Hot answers tagged

273

The short answer: "Because I do not supervise them." If they don't report to you, you don't control their work or assignments, and shouldn't have to stay late due to whatever is going on, whether too much work or too little skill. If you are working 60+ hours a week and it still isn't "enough" - then you're at the wrong company. Neither you nor anyone ...


239

Is there something we could do? Having your wife report to you directly and sit in the same office (regardless of the size) is highly irregular in my experience and, sadly for you, a legit spot for HR to be concerned. I have worked with my wife in the past, but she was in a separate department and had a separate reporting structure. Also, my current boss'...


226

Am I doing anything wrong? Yes. You are working 66-hour weeks and taking part in a culture that promotes even longer hours. You are considering going even further into dogmatic presenteeism in which it is a good thing to be in the office even if there is nothing to do. You will not improve morale by staying late twiddling your thumbs. You will not improve ...


220

Right now, you're being used, and the CEO is feeding you vague promises to convince you to let yourself keep being used. Demand appropriate guarantees. If you can't get them, walk. If you had significant equity in the company, this would be fine, and even normal, but you don't, so it's not. Sure, the CEO might decide to up your pay once VC funding comes ...


210

Keep in mind if you don't offer at least a 2% raise, you're actually paying him less due to inflation. Are they doing less valuable work now than they were 12 months ago? Plus, a programmer early in their career quickly becomes more valuable, so their worth increases more quickly. Don't think about this in a moral sense (i.e., does this person "deserve" ...


193

Lord forgive me, but I am actually on HR's side this time. Your arrangement is an HR office's worst nightmare.... Nepotism Fraternization Liability for lawsuits... Having a spouse be a direct report to her manager.... They are not engaging in sabotage, they are engaging in self-preservation. The myriad of lawsuits to which this makes the company ...


153

Just say yes You can point out that you expect them to be interviewing other candidates as well. You can also say that you find it unwise to stop looking elsewhere until you reach an agreement with them or at least until they give you an offer. In general believing in the startup project is good, but it's not like you are a founder or a partner and they ...


149

Just start with whatever you use for general informal communications with your boss (instant messaging, text messaging, whatever) and just say: Hi Boss. My August salary doesn't seem to have made it into my bank account yet - could you check on this? Thanks! I'd be pretty sure you'd then get a response which is either "Aaargh. Sorry. Slipped my mind. I'...


126

Find a new job, submit your two weeks notice and leave. This doesn't sound like a valuable company so your shares are almost certainly worthless. You're probably shielded by the corporate veil if this is a company in the US, but if you've signed any contracts besides an employment agreement, you might want to contact an attorney (especially if there's a non-...


119

Is it ok to accept the proposal to work from home? It sounds like the CEO trusts you, and is offering up the work from home arrangement as a token of that trust and to perhaps help with the small office accommodations. So, if you're okay with working from home, then do so; if not, let him know you prefer to come into the office. Your choice.


110

Are there any general DOs and DONTs for this kind of question? DO say "yes", because it's the truth, because it conveys the impression that you in demand, and because it creates a sense of urgency lest you be snapped up elsewhere. DO say "yes" even in the case where you haven't yet interviewed elsewhere, but since you are looking for a job you certainly ...


108

Did I do something wrong if I decide to leave the company? Of course not. You are a C-level executive in this company, not an indentured servant. You have every right to try and find a company that meets your needs both professionally and culturally. If this company isn't a good fit, you are smart to find a new one. Your boss is grasping to find a way to ...


102

But - I'm wondering, will this harm me at the company, and how can I determine that during the interview, as I'd imagine this might vary a bit between companies? I’m pretty sure it won’t harm you at your company and that this is actually nothing you should worry about. That said, while you may not want to eat the catered lunch, you should definitely eat ...


100

Take the offer for its face value and enjoy not having to listen to another traffic report. As a business owner, I changed our policies and had everyone go work from home. I made this decision after a fair amount of discussion with the team. As my staff had proven time and again that they were self starters and didn't need someone to make sure the tasks ...


86

You can't retract work done while being employed at X. Your pitched ideas, I assume under your current laws, are part of this work. That being said, talk to a lawyer. If the law says you own 100% of your invention, you can approach your boss notifying them about that. And get ready to lose your job. If the law says your employer have special rights (e.g. ...


