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It is troubling that a manager would ask a future employee to work before their start date. While I understand that a good start with the new employer is desired, it seems that a polite, but firm "No" is in order. An email reply something like the following is appropriate: Dear [future boss]: While it is flattering that you think enough of me to ...


23

What would be the best way to reply to the new company that I'd prefer to honor the 2 weeks my current company is requesting of me? Something like this: "I understand that you'd like me to start as soon as possible and I would too. However I feel that I'm professionally bound to honor the two week notice period that my current company is requesting and ...


19

My experience in the software industry is that companies almost always want you to start right away and they almost never actually need you to. I've given myself short gaps between jobs every single time and it's never been a problem. On the hiring side, I've never noticed a problem if a candidate needs an extra week or two. Unless the recruiter has ...


14

In case your friend has already given his or her notice, but is leaving on good terms, it might be worth mentioning this to the previous / current boss. In the worst case, if the new boss makes more unreasonable demands (and asking you to do work for them when they should fully know that you are still in full-time employment by another company), it might not ...


13

Is 2 months acceptable, or too long? It depends solely on the employer, and on the potential employee. In some situations I have hired really good folks and have been willing to wait a few months. But in other cases, I need to fill a vacancy quickly, and 2 months would not be acceptable. Do I increase my chances by saying "immediately"? Probably, but ...


12

Small gaps in resumes don't matter nearly as much as people think. It only becomes a problem if the gap is so long that people question whether your skills are still current. As for your immediate question, in my opinion, working for 2 weeks then quitting is much worse than backing out immediately. In those two weeks the company will have put in ...


12

When a boss asks "can you start in five days" he does not mean "is it theoretically possible that, if everything goes well, you will be ready to start in five days". He means "Are you reasonably sure you will be ready to start in five days, whatever goes wrong.". This is true of all time estimates, and not realizing this is responsible for a lot of over-...


12

You don't say what country you're in; that will have a bearing on it. You should tell the company that you'll sign the contract and any other items on your first day of work, but you need a copy now in order for your attorney to review them. If the company is professional, there won't be any problem with that - but if they balk, I would carry on with the ...


12

technically I'd be working one day for free Don't make assumptions like this. Ask them. I'm unsure how these things normally work The norm is you get paid for the time you work.


11

I think anytime a company pushes back an established start date (and especially one they didn't even bother to tell you about) it is a big red flag. I would have continued my search from the first delay. I can't think of any reason to push back a start date that was agreed on (and I certainly would not quit my current job without a start date) that doesn't ...


11

At this point it's just a job offer you can still negotiate starting day, you haven't actually accepted the offer. That's understandable and does happen, although they might not like it. You need to let them know as soon as possible that you're excited to have the offer, but taking the job is contingent on you being able to fulfill preplanned obligations. ...


11

Since I have an offer, I cannot look for work. For me this has never been a true statement. I have continued to apply for jobs up to the starting date because there was always a small chance that the job will disappear. The fact you are waiting on the drug and background check means the job isn't 100% guaranteed. But even if there were no contingencies ...


10

In general, employers are well aware that notice periods are pretty much universal and therefore don't expect that people they hire will be available to start tomorrow. Whether or not a month's notice is going to be acceptable to a particular employer isn't something we can tell you, but it's not a ridiculous length of time, particularly for a professional ...


10

As a manager, it can be difficult to keep a job posting open for a candidate who isn't going to be available for several months. A lot can happen - you might accept another job, the manager might lose the budget for the position, and so on. It sounds like the manager is proposing to hire you now then grant unpaid leave for you to take your 6 - 8 week ...


10

It sounds like the problem is you want to travel but don't want your new company to know you're travelling, because then they might want you to work earlier. I would be upfront, telling them, "I thought the earliest month I could leave my company X, but since we talked it turns out I can leave in month X-2. Ideally, I'd like to have those two months to ...


