164

It is troubling that a manager would ask a future employee to work before their start date. While I understand that a good start with the new employer is desired, it seems that a polite, but firm "No" is in order. An email reply something like the following is appropriate: Dear [future boss]: While it is flattering that you think enough of me to ...


79

My current employer asked if I'd like them to reconsider my current salary It means your current employer values you significantly – it takes significant time to train new employees and allow them to settle in the team/workplace. Assuming you didn't burn any bridges when you turned them down earlier, the smart thing to do here would be to save your own ...


29

You gave a months notice. That doesn't mean you are out of a job in a months time. It means you go to your manager asap and ask if you can cancel the notice. Obviously the timing is really bad, but the chances are not bad. If I was your old employer, and slightly hard nosed but not too bad, I might offer to cancel your notice, same salary, if you sign a ...


23

What would be the best way to reply to the new company that I'd prefer to honor the 2 weeks my current company is requesting of me? Something like this: "I understand that you'd like me to start as soon as possible and I would too. However I feel that I'm professionally bound to honor the two week notice period that my current company is requesting and ...


22

They said that they want to push the start date by 2 or 3 months. They didn't give a definite date. This is untenable, stay with your current employment if possible. My current employer asked if I'd like them to reconsider my current salary. I said no to this, because the reason for quitting was not so much salary as the nature of my work. Reconsider ...


19

My experience in the software industry is that companies almost always want you to start right away and they almost never actually need you to. I've given myself short gaps between jobs every single time and it's never been a problem. On the hiring side, I've never noticed a problem if a candidate needs an extra week or two. Unless the recruiter has ...


16

You don't say what country you're in; that will have a bearing on it. You should tell the company that you'll sign the contract and any other items on your first day of work, but you need a copy now in order for your attorney to review them. If the company is professional, there won't be any problem with that - but if they balk, I would carry on with the ...


14

In case your friend has already given his or her notice, but is leaving on good terms, it might be worth mentioning this to the previous / current boss. In the worst case, if the new boss makes more unreasonable demands (and asking you to do work for them when they should fully know that you are still in full-time employment by another company), it might not ...


13

Is 2 months acceptable, or too long? It depends solely on the employer, and on the potential employee. In some situations I have hired really good folks and have been willing to wait a few months. But in other cases, I need to fill a vacancy quickly, and 2 months would not be acceptable. Do I increase my chances by saying "immediately"? Probably, but ...


12

Small gaps in resumes don't matter nearly as much as people think. It only becomes a problem if the gap is so long that people question whether your skills are still current. As for your immediate question, in my opinion, working for 2 weeks then quitting is much worse than backing out immediately. In those two weeks the company will have put in ...


12

When a boss asks "can you start in five days" he does not mean "is it theoretically possible that, if everything goes well, you will be ready to start in five days". He means "Are you reasonably sure you will be ready to start in five days, whatever goes wrong.". This is true of all time estimates, and not realizing this is responsible for a lot of over-...


12

technically I'd be working one day for free Don't make assumptions like this. Ask them. I'm unsure how these things normally work The norm is you get paid for the time you work.


11

I think anytime a company pushes back an established start date (and especially one they didn't even bother to tell you about) it is a big red flag. I would have continued my search from the first delay. I can't think of any reason to push back a start date that was agreed on (and I certainly would not quit my current job without a start date) that doesn't ...


11

At this point it's just a job offer you can still negotiate starting day, you haven't actually accepted the offer. That's understandable and does happen, although they might not like it. You need to let them know as soon as possible that you're excited to have the offer, but taking the job is contingent on you being able to fulfill preplanned obligations. ...


11

Since I have an offer, I cannot look for work. For me this has never been a true statement. I have continued to apply for jobs up to the starting date because there was always a small chance that the job will disappear. The fact you are waiting on the drug and background check means the job isn't 100% guaranteed. But even if there were no contingencies ...


10

In general, employers are well aware that notice periods are pretty much universal and therefore don't expect that people they hire will be available to start tomorrow. Whether or not a month's notice is going to be acceptable to a particular employer isn't something we can tell you, but it's not a ridiculous length of time, particularly for a professional ...


10

As a manager, it can be difficult to keep a job posting open for a candidate who isn't going to be available for several months. A lot can happen - you might accept another job, the manager might lose the budget for the position, and so on. It sounds like the manager is proposing to hire you now then grant unpaid leave for you to take your 6 - 8 week ...


10

It sounds like the problem is you want to travel but don't want your new company to know you're travelling, because then they might want you to work earlier. I would be upfront, telling them, "I thought the earliest month I could leave my company X, but since we talked it turns out I can leave in month X-2. Ideally, I'd like to have those two months to ...


9

Suppose I interview well and manage to get an offer in the same week as I begin training my replacement. Would I be unreasonable in proposing a start date a month out? A month out will almost certainly not be a problem. It would be very reasonable to propose that sort of delay in starting if it is needed. In my experience, managers hiring folks who ...


9

In terms of next steps: Stop going in voluntarily. They have 0 motivation to give you a contract and "start date" when you're already working for free. Call your contact at the company and inform them of this. Use whatever reasoning sounds good to you. Continue your job search. Inform prospective employers that you are in process with another company but ...


8

In addition to the other answers, you can just talk to your current employer about extending your notice period, even if you still intend on leaving. They might be happy to do so, because, especially in these chaotic times, they'll have more time to find a replacement for you. Many people hesitate to switch jobs at the moment, so new employees are harder to ...


7

Assuming you started on the 2nd of January, you should have the full holiday for the year. I am not a lawyer, ofc, but I have experienced this scenario myself and done some research. They are allowed to take holidays off if you start later in the year - however, only in proportion to how much later you've started. So assuming you start half a year in, you ...


7

You might be out of luck because you voluntarily quit your prior job, but the person you should be asking is the unemployment office for your area. Anyone on here is just giving an educated guess.


6

If the contract specifies a start date then, as Jane S comments, you should talk to a lawyer. You should probably to talk to a lawyer anyway, since you will need to make sure that your husband can just walk out of the contract (even if work hasn't started - there is a contract, and you need to make sure that it is already breached and void before taking ...


6

First and foremost, if they won't give you a copy of the contract to be signed I would move on -- you have to be able to review it prior to turning in your notice. ( offer letter ?? ) If they give you a copy to review in advance, then I don't think this is really a big deal to wait until the day you start to sign it. In the companies mind, I am sure its ...


6

A couple ideas. 1) Any old resume's. Do you have any old resume's around from last time you were job hunting? Even old hard copies would have the dates you used then. 2) Any job boards you might have used in the past? Even if you can't remember your account info and can't reset your password you may still be able to view the info. 3) Old tax info or pay ...


6

Let me put this to you plainly. If I hired you and wanted you to start as soon as possible and you said you had to give notice and this was the first available date. That is fine if I agreed to it. If I find out later you actually took a holiday instead of working the notice you told me of, the offer would instantly be withdrawn because you are lying to me. ...


6

Your contract is King here. What your manager desires[1] has nothing to do with what your contract says. So the next step is to review your contract in the smallest detail and determine if there is any section that requires you to stay longer. You made need to involve a legal specialist from your locale to help you do this. Once you are certain of your ...


6

Usually in the UK according to the contract, you would have a probationary period and every place I've worked at has rules about this probationary period, one of which is no sick pay during such period. Now if your contract doesn't state such and neither do their policies, then your start date should be what it was and you should have your pay as stated in ...


6

Am I eligible for unemployment? Can I file a claim? Can someone offer their guidance with my situation? Call your state's unemployment office. Only they can determine your eligibility.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible