Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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6

For the non-software developers: As a software developer, you typically write code that exists only on your machine, and then when you think it’s fine, you issue a “pull request”, and someone reviews it, and either asks for changes to be made, or combines it into your company’s product. As long as the ”pull request” isn’t handled, it’s as good as if the work ...


1

Arrange an open and honest discussion between your team and your manager. Talk about the business concerns - the features that you develop are not getting put in front of customers. That's a real cost - the business is paying for those features, but the customers are not getting them until months after they were complete. This costs the business both money ...


0

How much effort is it to merge these when they do get approved? I appreciate something small with no conflicts will be minimal, but when you have merge conflicts? What's the opportunity cost? (what could you have been doing instead). What is the probable cost to the business of finding the one feature they suddenly need in a hurry cannot be completed for ...


5

The problem is bigger that you manager's availability / willingness to review and accept / reject the pull request - if a pull request can be in the queue for 6 months to 1 year, that indicates, the work is not really relevant / useful and the priorities are wrong. No work, important enough and short enough to be contained in one pull request, will be ...


5

This is a perfect opportunity to a) get a raise and b) find out how quickly your management learns. Do your best to take over the knowledge and job of your boss. In the process of doing so, ask your manager for a raise - to the wage level your boss wanted or very little below that. If they accept, you got a nice raise and you know that management can ...


2

That depends a bit on how you feel about the company and your career there: Every challenge is also an opportunity to rise to the occasion. For me, I would want to understand how the company handles this. Obviously the senior leadership screwed up badly by allowing a bus event to happen and, and more importantly, by being vulnerable to a bus event in the ...


18

It sounds like your tech department is in a bad situation. That doesn't necessarily mean you are in the bad situation. In my answer I am making the assumption that you are a developer and you have some knowledge about the systems involved but not as much as the person who is leaving. I am also assuming that the company can recover from this: Now someone ...


2

It certainly sounds like it's going to get worse before it gets better. The issues you've described are at least partially your boss' fault, I hope you're aware of that. That being said, are you compensated well enough to weather the oncoming crap storm? If so, you may want to stick it out and see what happens. Things may be bad in the short term but they ...


2

You should quit. You are not long there and there is already enough to warrant leaving. It is not even two months and you already find a pile of poor practices. More importantly, since you are not long there, you are not really invested in neither the project nor your career in this company. So nothing stops you. I have worked with such management/leads ...


2

Getting professional experience is more than just improving your technical skills with real-world programming challenges, but also learning to navigate your way through a dysfunctional workplace. No company you'll work for will do things the right way, and even less the right way for you. Startups move fast and break things, big established companies drown ...


3

Start looking for a job now. I was in a similar situation in my first IT job after graduating. Where it was apparent that it wasn't a very good job from the start - I convinced my self to 'at least stay for a year, because it wouldn't be a good look to leave early'. The problem with that kind of thinking, is that: It might take longer than you think ...


3

Look for a different job. Until you find one with a legally binding job offer, you stay where you are, because it puts money in your pocket. In parallel, you can try to improve things at your place. Even if it comes to nothing, it is a good learning experience. Write down what is happening, why it is wrong, and what are the risks for the company. The ...


3

The problem with selecting the rescue instead of the warning is that you have already discussed the case with at least one other person. This means that it is highly likely that your co-workers will find out that you deliberately allowed your company to ship a bad product. Even if your Machiavellian maneuvering remains undiscovered, that friend who suggested ...


14

It's unethical. In the companies I worked damage prevention was highly valued "oh that would have been very expensive, if we wouldn't have catched this now". And the fact that you reviewed all the specs again and found that issue in the first place , would make you a very valuable employee. But If I would ever find out that you hid that to make you look ...


2

Therefore to him that knoweth to do good, and doeth it not, to him it is sin.-James 4:17 This is not to make a theological point, but it summarises a principle in many people's sense of ethics. Making mistakes is not wrong. Voluntarily standing by and letting something bad happen which you have the ability to prevent, is wrong. Yes, if you can position ...


6

Two things you said in your question: the guy who wrote the problematic code is my opponent for the promotion You view your co-workers as opponents? Does he view you as an opponent? Do you honestly believe that they only have budget to promote one of you? And this: A big con I see about revealing this beforehand is that damage prevented is not as ...


0

Ask to schedule a meeting with your boss about feedback. Get him to write down a specific time before you leave the room, and if he doesn’t, email him repeatedly until he does schedule a time (though obviously don’t spam his inbox). In that meeting, tell him exactly what you told us. Ask him if he’d be willing to talk with the senior engineer, since you ...


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1 The lead developer (not my boss) openly subscribes to the thinking that a lack of documentation is a form of job security. As a result, nothing is written down. 2 The manager (my boss, who is technical) is seemingly unmotivated and uninterested in the work. He takes every Friday off and spends the rest of the time in his office. When I have asked ...


2

What is the best way to have a strong market value to jump 8 months to one year from now? Given the information, your best outcome is a good reference and whatever you manage to educate yourself with. Both of which are quite valuable assets. Don't expect too much when you first join the workforce.


2

I'd recommend taking a look at Mechatronics Engineering. It's a multidisciplinary Engineering field that combines Computer, Control, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and is highly sought after as far as multidisciplinary Engineering goes. Especially in Digital Engineering fields, there are numerous fields you can get into. These Engineers work with ...


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The skills you're trying to obtain are highly sought after in the Embedded and Wearable device fields. My undergraduate degree is in Computer Science, but I'm old enough to have learned about computers when a firm grasp on electronics was required. Today I work on industrial control systems doing embedded Linux development. A fair part of my work requires ...


2

I am taking more credits in both software and hardware, but would that help if I want to have a job in both areas? Of course it would, if nothing else it will give you actual knowledge in the fields.


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Do you do any Python scripting in your current job? If not, start doing so. There is always something that can be automated. My current project has 16,500+ compiler warnings (!). On my first day, I spent 15 minutes to knock up a script to ignore the not so serious warnings (variable declared, but no used, etc), so that we could see the important ones. ...


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