Hot answers tagged

108

There is only one way to mitigate the "under-sleep" problem: allow your employees to have a healthy life, and to separate the job life from the private life. Other than that, you need somebody who understands management to deal with the things. Based on the work needed, they will estimate the resources required: how many people, their required ...


71

Among software engineers, there seems to be a sentiment that ideas aren't worth anything without the skills to bring them into reality, and thus that technical founders bring the most important skillset. People that think that are wrong: there is no point building a product unless there's a market for it. You can make what is technically a wonderful, ...


43

Is leaving a company after 1 month ok? Depends on the circumstances but in this case the answer is yes. There appears to be a cultural disconnect and these are very hard to fix. That's what probation is for: you can try it on for size and if it's not a fit there is a relatively easy way out. It also means that you did NOT do your homework when interviewing. ...


35

You can't. You didn't quite phrase the manager's fear right: Now if I were a hiring manager, I would (perhaps) be impressed but also very worried: if this guy maintains such big and important software, how is he going to have the time to come work here? That's not the fear. Let me alter it a bit for you: Now, if I were a hiring manager, I would be ...


29

Ask. Ask about the history of the startup, what are the goals, who had the initial idea, and what the business plans are for developing the company. There must be something in there to get this thing off the ground.


24

I work in small startup company, during the sprints we have very stressful atmosphere, caused by short deadlines and underslept personnel. How can I handle or at least mitigate this situation as a manager ? You need to either better manage expectations of stakeholders, and thus reduce the workload that goes onto the team (by removing features, cutting ...


23

Do not allow people to work for more than 40 hours a week. Various studies have shown that people simply can not work efficiently for more than 40 hours a week over longer stretches of time. Overstraining this stress level results in lack of concentration which reduces the work output and increases the amount of mistakes made. The result is that the weekly ...


18

Because it depends on who takes the risk. Here's a simple illustration on this. Situation 1. Alice the Business Savvy Guru and Bob the Tech Savant are friends and decide to try launching an idea they had, with each of them chipping in 10k and owning half the company. Situation 2. Alice has an idea and she gets funding (self funding, friends/family, angel ...


18

As has been noted in the comments, leaving is fine. Just don't mention it on your resume. Chances are people won't even ask what you did for the month or two gap on your resume but if they do you can just say that you took some much needed time off, wanted to pursue some personal projects, whatever.


16

Your resume is your own and you can format it as you want. Perhaps it would be deceptive to write Apr 2019-present, MyGreatThing LLC, blah blah if the LLC didn't exist a year ago. But you could easily write Apr 2019-present, MyGreatThing (incorporated as LLC Apr 2020), blah blah Now you're not deceiving anyone.


16

A start-up can't hire someone before the start-up exists. You as an individual could pay someone to do work for you, ie. you pay them as a freelancer. Once you start your company, you can then offer this person a full time position at your company if you want to hire them.


13

To answer your question directly, you pay everyone 1/3 of the money available, with the distribution to be re-evaluated if someone quits working roughly as much as the others. You don’t say what country you’re in, but for the purposes of the rest of this answer I’ll assume that you’re in the US or Canada, since your amounts are given in dollars. You have two ...


13

When starting a new job you get probation time. This is mutual! At least in my country during probation (usually three month) both parties can terminate the employment agreement within one weeks notice (or even sooner if both agree). Think of it not only as time where the company can evaluate you, but also the other way around! You are evaluating the ...


12

ideas aren't worth anything without the skills to bring them into reality, and thus that technical founders bring the most important skillset. This is slightly wrong. True that ideas aren't worth anything. It's the execution that counts. However, technical skills are a very small piece of the puzzle, even in a tech start-up. Most software developers can ...


11

This is a good example of the "exactly" argument. It can be found in any book on closing sales under "overcoming objections". You turn the objection into the reason why your argument is correct. "Your product is more expensive" "That's exactly why you should buy it, we are higher quality, and thus more expensive, but a ...


