Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
177

I think the thing to do is to explain to them what you think happened, explain that you've disconnected from the browser history syncing done by chrome, so that they won't see this any more. Explain how you were browsing on your own hardware and in your own time, unaware that chrome was syncing. Ask if they can view the time of the events, and so verify ...


62

Take a deep breath, and start over. Remember: What seems to be very realistic for you, can be seem arbitrary for someone else who does not know the details that you know. Ask yourself: are you providing enough data with your estimates to show / support your estimation? If yes, Are they detailed enough and shows the complexity of the work that needs to ...


44

No. I listen to music at work for a number of reasons: My music hides the noise of the radio played by the support staff (which I hate with a passion). It is incredibly annoying and distracting to have music/radio that you hate forced upon you. Music can add white-noise, thus reducing the distraction of other people's conversations. My workplace can get ...


29

"worker should use the software he or she can use the most smoothly" No. Employees should use the software that makes the business as a whole function most effectively. Reasons an employee should not have his own personal choice include: Licensing. The company may already have licences for product A, and not wish to spend on product B. Alternatively they ...


29

No, the software development company should not play music in the development room. It is difficult to account for different tastes in music, and unwanted music is an intrusion that can negatively impact the concentration of the developers. You say that half of the developers have headphones on, which you assume to mean that they are listening to music. ...


27

I suspect any "this isn't ethical!" objection you raise will be countered by, "you synced your accounts" or "you were using a work computer to access your personal accounts." Very likely you signed some sort of electronic usage policy thing when you started your current job, too, which probably details how this works at your company. Chrome syncs your ...


26

Without them knowing you created said software. Hold your breath, first check how many clauses of your contract you have breached already. Unless I'm very wrong, you used "insider" knowledge to design and create a software, and now you want to "sell" it to your employer. I already informed my boss of the offer. You might be in trouble already, I'll ...


25

He literally said to you, “we can keep you here if we revise your salary,” and you agreed. Then he checked this with you again, and asked for evidence of what you were paid last time, and then paid you that. It sounds to me as if there was ample communication and feedback. Your contract was modified for cause, based on your performance during the probation ...


25

Personally, I think you are right on the money giving worst-case estimates. It is much better to get something done in a shorter amount of time that they're expecting ('underpromise and overdeliver'), than the opposite. Running over time estimates is stressful and no fun for anyone. My strategy for estimating tasks is basically a function of 'how much ...


23

In my experience allowing individuals to choose their tools usually leads to better outcomes. There are several reasons for this: People will use what they feel is most productive. Some prefer full blown IDEs, some prefer lightweight editors, some prefer polyglot IDEs, some prefer specialised IDEs. Diversity is good. If one IDE supports a great feature ...


21

One of the most frustrating and stressful things for human beings is to have no control over their environment. People who wear headphones at work are often doing so in order to exert some control over their work environment, for example to shut out distracting conversations or other noises in an open-plan office (I know I do). Playing even quiet, soft ...


19

For the non-software developers: As a software developer, you typically write code that exists only on your machine, and then when you think it’s fine, you issue a “pull request”, and someone reviews it, and either asks for changes to be made, or combines it into your company’s product. As long as the ”pull request” isn’t handled, it’s as good as if the work ...


18

I’m a senior software engineer, and I’ve been involved in the hiring of several web developers. I also have an unusual academic background (a bachelors in English Literature). So let me give you my perspective. A master’s degree in geochemistry is not worth a computer science degree. But it is not worth nothing, and is obviously more valuable than a non-...


18

If the codebase is still something that's in use in your company then you are probably going to be required to maintain it at least so far as is required to keep up that usage. As for anything that would fall into "labor of love" territory, probably not. Basically work on it at work, as directed by your boss - anything else is at your discretion (and I ...


18

It sounds like your tech department is in a bad situation. That doesn't necessarily mean you are in the bad situation. In my answer I am making the assumption that you are a developer and you have some knowledge about the systems involved but not as much as the person who is leaving. I am also assuming that the company can recover from this: Now someone ...