82

am I worrying too much about the fact that I'm a 20 year old No. It's an important thing, and you should be the one to try and get ahead of the issues it may cause. My second real job had a 19 year old CTO. It's not exactly uncommon. I think that my age and lack of work experience will make workers want to quit the job after the first month or so. This ...


81

You are not the owner. You get paid a salary, and you work for that salary. If the owner wants you to work more, he needs to pay overtime. You can tell him that it will take longer. Then you come to work and work 40 hours a week, not more. 40 hours is most healthy for you, and it is most effective. You don’t do more useful work in more hours, you just get ...


78

First, wait to see what Bob does. If he gives you a hard time, take this directly to Alice and let her know what is going on. If Bob scolds you about what's going on, explain your situation and mention that you already work more than 50 hours a week, and that you can always drop back to 40 if he wants you at specified hours, as the rest of the time will ...


78

It sounds like you already used your position to give someone you're married to a position at the company she may not have gotten otherwise, and now HR wants to make sure you two are physically separated to ensure she's working properly by herself. HR is protecting the company's interests. It is very nepotistic to have a husband convince a manager to hire ...


76

A toxic environment is not going to get better, especially since owner seems to be at the center of the company's climate. When the situation is bad and you've taken steps to improve it, at some point you have to make a decision since you've done what was in your power. If you stick with it for some reason (friendship with coworkers, etc) you have to accept ...


75

While probably not what you want to hear, when one has a unique aversive objection to something that is a widespread social norm within an industry and cannot realistically be argued to be harmful, the best solution may be trying to mitigate the sensitivity, rather than to change other's behavior. Of course what is considered a norm and what is offensive is ...


71

You're essentially down to the same path that anyone who wants to learn something in their free time. If there are no internal experts look for them elsewhere. The following are the best resources Seminars, Conferences, Courses, Online articles, Since it is a pretty new technology, you might consider the scientific publication in that field. You could ...


70

You don't know how your opinion will be portrayed. So, you are right so far, do not pass a direct judgement / opinion. Instead, stick to the facts, instead of talking about someone in particular (finger-pointing), talk about problems and possible ways of improvement. If you're asked whether you want her to be replaced, you can take the following approach to ...


69

You have dealt with it in the correct way. Assuming that the interview did indeed go along as well as you believe it did, only to change on that particular issue, then my conclusion is: The company expects people to work weekends. This appears to be non-negotiable and part of their culture. (sounds like a startup - perhaps you can confirm) You can't commit ...


67

You've been had. You've been working in a highly qualified position for less than minimum wage. Cut your losses and find a decent job that pays a decent wage. If you ever consider working for a startup, you may accept a slightly below market salary for immediate equity. But not below minimum wage with no guarantees whatsoever.


67

I hate to say it, but at this point it sounds like you're less of a founder/owner and more of a mid/upper manager. You have lost/given/sold 98% of the equity. You really don't have a lot of say in this. Don't mean to be rude, but at this point, if the CEO says to do something, do it. Or leave. I don't see other any other options.


60

It doesn't sound like this situation is salvageable, so I think leaving the company is your best option. However, it's clear that you still care about the future of the company and would prefer not to cause harm when you leave, so simply dropping a two weeks notice and disappearing isn't the best option. This is one of the very few resignation situations ...


57

The problem is that different people work better in different environments. What you should do is have plenty of private spaces and a few usable public spaces for groups. Your spaces will not effectively work at 15 people; try to design spaces for 6 or fewer. I’ve worked in cubicles, a private office, a shared office, and a open area. I disliked the open ...


55

On the one hand, I don't want to give him a raise in his salary, just because 12 months have passed. On the other hand, I don't want to simply say "no", because this might make him feel bad, and he has done really good work. From your employee's point of view I doubt he is viewing this request for a raise as being simply "because 12 months have passed" but ...


51

Give them a raise. They have become better at their job over those 12 months. Not everyone will have achievements they can list due to the nature of their work, but ultimately, they have become more valuable to your firm by absorbing more information and obtaining new skills, improving existing skills. If you decide not to give them a raise, remember that ...


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