are and their need to fill the ...


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If they are asking you to make a choice, wanting to have the relevant information upon which one would assess the options would not be considered pushy or unprofessional. I would expect they'd have specs handy and doubt you would be the first to ask.


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Since they offer you several choices, it's okay to ask. As an IT Domain Manager, I would (and do) find it immature if someone request a better computer that what we have, especialy if the employee isn't IT related or doesn't have special needs (ex : dev). This is the case where there are no choice. When I propose multiple computer model to an user and if he/...


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You shouldn't say "Why are you desperate to hire me?" but it seems like you could ask more indirect questions. There are a few scenarios for a company being desperate to hire: maybe a lot of people are leaving, they have a lot of new projects coming up/already started, or they have big expansion plans. Some good, some bad reasons. You could ask why ...


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Not necessarily a red flag. If they've recognized that you're more technically skilled than their interview team, they might feel there's no point in further interviews and they should just jump to the hiring process. This is a fairly good sign; if you have confidence that you're a fit for the position, you should also have confidence that the interviewers ...


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I seriously want to look for a new role in the upcoming weeks but I’m not sure how how much indication I should give of my unhappiness of the situation during my end of probation review. I certainly don’t want to just quit without having another job offer so what advice would people have about what how I express my concerns about the role to my boss? How ...


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You should always address anything like this with your manager. How can they help you sort it out if they don't know? They may not be able to do anything about it, but unless you communicate they may not know to try. This should really have been addressed in a weekly one-on-one. If you don't have that you have a bad manager (frequency can reduce after a ...


4

It's normal to have more than one project. Frequently (once a week or more often), confirm your understanding of task / project priorities with your manager. I highly recommend get this in writing, like in an email: Mr. Manager, Here is my understanding of my present projects, in priority order: {task list} Is this still valid? This will allow your ...


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What you are describing is the standard life of a BA, so maybe you have selected the wrong line of business if you dislike it that much. Sure, in your case there are more issues due to unclear business requirements, but that is to be addressed by the PO (Product Owner) that is not doing their job as expected. One more thing: the BA is not a QA Engineer, so ...


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It is very common to have two or more projects on the go at the same time. You need to learn how to manage it. Talk to your manager about how much time you should be devoting to each project. Once you know how much time to spend on each, decide how you are going to divide up your time across the day. For example, you might decide to spend a morning on one ...


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Completely normal. the workload of a singly IT project fluctuates, so you will usually get assigned several with staggered starts and deadlines, to prevent you getting in a lull with nothing to do (which is expensive for the company and boring for the employee). Usually, you work on a single project on a single day, but sometimes things happen that require ...


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It is normal to be on multiple projects for many companies. Your problem is your personal organisation of your work. You need to keep the projects separated. I am to work on both these projects without any additional pay. So long as you are working the same hours, this is totally normal unless your contract stipulates otherwise.


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It's absolutely normal.. but how you manage it depends on the various client's relations with your company. You should absolutely tell your manager (if they don't already know) that the client is requesting changes and how long each of those changes are taking. Your company can then either push back on the client or bill them appropriately. Your management ...


2

Should I just never update my LinkedIn profile for the next year or two It will be easier for you if you don't (plus the main advantage of linkedin is getting new jobs, and you've already got one :) ) But the single most important piece of advice here... Document everything Do you have a copy of everything they are coercing you to sign? Do you have ...


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Use their unprofessional LinkedIn activity against them Since they are currently (and improperly) surveilling your LinkedIn profile for the answer to a particular question, use that against them. Create a flurry of LinkedIn activity that seems to answer their question. For instance, add 5 new friends all from the same company (that isn't the company you are ...


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Question: This is stressing me out, and I don't have the money for a drawn-out legal battle. Being bullied is always stressful and those feelings are real and logical. The issue is these jokers have no leg to stand on. Refer them to the link provided by mxyzplk at most, and inform them that you are no longer willing to discuss the issue further. Any ...


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Linked-In is good for people that look for new jobs and side opportunities There is no real reason to update it otherwise. As for your current situation, you are doing everything right, do not sign anything and do not disclose ANY extraneous information. I assume, if you being bashed in to a non compete signing , you have none or not-enforceable in your ...


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My interpretation of your employer's actions is not so much that they will be taking legal action against you (despite what they claim), but that they will be threatening your new employer, either legally, or business-wise. If the threats against your new employer are strong enough, your new employer may rescind your employment offer. They are either ...


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If they insist so much to find out who is the new employer probably they want to contact one of their managers and start a discussion on the style don't dare to hire one of my employees any more. This things often end up amicably, but they could also get nasty, nobody will ever tell anything to you about it, but the mood around you might change, so you ...


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Once you start the new job you won't be able to keep it a secret for ever! The question isn't whether you can keep the old company in ignorance, it's whether their non-compete argument has any validity. From what you tell us, they seem to be acting quite unreasonably. But, with respect, that's quite normal when we only hear YOUR side of the argument! You ...


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Do you have a non-compete signed already? If no, and you don't sign this new one; then tell them to go pound sand. Do not sign anything, you have no obligation to sign paperwork from them and doing so can only hurt you. You owe them absolutely nothing and they way they're acting is honestly insane. If you've signed an offer letter with the next company and ...


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I suggest you contact a lawyer and lay out what your former employer is doing. What's going on here would seem to be a type of harassment. They may be able to write up a letter which can be forceful enough to cause the company to cease their negative behaviour towards you.