17

Your boss gave you the option of using the community version (not legal) or a different piece of software (less efficient). By making it your choice, he's avoiding responsibility. However, that also means you need to choose the legal option, even if you are less efficient. Because if comes out, you are the one who will take the fall. If, after changing ...


15

No, getting another skill in your resume is not bad. It never is. Testing is an important part of the software development process and even as a programmer, you will be helped by knowing these skills. If it turns out you're stuck as a tester for a long period when you really want to program, then you should talk to your boss. If you both agree that this is ...


15

Does anyone have additional ideas for the section "Possible solution" or (optimally) was in a similar Situation? Yes. You REALLY need a written contract for this type of thing. Any details that need to be worked out: payments, support, access to source code, bug fixing, liability, rights to distribute, IP, etc. need to be written down and agreed on by both ...


14

I actually did that. I worked remotely for my employer while spending extended amount of time overseas. However I had to quit as a full-time employee and start a company in the USA to make this happen, and, just FYI, setting all of this up to be a fully legal and workable solution was quite an endeavor with a lot of involvement from business tax experts. ...


14

It's unethical. In the companies I worked damage prevention was highly valued "oh that would have been very expensive, if we wouldn't have catched this now". And the fact that you reviewed all the specs again and found that issue in the first place , would make you a very valuable employee. But If I would ever find out that you hid that to make you look ...


13

Short answer: Cost in time and money to build and retest a standard operating environment does not generally make it viable. Many updated browsers require up to date hardware and operating systems. This is a massive cost in many organisations, who spend considerable time and cost building their standard operating environment (SOE). Depending on the ...


13

You can certainly ask. However, when you write code for an organization, they own any and all code that you write. They will most likely say no for the following reasons: You could be taking the code to a competitor so they have a more in-depth view into their competitions processes and thus give them a business edge. You could be taking the code for ...


13

Generally, this is how it works: Time from your residence, to the FIRST work location of your day, is unpaid. Travel time to any subsequent locations, after the first location, is paid time. Travel time back to the first location is paid time. Going home from there is unpaid time.


13

When I said I wanted to continue using the program, he told me to use the community version or change to a different program. I've tried a few open source alternatives, but nothing seems as good for what I do as the program for which we had a license and I am less effective at getting my work done when I use one of the alternatives. Assuming you feel ...


13

If you intend to choose an OS that no one else at your company uses you should ask your manager if he has any objections to your choice, or if there is a standard configuration used by members of his team filling your role. Is it generally a bad idea for any other reason, besides compliance/security concerns? Seeking the input of your new peers is ...


13

You are playing well above your pay grade. Let your manager manage your colleague. An outcome like "the project got finished but wasn't great, one of the interns worked hard but the other was a nightmare" is common as dirt in this industry. Do the tasks your manager has assigned to you. When you're out of tasks, go ask for more. When you can't do something ...


12

Is this a big deal, or is the company trying to determine whether or not I have basic programming skills? The only people who can really answer this question are at the company where you interviewed. Nobody here knows for sure what their goal was with this task, nor how they will score it. We can only speculate. Most companies would be more interested in ...


12

No. This is not okay. You say that the software was developed in secret, and that you'd be looking at selling them the software without them knowing that you were the one that produced it, and that the software was created with the encouragement of a guy who'll be part of deciding whether or not this gets used, and who's set himself up to get a kickback by ...


12

Do not EVER reduce your estimates, unless you have new information pertaining to some specific part. Most developer estimates, especially from those inexperienced at it, are always optimistic - in this respect, providing worst case is probably a good idea, although presenting as a range from worst to most likely (not "best") is better. However, he started ...


12

Here are some potential issues you can think of: Is the ownership of the software clear? Can the manager / company claim at a later date that the tool was developed with company resources etc, and so the company is anyway the rightful owner of it? From your description, it doesn't look like the manager is coming from this direction, but Legal/Finance ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible