New answers tagged

3

Look for fullstack jobs, as you actually did full stack. Those are jobs that value breadth over depth. Also the value people learning enough of a technology in a short time to get it going. Otherwise, mentiond you have a broad horizon, but adapt to the job you want. E.g: if you apply for a backend job, give that more space on your cv and stress all the ...


0

The closest I would get to mentioning issues in an interview is to highlight you played the game though enough to have thought about their design decisions. Maybe from there you could lightly tread on things you would like to be different. Those comments need to be carefully wrapped in positive energy. You want to communicate that you'd be excited to ...


5

Most of the other answers are far too negative, this is a great idea but it needs to be done properly. It would be easy to come across as "you guys are a bunch of bozos and I could do a better job", you want to show empathy and interest. So you say something like "I downloaded the demo of XYZ it's great I really enjoyed using it especially ABC,...


6

I think this is a good idea. It's definitely an unorthodox approach. Personally I would wait for him to describe the company and their current product. So if the conversation was like this: .... Interviewer (I): "Did you do any research into our company or what we do?" You: "Yes, I notice that you currently have a game called X available on Y. ...


2

For the most part I agree with all the other feedback that you want to leave a positive feeling from an interview, so giving criticism is risky at best. Additionally the interviewer probably isn't even the right person to share such things with, so it wouldn't even work if they're open to it. BUT, an alternative which I could see working is that if they are ...


48

Assume they already know about all the bugs you found. Their app is in Beta. They have QA testers. They know about the bugs, and probably more that you haven't found. They shouldn't be using candidate interviews as a means of testing their own app, and it's highly likely they are not. So if you do decide to bring up a bug, do so with this in mind. Remember ...


59

If you are applying to a QA-type role, then there is a lot of value to pointing out bugs in a beta. You instantly demonstrate your keen eye for detail and you can show your style of bug reports. Feel free to show off what you see as flaws to the game, but bring your justifications. However, if you’re applying for a developer role, slow down. Developers ...


27

I worked in video games for several years. I recall getting the first build, playing it, and immediately speaking with my technical lead about some things I perceived as bugs. This wasn't pre-interview; it was in the first week of my being on-staff. My lead was totally open to the conversation, but not everything was accepted as a real bug. I would say that ...


13

If you want the job, you should focus on making the other person feel great about hiring you so bringing up bugs on your own is treading very thin ice. If you get asked, how would your skill set help this team/game/company, then you can bring it up; but don't call it bug or obvious design error. Bring up your ability to finish stuff that's currently in alpha/...


155

I can tell you that such an approach would be very brave, and by brave I mean it in the sense that running into the woods to fight a bear with no weapons or protection would be brave, and would net similar results. If you went on an interview for a Chef's position, you wouldn't want to walk in the door and tell them everything wrong with their menu, which is ...


4

I'm going to buck the trend here. I'm a big fan of locus of control and not blaming external factors. You're blaming the devs. A lot of answers here are blaming the work environment - which isn't wrong, but it's possibly a bit misplaced since the OP isn't a manager but is the recruiter - who can't change that environment. So instead, here's my answer. You, ...


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