New answers tagged

-1

@Isaiah3015 I am Canadian, having more than 5 yrs of experience as Business systems analyst and have an offer for BSA in USA however the degree I have is MBA ( specializing in Info Systems) , do you think there should be some scope for convincing the officer at POE ? Secondly , my spouse ( Canadian) is already on TN visa since 1 year, how can he go about ...


1

Internal job transfers are just like external ones with additional risk for the employee. The risk is that your current manager may be aware of the attempt much earlier in the process. Other than the risk stated above; the processes, procedures, budget changes, and seemingly randomness of the final decision is exactly the same. I have been denied an ...


0

I don't think that internal transfers are necessarily more complex but you are more likely to get messed around like this. When people recruit externally, they generally have already got definite approval for the additional cost, and a firm idea of what they want. Thanks to the approval process, they probably needed this additional person months ago and ...


0

Team #1: Could take along while but it does not hurt to mail to inform about the status so you can let the manager know you are still interested. Team #2: Work on the feedback you got. But I think this is not an option for now Team #3: Maybe you can find out if they did have interviews with others? It is not unrealistic that they have not been planned yet. ...


3

Many companies are risk averse. They have a product that is making revenue. Even after paying teams of developers, they are still making money. As you put it, the company has two options. Continue doing maintenance on existing products. Do minimal maintenance, and work on new products. While 2 may have potential for a new revenue stream, it is not ...


14

From your comments you knew from 11am that the work was complete, yet the PM was unavailable until 3PM, and as such could have contacted the relevant people to alert them when they were available. That didn't happen. You did, however, contact another Project Manager. There are two faults here - firstly, you didn't inform the actual project manager. ...


-2

Your post was way too long so I skipped to the end. Especially from your age, take the SysAdmin job. I'm 29 & 5 years into my career, and dude there's so much money to be had in our line of work for good people. That means so much more than just being able to code. You're paid in direct proportion to the difficulty of problem you solve, and coding only ...


1

You have to go with your gut. It’s a great labor market and those come and go. You sound bright talented and hard working. One advantage to the current company is that you have a great relationship with the boss. You can learn a lot about IT and life. Yes you have some growing up to do still. The disadvantage of the current company is who will be ...


6

I cannot tell you which choice to make, but I can give you pertinent insight. The clearance doesn't just "look good on your resume". It makes you worth more money. Jobs that require clearances pay more. The solution to contracts running out, if you go that route, is to keep six months in the bank. You assume that you will get laid off, and you use that ...


0

Your job title needs to reflect the actual work performed. Being a PhD Candidate may be hard work, but your education belongs under the "Education" section of your resume. Typically a PhD candidate is performing actual research of some form within their chosen field. If you are a research assistant, you use that and you describe the nature of the work you ...


3

Put PhD Candidate. Contrary to what others suggest here IMHO it is not lying to put it under work experience (where I am from it is considered a job and you get the normal job benefits). It might depend on the rest of your resume and the exact job you are applying for whether it is better to put it under education or work experience. I have gone both ways ...


3

Does a potential IPO indicate that the corporation's financials need some help? Not really. An IPO would be regulated by the market regulator's stringent condition. If anything, it is a sign that the company is in good financial health at the moment, as otherwise, why would a public investor invest money in it. Do companies typically fire large numbers ...


2

First off, no, a company going public is not a sign of bad financials. Quite the opposite, a company typically only goes public when things are going really well and they think they have good prospects for growing even further. No one in the public is going to buy their stock if the outlook for the company isn't good. If they are serious about going IPO, it ...


2

Unless this new business is a direct competitor of your current business, I see no reason to be exceptionally secretive with the CEO. Twenty years is the better part of an entire career, and being a CTO is so far up the ladder that you may not ever have an opportunity like what you're getting. Be honest. Twenty years also sounds a lot like "I've grown a lot,...


19

Despite your best intentions, you have exposed damaging information about your employer. It takes about 30 seconds to determine who you work for. By posting this information on a public forum without adequately protecting your own (or your employers) identity, you have potentially opened up yourself and your employer to serious consequences. Not only does ...


2

Is the git account managed on your company's servers or are you a private repo on a public profile? The reason I ask this is because at my previous company we all had public git accounts that held private repos. Until my company got their github enterprise and managed the accounts and repo access from within. Basically it removed the need to maintain a ...


8

First off, Mr. Positive has already succinctly answered your question. Report this and do it now (or as soon as you can reasonably pull the information together). I’m compelled to add a separate answer mainly because a comment alone doesn’t underscore the issue here. If you do not report this, you are missing the entire point of what Information Security ...


