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0

I want to add that you need to remember that your CV has two audiences: Recruiters/HR who don't know how the technology is being used, and are possibly just looking for some key buzzwords. Technical leads who do know how the technology is used, and aren't going to be impressed with just a list of buzzwords, or self-assessed x/10 ratings for technologies. ...


1

It depends India and the U.S. and China and Vietnam have wildly different cultures and norms around when and when not to use honorifics. In the U.S. you generally the person's first name, or whatever there chosen name is without honorifics. My general rules for using honorifics (as an American) Address everyone inside the company the same way If you mix ...


0

You should only "embellish" in written form what you would be comfortable explaining under duress (e.g. a tough interviewer). Short anecdote: I once inflated my competency in an uncommon foreign language by writing on my CV that I was 'fluent' and was caught off guard by an interviewer who switched into that language. It was a totally embarrassing moment. ...


1

I'd suggest grouping them by your competency at each, with each group being comma-separated. This allows you to list technologies you have some experience with, while also highlighting which technologies you're best at. Of course these wouldn't give that much information in absolute terms (one person may call themselves an "expert" while someone else might ...


0

On my resume, I indicated the strengths of my various skills with what boils down to a progress bar or star ranking. This lets me note job description-related skills that I have some knowledge of but that aren't my core strengths. I think the "float" is more precise than a "boolean" anyway, so it works for all parties. As an ascii-art example of what I'm ...


3

You do not have to compete with people who fake their CVs. On one hand, it's true that you must learn to present yourself in the best possible way: this involves having a quite mature conscience on how you communicate both on your resume and during interviews. On the other hand, do not fake anything nor feel pressured by people who do so. People who fake ...


9

I am told that I should learn to present myself better and "stop being so modest". That's true. In other words, how much ever good something is, if it can't be sold, it's of no use. As you might have already figured out, a resume / CV is your gate-pass to the interview. What you know and don't know, and whether you are fit for the role will be decided ...


0

You might be surprised to learn that most people in business hate giving speeches and lectures, but it's done because it's part of the job. Your managers have now made it part of your job. This is a great way to gain exposure in your company and industry, but I agree - it can be scary the first few times you do it. However... you CAN go on training courses ...


0

It looks like your bosses want to start building a library of these lectures to distribute without additional cost of an employee giving them. You may see it as an opportunity to request a raise and paid preparation / study time in order to better yourself to be more comfortable giving these lectures


5

I used to be a very shy person who didn't want to be in pictures. And in a lot of ways I still am. Yet I have recorded more videos than I can count and they have been seen by hundreds of thousands of people. With that background, some tips: first, you don't need to record video of you at all. They want you to do a summary of the course? Fine. Use a screen ...


9

Have an honest conversation with your line manager about this. Tell them clearly that you're uncomfortable, and explain why it makes you uncomfortable (it may help to sit down and make a list of reasons beforehand). Also tell them clearly that you don't want to do it. Since their goal is (presumably) to get the videos made and viewed, having a reluctant ...


1

I like @motosubatu's answer, but feel that some details are missing (too many for comments). Should I open a ltd company and a business bank account first? or should I get an accountant first to help me? Either. If you approach an accountant, they'll deal with everything for you for a large fee. You could instead do all the paperwork yourself and file ...


-3

(2) You absolutely must give an address where you can be found and where mail can be delivered. If any mail is delivered to that address, it is legally delivered. If you don’t read it, and suffer consequences, tough luck. And if I sue you and send bailiffs to that address, you better be there. So I very, very strongly suggest you give your home address, ...


1

Should I open a ltd company and a business bank account first? or should I get an accountant first to help me? You can do the accountant bit first then create the company, then the bank account (you can't open a business bank account for a business that doesn't exist obviously) I need an address for for my ltd company. I don't want to use my home address....


0

I will answer per the OP question but also the following comment of OP : All things like documentation, customer support, preparing SRS do me and the intern. Actually, 90% of the work done by me since the intern developer just learning everything... But all design related works and support request, documentation related to design do other two designers. –...


0

So the question and a bunch of the answers really miss some key things: What is the 'estimate' for? Pricing, Internal costing/ budget, Schedule? Is the estimate for the developer themselves or for others? Does the team or individual have any track record of projects? Are there milestone deliverables that can help track how accurate the estimates are? Sounds ...


0

There are several parts to the answer. First, if you are not using a formal estimating methodology, that produces artifacts that can be sanity-checked and an estimate that is solely based on the data in the artifacts and on coefficients that are calibrated based on actuals from previous projects, you are h0zed from the beginning. Books to read: "Software ...