9

Suppose I interview well and manage to get an offer in the same week as I begin training my replacement. Would I be unreasonable in proposing a start date a month out? A month out will almost certainly not be a problem. It would be very reasonable to propose that sort of delay in starting if it is needed. In my experience, managers hiring folks who ...


9

In terms of next steps: Stop going in voluntarily. They have 0 motivation to give you a contract and "start date" when you're already working for free. Call your contact at the company and inform them of this. Use whatever reasoning sounds good to you. Continue your job search. Inform prospective employers that you are in process with another company but ...


7

Assuming you started on the 2nd of January, you should have the full holiday for the year. I am not a lawyer, ofc, but I have experienced this scenario myself and done some research. They are allowed to take holidays off if you start later in the year - however, only in proportion to how much later you've started. So assuming you start half a year in, you ...


6

If the contract specifies a start date then, as Jane S comments, you should talk to a lawyer. You should probably to talk to a lawyer anyway, since you will need to make sure that your husband can just walk out of the contract (even if work hasn't started - there is a contract, and you need to make sure that it is already breached and void before taking ...


6

A couple ideas. 1) Any old resume's. Do you have any old resume's around from last time you were job hunting? Even old hard copies would have the dates you used then. 2) Any job boards you might have used in the past? Even if you can't remember your account info and can't reset your password you may still be able to view the info. 3) Old tax info or pay ...


6

Let me put this to you plainly. If I hired you and wanted you to start as soon as possible and you said you had to give notice and this was the first available date. That is fine if I agreed to it. If I find out later you actually took a holiday instead of working the notice you told me of, the offer would instantly be withdrawn because you are lying to me. ...


6

Your contract is King here. What your manager desires[1] has nothing to do with what your contract says. So the next step is to review your contract in the smallest detail and determine if there is any section that requires you to stay longer. You made need to involve a legal specialist from your locale to help you do this. Once you are certain of your ...


6

Usually in the UK according to the contract, you would have a probationary period and every place I've worked at has rules about this probationary period, one of which is no sick pay during such period. Now if your contract doesn't state such and neither do their policies, then your start date should be what it was and you should have your pay as stated in ...


5

If there is a legal contract stating you started on a certain date, then they should pay you for the time that their delay caused them to be out of work. Of course, to force them to do this would require a lawyer if they didn't comply, and the lawyer fees may be more than the amount you'd be paid. In short, always have money saved in some kind of emergency ...


5

It depends…. If the work is to review the job specs of people that are about to be hired to will report to her once she start her job, then she should do it. If the work is to review a spec for a system that the team she is joining will be creating, maybe it is worth doing so as to have input. If it is normal day to day work, then just say no.


5

If the interview process doesn't put your current job or bonus at risk and you are genuinely interested in this new position, you should proceed. This is a point of negotiation when you are trying to reach terms of employment. While it is very unusual in the US for a 3 month delay in start date, it is not unusual in other places. Also, some companies have ...


5

Let me give you a dose of reality. At some point you're going to get a job offer (with whatever you put on your resume) because statistically, it's bound to happen. And and some point, one of those jobs is going to do a (drumroll please) ... BACKGROUND CHECK When that day comes, you need to have that information, period. They will pay a company to look ...


5

Holiday is regulated by the Bundesurlaubsgesetz in Germany. It explains how many minimum days there are, and how the days you are owed are calculated. The following parts are relevant. All translations and emphases are mine. § 3 Dauer des Urlaubs (1) Der Urlaub beträgt jährlich mindestens 24 Werktage. (2) Als Werktage gelten alle Kalendertage, die ...


5

In my opinion, there's no easy way you can keep the both options open without burning some bridges and / or earning some bad reputation. Given that you have accepted the offer with a predefined joining date, then you continued interviewing with other organizations and now you want to postpone the joining because you expected you may have a better offer from ...


4

I have never heard of a company delaying the start date by 3 months - if they're hiring it's because they need to fill a position now. The only possible exception has been in the case of students who are still in school. It's completely unreasonable for you to ask, and I don't think you will get the job if you do mention it.


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