63

What should we do? Since it appears that you can back up you claim, take all the evidence you collected to your direct manager and let them deal with it. Depending on your companies structure, you may optionally wish to copy an HR person as well. If your company has a security officer, that would be your best option. In short, report it to the ...


4

Nobody other you can judge the value of the personal relationship you share with the CEO. 20 years is a long time to be associated with someone, at which point many personal and professional boundaries can blur. If you value the relation at a personal level, I would suggest to spend some time reflecting on your motivations and your CEO's plausible reactions ...


2

The standard practice is not to discuss with the current employer without a solid offer. What happens if your interview doesn't go good and they don't want to offer a job? The downside is that you will effectively ruin the relationship with the current employer. They might put you as risk and might withold salary increments and possibly looking for reasons ...


1

The convention seems to be: Add a new experience when your job title changes or you move to a new company/division Add projects as bullet points in the description for an experience or as a “project” and associate it with an experience. This should be consistent with how you present your experience on your resume.


0

If you want to support her in her change, but need her right now as a full time developer, there are multiple compromise options: Support her to train in her spare time, potentially providing financial support for courses and the like You can also offer to reduce her hours for a month or two so she has more spare time Give it a thought, perhaps it is ...


1

There are good points in the other answers, but I feel they do not press enough on what matters. Hopefully, it is not too late :) she insists that she would like to develop skills in areas outside of programming That is perfectly healthy behavior. Many people (I am one of them) like to diversify their work. Another many people (again, I am one of them) ...


1

You don't need to disclose your full intent when interviewing with a company. Yes, go ahead and start interviewing. Get some real-life practice on "lower-hanging-fruit" if you have the time. Then when you're confident go for the high-stakes aspirational choices. Nor should you feel at all bad about it. Big companies especially have a overwhelming ...


3

If you want practice interviewing, or you want to hone your interview skills, you should seek out appropriate channels. Interviewing with a company for whom you have no intention of working is a waste of resources. It may seem like you're "only" wasting an hour of their time, but in a highly competitive job market, wasting an interview slot can easily cost a ...


6

I don't pretend to waste anybody's time. If this is true, then don't interview with companies just for practice. If you are doing this, you ARE wasting their time. How would you like it if you applied to a company who was only conducting interviews as practice for their interviewers? If you feel that you need to practice your interviewing skills, you can ...


4

Interviewing, like everything else, gets better with experience. You need to dust off the cobwebs. Interview with a company or two before hitting the serious one. Why not? It's an hour out of your time and theirs. Worst case, it's not a fit for either of you, but they get to check you off of the list and you get experience. Best case, maybe it's ...


11

If you are really considering other companies you definitely should try with one or two of them. Pros: for the past 4 years your interview skills got rusty. You need to get back at how do you present yourself, how would you deal with HR-related questions, adjust your resume, how would you deal with the random "write me code on the board" questions, stupid "...


1

I'm going to disagree with the other answers telling you to not raise the issue and to stick it out. You have a field of interest, which is machine learning. You were brought into this company to work on a machine learning project. Your boss, who is on the machine learning team, is not your supervisor, who is the project lead for this other project you're ...


0

I pretty much agree with the other answers about sticking it out. I bet if you paid attention to those around you, you would see that they are not spending all their time on their favorite tasks. Also, for me at least, those infrastructure-type projects have become more important to me as I've gained experience. They make my "main" tasks much more pleasant, ...


3

Your founder is a cheapskate. It is not reasonable to put all the pressure of IT delivery on a single new graduate, and the only reason to do this is being unwilling to pay for the proper expertise and the time from those people to do the job properly - in other words, he's cheap. Don't sweat it, do your best and be truthful. The sooner this founder is ...


2

I've been in similar situation - boss wanted project in few months, we estimated about a year. So, from my real life experience comes these points: Be sure to have a paper trail of your estimate. If there is only a paper trail of estimate by your boss, you are in a bad place. "Work harder, work faster, work overtime" all can make software happen faster, but ...


2

My employer wants me to do a work of 6 months in just 2 months I want you to work for me for 12 months, for free. Wants don't necessarily translate into reality. Now the two of you need to sit down and figure out what you can deliver and what he can get. I recommend spending some of your time looking into project management and planning, which are skills ...


