177

I think the thing to do is to explain to them what you think happened, explain that you've disconnected from the browser history syncing done by chrome, so that they won't see this any more. Explain how you were browsing on your own hardware and in your own time, unaware that chrome was syncing. Ask if they can view the time of the events, and so verify ...


129

Tl;DR: Raising complaints is expensive. Leaving is cheap. The hunt to leave can be fun. There are lots of places for engineers to go. Companies do a lot of things to make people want to leave without realizing it, including saving $250 on IntelliJ by driving away a dev who cost 10K to recruit. Here are my thoughts: It is probably not just your software ...


88

It's acceptable for software engineers to job hop if they have better opportunities. The unanimous consent of your developer-employees is that your company is not a good opportunity. This is of little surprise, based on the feedback you receive, combined with your disregard for the same. You are calling "no promotion track", "no feedback" and "no payment ...


62

Take a deep breath, and start over. Remember: What seems to be very realistic for you, can be seem arbitrary for someone else who does not know the details that you know. Ask yourself: are you providing enough data with your estimates to show / support your estimation? If yes, Are they detailed enough and shows the complexity of the work that needs to ...


56

The average tenure at the moment is 5 months. Look at it this way: The company failed their probation period with them. They looked at the company from the inside and said "yeah, not good enough, not what I wanted". Shockingly, that is exactly what a probationary period is for. One quit after his request for a paid software tool called Jetbrains was ...


46

For the non-software developers: As a software developer, you typically write code that exists only on your machine, and then when you think it’s fine, you issue a “pull request”, and someone reviews it, and either asks for changes to be made, or combines it into your company’s product. As long as the ”pull request” isn’t handled, it’s as good as if the work ...


44

No. I listen to music at work for a number of reasons: My music hides the noise of the radio played by the support staff (which I hate with a passion). It is incredibly annoying and distracting to have music/radio that you hate forced upon you. Music can add white-noise, thus reducing the distraction of other people's conversations. My workplace can get ...


41

It could help if you step back from the immediate issue and consider the "meta" nature of this. Pull requests are just a symptom. What you have there is a manager who wants to keep all the power (even such a petty one as reviewing/approving code changes), does not want to delegate, yet can't or won't do the job himself. This can happen in any aspect of the ...


40

There are a few odd things that come to mind and a few questions. However my main concern is: If two guys wrote the bot and deployed the victory, why did the other female colleague know about it? Must have been told and possibly told because you would then hear about it. There is a potential for it to spread and a future potential for it to be used against ...


39

You clarified this in one of your comments: The manager of the dev team doesn't like paying for software What you are essentially saying is that management doesn't like paying for their developers, beyond just their basic salary. They are probably given sub-par tools for the job. JetBrains licenses are only a few hundred dollars a year. I can practically ...


37

Tld;dr - no, it's not normal - why are you still there, especially if you live up to the summary you gave of yourself? Bug tracking system? Too expensive. So we just don't track bugs in a centralized way. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_issue-tracking_systems - just look at the free ones. 5 Best Free and Open Source Bug Tracking Software for ...


37

Do you think, that this is a reasonable thing to ask from a software engineer? Yes. You've been asked to drive and maintain quality of the software, it's perfectly in line of what is expected from a developer, even if thankless. Have you ever come across something similar? Many times. And what I did was take ownership of the quality and implement ...


29

"worker should use the software he or she can use the most smoothly" No. Employees should use the software that makes the business as a whole function most effectively. Reasons an employee should not have his own personal choice include: Licensing. The company may already have licences for product A, and not wish to spend on product B. Alternatively they ...


29

No, the software development company should not play music in the development room. It is difficult to account for different tastes in music, and unwanted music is an intrusion that can negatively impact the concentration of the developers. You say that half of the developers have headphones on, which you assume to mean that they are listening to music. ...


27

I suspect any "this isn't ethical!" objection you raise will be countered by, "you synced your accounts" or "you were using a work computer to access your personal accounts." Very likely you signed some sort of electronic usage policy thing when you started your current job, too, which probably details how this works at your company. Chrome syncs your ...