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Aside from what you’ve already been doing, I recommend not updating your LinkedIn with your new employer until after you pass your probation there. You should also block new connection notifications on your linkedin and try to avoid connecting with new colleagues for a while, if possible.


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Do not sign anything more from your current employer for any reason. You’re doing well there. Block them all on LinkedIn and social media. Do not share any further information about your future plans, even “not the same industry”, with them. “That’s none of your business” is answer enough, and they have been unprofessional enough you’d be justified in not ...


0

OK so, you're a Costa Rican national (citizen/PR/whatever) working for a Costa Rican based company, remotely, while on a 2 week vacation (tourist visa) to the USA. The rest of my answer is predicated on this assumption. I see no problem with this, in general. Most countries will allow you to work remotely for your company based in your home country while ...


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"Work from Home" isn't some sort of legal definition; it is just the latest fashionable term for any kind of remote-work/telecommuting and all the complex multi-jurisdictional contract and employment laws that has always entailed. While telecommuting from your couch, your back porch, the park down the street, the next city over, the next state ...


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It's all company dependent, as you state in your question. Depending on your role, it may be preferable to have you be able to come to the office in person periodically as opposed to always being remote. There's also implications of tax when you reside in other countries and work from another one that your current company may not be willing to take on, ...


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So, you equate WFH to include going to a separate country, hoping that your VPN will work, that medical and taxes are all okey-dokey, data-protection laws between home and away country are compatible, physical protection of work laptop, and time-zone differences are of little relevance? Does that sound about right? If you were a small-business owner, would ...


2

Sleepy on the job? Sounds like you need to change your routine. Jobs that require us to sit in front of computers all day cause eye strain and mental fatigue. It can be difficult to perform when you just feel "blah". Here are some tips that may help you stay employed: Take walks on your breaks, and stay off your phone or other screens as much ...


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Letting an entire team go is a massive red flag. Product people don't just disagree with management for the sake of it. Also standing up to management is usually a sign of a principled team. Poor performers usually become yes men and keep their heads down. Also why hire this team if they didn't share a common vision for the product. This all stinks. From ...


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Other people have already said why you shouldn't. I'm going to add another reason... Exemplify what you'd expect from other people in your team/organisation Do you expect the rest of your team to send out "mea culpa" emails when they screw up? I certainly hope not. What you should expect is for them to own the issue when it comes to analysing the ...


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On the presumption that the software defect in production was not due to intentional obscuration of the defective code, an apology email or message about the defect is unnecessary unless root cause analysis finds only you at fault through the root cause of the issue. Ultimately, your team's review process and the testing you did was part of the process to ...


1

It doesn't hurt to say, "sorry, my bad" but that won't prevent it from happening again. Take this as a learning opportunity and if anything use this as an to introduce the Org to a Post-Incident Review process. That should in a non-judgemental process, identify the procedural root causes that need improvement. See how Google handles their issues ...


1

Thinking about Jim Carey in the movie, "Liar, Liar" right now. 🤡 Don't deny that you made a mistake, but otherwise just let it go. This is software engineering, and it is an extremely complex task. Everybody knows that everybody makes mistakes. Hell, you can't do this thing without making mistakes ... which is why someone invented the term: &...


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No, absolutely not. If your development process is such, that a single person's mistake causes a problem in production, then you have a problem with your process. Focus on getting that general problem resolved, rather than obsessing over the individual bug. The last thing you want to do is to contribute to a culture in which blame for production bugs gets ...


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What would such an email achieve? The company and its employees should be concerned on how to reduce error rates. If you can propose an effective way of preventing this type of bugs in the future please go ahead. Playing the blame game is non productive even if you are blaming yourself. That being said, it is good to orally acknowledge mistakes in a casual ...


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Here is the important question: Is this person your boss/manager? If not, why is upper management going to him to ask for bug fixes or issues? These requests should be going through your manager and/or scrum leader, who triages requests, creates tickets, prioritizes, and assigns them. You should never have a case where one developer promises something to ...


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No, this was the team's mistake, not just yours It sounds like where you work has a multi-step process to get changes to production - that's good. It means that any mistake passed review by multiple people. Yes, you made a mistake, but so did the other engineers and QA, who didn't test for this either. Anyone could have made that mistake, and it just ...


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Getting and reading an unnecessary mail is an annoyance for most people. A mail that interrupts 12 people's workflow for only 5 minutes each also costs the company an hour worth of work. If possible during corona-times: Consider putting a cake in the office-kitchen with a "sorry for the bug"-note. Everyone likes that and it does not cost the ...


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These things happen. Sooner or later some more critical bugs make it into production. All these meetings and hassle that you and your team have gone through is not about a blame game like who made it or who didn't test this, etc. The reason for all meetings and so on is all to learn from and see how it can be prevented from happening in the future. Do you ...


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Mistakes happen to all of us. The key thing is to understand them, learn from them, and avoid them the next time. According to your question, you and the company did all the steps needed. On top of that, you also acknowledge your error I've made sure to acknowledge I was the one who introduced the particular code which had the bug I feel that an apology ...


2

When He makes such negative assumptions, how do I firmly (but professionally) call it out? Besides calling it out, is there something else I can do to suppress this behavior in him? Directly address the behavior as it happens. If he snickers in a meeting again, say "Why are you here if you're not going to take this meeting seriously?" Same with ...


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