10

Being rigid in what you want to learn vs not learn and what you want to work upon vs not work upon will not help you as an Intern to gather practical learning and work experience. Life doesn't always go the way we want it to. Even during regular job, you will many times end up getting (grunt) work/projects/assignments that you will not enjoy. Since you ...


5

I wouldn't bring it up. To me, as a co-op or intern, that fact that you say that you are learning is a good thing. The purpose of such work experiences is to learn and, well, get experience. It seems like you're being asked to do things within the realm of your education and competence and are getting the appropriate support from your company and colleagues ...


4

Perhaps in a nicer way, you need to tell your employer, "Fast, good or robust. Pick two." This is the Iron Triangle, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_management_triangle, and no amount of wishing, ranting, wanting or needing changes the fact that limits exist. If his argument is the company will fold without it in two months, I would suggest you ...


26

So, your employer: Has only 1 person (you) on an important project That one and only person is someone who's fresh out of university. This shows that either the project is not as important to him as he says it is, or that he's completely irrational. If the project was really that important, he would hire someone with a serious experience to lead it... ...


37

From some of your comments, your boss has legitimate business concerns about having a product which can generate revenue. Your analysis of work necessary has established that the work wouldn't be done for six months, that's a long time to go without revenue. You need to find a solution somewhere in the middle that is an acceptable compromise for both sides....


3

It seems like you know allready what work has to be done. Make a plan of all the steps and estimate generously. You can then give him an estimate for the core product and different features and ask him to prioritize. If you just say to him "this will take 6 months" and he doesn't know why he will think the 2 months will work if he just squeezes hard enough. ...


9

he already told me that we will have to work harder and faster if that is the case That sentence is a appear to me as a red line. What does he expect ? more work hours from you or just to put pressure into you ? In any case it's a bad situation, but before putting all your energy inside it please have a talk with him and let him know that your time isnt ...


38

Be realistic about what you think you are capable of doing. Do not ever promise or agree to something that you don't believe that you can do. Do not overwork yourself and sacrifice your family and sanity to try to do something that you don't believe is possible. If your boss thinks that the work you're doing is much easier than it actually is, there is ...


81

You are not the owner. You get paid a salary, and you work for that salary. If the owner wants you to work more, he needs to pay overtime. You can tell him that it will take longer. Then you come to work and work 40 hours a week, not more. 40 hours is most healthy for you, and it is most effective. You don’t do more useful work in more hours, you just get ...


3

This was going to be a comment. But there aren't enough characters for what I want to say. If you have 15 people, and 3 are on "report" with 5 reviews left uncompleted, there's a real problem either with leaders who are ineffectively leading, or with the corporate finances and a large reduction is being planned. In addition to getting projects done, a team ...


7

Generally speaking, when somebody says something to you and then talks to somebody else and you get totally blindsided, make sure you have your conversation in writing. Ask your questions in writing. If the reply is verbally, sum it up and write it down again in a mail that you send to the person in question. Pretend it's to make sure you got it right. Who ...


6

Well, if somebody (or the business) wants to get rid of you, there is really not much that can save you, though it's somewhat unlikely the team lead is conspiring to get rid of (at least) 4 employees. You shouldn't assume a PIP is the first step on the way to getting rid of an employee. Also, don't discount the possibility that the team lead thought the ...


1

I've seen this a lot, both with government (which has an astonishing backlog of legacy code that badly needs to be rewritten) and with many large, older companies. You are young and needed a first job, so you were a good candidate. It can work out for you as long as you don't fall into what I like to call the "First Job Trap". I have observed that people ...


6

Is really uncommon to work on multiple projects with different roles at the same time? Actually, no. It is not uncommon that one person undertakes tasks and roles for multiple projects. However, your current job description is colorful above average, and sometimes not desirable. Why? Because of two factors: attention / focus - when lost, leads to mistakes ...


2

At that scale I would say it's uncommon, but it's definitely not necessarily a bad thing. If your expertise in a particular area can be utilised on a different project and save the company a few hours of time compared using someone else, it's a good investment. I listened to many comments from external people saying that they are very surprised (someone ...


5

Normally those numbers are communicated to the managers before you're in the interview, so it would be very hard to come back and change them after the fact without some solid reason. You also don't have many options to play too much hardball (pretending you got an offer you'd like them to match) because of how everything is done through recruiters here. If ...


6

Assuming your team lead is your direct manager, I would schedule 1-1 time with him to see how he defines success in your first year. In that conversation, you can bring up that you are eager to learn, have capacity to work on new projects and want to accomplish the goals that you have both defined and documented. This exercise will give you a window into ...


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