0

Remind your manager that your estimates are worst case, and worst case estimates are supposed to be on the high side. I would also provide an "average case" estimate, something like, "In the worst case, if everything explodes, this might take 2 weeks. But more realistically if everything goes normally it will take 3 days. I will promise you 2 weeks, but I ...


1

I can't believe none of the existing answers mention Planning Fallacy. Anyway, I'd suggest doing some googling/research/etc on Planning Fallacy - a mental bias that causes people to systematically underestimate how much time things will take. It'll not only help you figure out the way to interact with your manager, but help you understand why you need to ...


8

I'm surprised no one referenced this great talk from Uncle Bob: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eisuQefYw_o The issue of estimate and missing the mark regularly in my team was raised last year and one of our agile coach referenced the talk. The TLDW: estimate are not a single hard number and most have three quality: accuracy, precision and honesty. "I'll ...


0

If your manager is being rude or confrontational, that’s one thing. And I won’t address that. Otherwise, discussions over variances in estimates is common in many methodologies, especially agile. In fact, in order to account for how different estimates can be from different parties. Almost all agile “estimation” schemes involve providing an estimation ...


9

Giving only worst case estimates is not useful. Over time they will be wrong and your estimates won't have credibility, as possibly evidenced by your manager's questions. Sure, some times things go wrong and it is the worst case. But other times things are fine and even a few times things go great. If your estimates aren't reliable over time, they lose ...


11

Although the last thing you want to do is contact your team lead. It may be that it is exactly what you have to do. You've tried talking to him about it professionally, you've tried asking your team mates and you've tried carrying on as "normal". None of these methods have worked for you as it's effecting your work. A scrum team needs to communicate. That's ...


1

I think what you're experiencing is the same thing that happens to a person when they become roommates with a good friend. The friend you thought you got along with so well, you find you just don't relate to as well as you thought. I've had the same thing happen to me -- I got referred to a company by a friend. I thought we'd enjoy working together, ...


1

Some remarks, from somebody who's done both jobs (but still loves and does dev). Make sure your current supervisor knows about your ambition to learn more work skill. Frame it as "more and better skills" rather than "I'm bored." You may get good advice and support from that direction. Product management / product owner work is really good work. It gives ...


10

There's a simple fact: If you give a good estimate, then 50% of the time the work will take longer, and 50% of the time the work will take less time. If it's different for you, then you are not giving good estimates. There's another simple fact, and that is that many managers don't understand this simple fact. You give an estimate, and they take this as a ...


2

A good rule of thumb (for any task, not just software development) is to estimate how long it will take / how much it will cost and then double it. If you think something will take 2 days then quote 4 days as your estimate. Customers (in this case your manager) are always happy when something is achieved earlier / cheaper than quoted and never (or rarely) ...


12

Do not EVER reduce your estimates, unless you have new information pertaining to some specific part. Most developer estimates, especially from those inexperienced at it, are always optimistic - in this respect, providing worst case is probably a good idea, although presenting as a range from worst to most likely (not "best") is better. However, he started ...


1

I don't think providing only worst-case estimates is a good idea. Like the name suggests, they are not realistic. After all business can't be run in catastrophe mode all the time. However, you could provide a range of estimates. From realistic to worst-case. And explain the risks/uncertainties there is and how they affect the estimates. This would give ...


25

Personally, I think you are right on the money giving worst-case estimates. It is much better to get something done in a shorter amount of time that they're expecting ('underpromise and overdeliver'), than the opposite. Running over time estimates is stressful and no fun for anyone. My strategy for estimating tasks is basically a function of 'how much ...


62

Take a deep breath, and start over. Remember: What seems to be very realistic for you, can be seem arbitrary for someone else who does not know the details that you know. Ask yourself: are you providing enough data with your estimates to show / support your estimation? If yes, Are they detailed enough and shows the complexity of the work that needs to ...


3

There's a big difference between I've done active work on 15 different projects in the last 4 years I'm supposed to be working on 15 different projects right now. The area I'm in right now has 3 people, and we easily have more than 15 projects under our responsibility. But we're not actively working on all of them at any given point in time. In fact, we'...


1

You asked, What advice would you give to someone in my situation looking to get into a more technical role without a formal background for it? What options are there? All of the general advice about career changes would apply here, the fact that it's non-technical to technical is just a detail. Make sure you understand the field you're getting in to, ...