26

Without them knowing you created said software. Hold your breath, first check how many clauses of your contract you have breached already. Unless I'm very wrong, you used "insider" knowledge to design and create a software, and now you want to "sell" it to your employer. I already informed my boss of the offer. You might be in trouble already, I'll ...


25

He literally said to you, “we can keep you here if we revise your salary,” and you agreed. Then he checked this with you again, and asked for evidence of what you were paid last time, and then paid you that. It sounds to me as if there was ample communication and feedback. Your contract was modified for cause, based on your performance during the probation ...


25

Personally, I think you are right on the money giving worst-case estimates. It is much better to get something done in a shorter amount of time that they're expecting ('underpromise and overdeliver'), than the opposite. Running over time estimates is stressful and no fun for anyone. My strategy for estimating tasks is basically a function of 'how much ...


23

In my experience allowing individuals to choose their tools usually leads to better outcomes. There are several reasons for this: People will use what they feel is most productive. Some prefer full blown IDEs, some prefer lightweight editors, some prefer polyglot IDEs, some prefer specialised IDEs. Diversity is good. If one IDE supports a great feature ...


22

It sounds like your tech department is in a bad situation. That doesn't necessarily mean you are in the bad situation. In my answer I am making the assumption that you are a developer and you have some knowledge about the systems involved but not as much as the person who is leaving. I am also assuming that the company can recover from this: Now someone ...


22

how did it become acceptable for software engineers to always be job switching? The software industry, perhaps more than any other, rewards disloyalty and punishes loyalty. You should not be surprised that people do what they are incentivized to do. So, how then did we end up in a situation where disloyalty is rewarded? Half my time is spent replacing ...


21

One of the most frustrating and stressful things for human beings is to have no control over their environment. People who wear headphones at work are often doing so in order to exert some control over their work environment, for example to shut out distracting conversations or other noises in an open-plan office (I know I do). Playing even quiet, soft ...


18

I’m a senior software engineer, and I’ve been involved in the hiring of several web developers. I also have an unusual academic background (a bachelors in English Literature). So let me give you my perspective. A master’s degree in geochemistry is not worth a computer science degree. But it is not worth nothing, and is obviously more valuable than a non-...


18

If the codebase is still something that's in use in your company then you are probably going to be required to maintain it at least so far as is required to keep up that usage. As for anything that would fall into "labor of love" territory, probably not. Basically work on it at work, as directed by your boss - anything else is at your discretion (and I ...


18

The simplest answer is because recruiters are calling and opening up opportunities for them. To your specific examples.... One quit after his request for a paid software tool called Jetbrains was denied. Once you get used to certain ergonomics of this software, it's really, really, really hard to live without it. To a non-programmer, it will be like ...


18

The premise is wrong - at least for your case: It is not generally acceptable for software engineers to job hop! While it is arguably somewhat more common for software engineers to switch jobs more often nowadays than other more traditional professions, the times OP mentions in the question are well below accepted standards. Just because people hop away ...


18

You clarified this in one of your comments Our niche is trying to be people's 2nd dev job, so our pitch is mostly to people inclined to quit. [...] So everyone we hire is poached from somewhere or applied to the posting. You specifically hire people who are prone to "job-hopping", so you must expect for them to be likely to job-hop. People who were more ...


17

Your boss gave you the option of using the community version (not legal) or a different piece of software (less efficient). By making it your choice, he's avoiding responsibility. However, that also means you need to choose the legal option, even if you are less efficient. Because if comes out, you are the one who will take the fall. If, after changing ...


16

Does anyone have additional ideas for the section "Possible solution" or (optimally) was in a similar Situation? Yes. You REALLY need a written contract for this type of thing. Any details that need to be worked out: payments, support, access to source code, bug fixing, liability, rights to distribute, IP, etc. need to be written down and agreed on by both ...


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