11

Ask for money, either by the hour or a fixed number. When they can't give you money because they have no funding yet, ask them to call you again when they secured the funding for their business venture. Most startups fail, and most which don't fail don't end up as industry giants either. So any deal which relies on them being successful (or even solvent) in ...


10

As a front end engineer with around 6 years experience, there's multiple things I can advise you on. So let me run through them: Allegiance to a company is a bad idea, unless your rank is something very high, like a CTO (and even then, your welfare comes first). There's 100 companies out there who need solid front end devs, and companies aren't your friends....


9

Then we had no choice to hire them and they unsurprisingly called quits when we refused their request for higher pay. Hiring them before discussing pay seems like the problem here, not that they are older. Hiring them before discussing work schedule seems like the problem, not that they are older. What kind of company are you where first you hire people and ...


9

Just be honest, other than maybe about the religious aspect: Thanks for the offer of an interview, and I do appreciate that you'd want to work with me again, but given the state of the world right now I'm looking for a role with a larger organisation with a bit more stability. Please do keep me in mind in the future though - shall we talk again in six ...


8

This is my personal opinion having been on both sides of performance reviews. I don't know your workplace's culture or your employees but this is generally what I find leads to better results. I appreciate it might be difficult in a start-up; there is always the temptation to be ruthless and cull people, but IMO if you do this you'll end up burning through ...


8

I think there is a few relevant things which distinguish a startup from a large (established) company in this regard. First, at a large company, the employees are much less passionate[*] about the place - they know that the company was around before they joined, and they know that the company will be there after they have moved on, and that the company is ...


8

Should I carry on, act as a single-fighter developer? Or there might be something else I need to do? You need to gather with your friends and have a good talk about the future of this project and the commitment they are willing to take. Together each one of you can decide if they are still able to commit to the project, and decide accordingly. Do this, so ...


8

Treat it like working on some kind of classified research. Explain your duties, skip over the details or purpose of it, and if anyone asks tell them you're on an NDA and can't discuss the specifics of what you did. It shouldn't be that weird that you're not allowed to talk about some secret project you worked on. Just because you're on an NDA to yourself (...


7

Nothing There's no "free money truck" that comes around for acquisitions or IPOs. The way people get compensated during an exit are: Any equity shares you have vested (and exercised, if they're options) may be either cashed out or transformed into shares of the new company. You may be offered a bonus of some mix of your unvested equity and new stock in the ...


7

I agree with the others that a failed venture is generally not looked at negatively, but there is one more important aspect that I feel needs to be said. You mentioned that if you feel the project isn't going anywhere after a year you may look for other work. In an interview, you will need to be able to show what you worked on, and explain what you did for ...


7

I do not find any negative aspect of being an entrepreneur in the past. That been said: You don't know who is going to be your future employer and you can always find an employer who thinks it is negative. There are some positions that are a better fit for a non-ambitious person. You probably do not want to join a company in either of those cases.


7

As presented you appear to be overly paranoid. You can ask to be taken off it, either fully, or to only work on it part time instead of full time; how well that will go will depend on company culture and your relationship with your boss. As long as they're paying the bills to do so, companies often do keep secondary projects running long term. This is ...


7

we had few older developers stubbornly "get through" even though we explicitly made clear that work schedule, salary and risks will be stressful and unsatisfying for their demographic. Then we had no choice to hire them and they unsurprisingly called quits when we refused their request for higher pay. What this sounds like to me is you are ...


6

Why not just ask him? Compose an email with all your actual questions. If there's something you've tried to solve the problem or learn about it yourself, include that. A senior is there to mentor junior developers as well as take on their backlog. It's terrific that you want to respect his time, and if you come prepared with questions, ready to learn he's ...


6

Everyone I talked to about it really likes the whole concept but most skilled people are busy with their full time jobs. Are you sure they like the idea? I'm very busy with my full time job but if I genuinely thought it was going to be a success I'd make time. Maybe ask someone who isn't your friend to get a more honest opinion. There are entrepreneur ...


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