2

One really important challenge you'll face if you try to move your job title to "developer" is that you'll be moving from a relatively senior role into a junior one. You'll have/surpass many of the skills a senior developer needs in navigating the business, but to be a senior developer you'll need to learn most of the skills a developer uses when making ...


1

You asked, Is this a normal situation for software engineers? That's a tough question to answer without a lot of context - some software engineers may only have one or two projects that last years while others may do 15 or 20 projects in a given year. It's probably more typical for the latter to be the case in smaller companies where software is a means ...


2

Is this a normal situation for software engineers? Or is this the time for looking for new jobs? This is a sign both the company is growing and that you are growing expertise on the company software, and as such you are asked to handle a wider variety of task. For this part, it is "normal" as in to be expected if the company don't have the money/the ...


16

I have started around 7-8 projects in these 3 years and updated around 7-8 old projects also. So currently I have involved more than 15 projects. New requirements/ changes are coming each month for all old projects. So it is very hard to remember and working all projects together. All of these points to the fact that your company is seriously under-staffed. ...


1

While it is impossible to say what exactly would happen in your case, in my experience (both from being recruited and hiring), it is a combination of HR and the line manager. There will typically be a set of terms and conditions that any role needs to adhere to. On top of that most medium-large companies have established salary bands that go with the job ...


3

Who determines the details of the offer, the salary etc.? The answer does varies organization to organization. Generally it's the hiring manager (the person you report to or eventually report to) that you are negotiating with for your salary, signing bonus, relocation, title, etc, but the manager may be constrained by their budget and other company policies ...


1

I can see from the comments that it has only been three hours, it is likely that they just haven't seen the email, yet, especially if it is used for all recruitment contact. How do I, professionally, should handle this situation? Wait for a day or so longer, then you could try emailing again, or calling if you have the number. should I just move on ...


1

Your situation is not pleasant for sure, and you need a good strategy to win. Of course, you always have the back-up option to leave. If you want to "fight", you need to prepare: be able explain clearly and shortly what you do; be able to explain clearly and shortly what are your expectations from the team, in order to be able to do your work; it might ...


5

At 33 you could easily have 25 more years software development ahead of you. Anything you can do at this point to widen your skills and experience is worth doing - you have no idea where your career may take you in the future. You should jump at the chance to work on something new, generalists are much more employable than specialists.


3

Recently my boss asked me whether I would do also back end for some project. It sounded like choice, not ultimatum. What can I do in such situation? You can decide if you want to do it or not. If you do, reply "Certainly, boss! I'd be happy to do that." If you do not, reply "I'd really rather not. I prefer to continue to work on front end tasks so ...


2

This is hard to answer without knowing the culture of the company and what your relationship with them is like, and I think that goes to why people are conflicted about when you should talk to them. How good your relationship is there will probably need to govern how much you tell them. If you're not sure, I would suggest that you tell them you are thinking ...


1

What is the best way to propose becoming a remote engineer if I am willing to take a demotion, pay cut, travel for work as much as they need, etc? I was thinking of proposing this 60 days before we move to give enough time to either let them decide, or start looking for new jobs myself. Don't offer to make any concessions... initially. Why give up ...


1

I know that expecting a remote employee to be a good "Lead" in charge of other engineers is a stretch, but I would be happy with just being a Senior engineer if I could swing that. That, my friend, is not entirely true. Many good leaders and managers oversee and manage geographically distributed teams, from different cultural backgrounds and work ethics. ...


13

should I just move on even if they offered me a retry? Absolutely not! If they offer you a retry, they're clearly OK with it. Why second guess what they might or might not really mean? Of course - it might be that they don't offer you a retry, for whatever reason. If that's the case you'll just have to chalk it up to experience and move on.


3

My question is - has anyone out there used networking to be more successful in IT? Me, networking and community has been huge for me. I met a ton of interesting people, interacted with people in open source, got my current job and my last one and I'm literally writing this answer from a fancy(ish) hotel room the conference I'm speaking and paid for. The ...


3

Seems like no one has answered the question flat out: Yes Networking does work in IT. I got all of my jobs since graduation via networking. But I never went to a single networking seminar or any lunches or gathered business cards or any of the things you describe. To me, networking in IT is about working with other people - who don't even need to be IT ...


1

your manager sounds like an asshole who likes using his power to be unnecessarily difficult. personally I would go to his boss and get him to sign it off, also if this is a personal project you are completing on your own time with your own resources then there is no reason why you should have to "justify [to my team manager] why these projects are ...


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