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I am a college student graduating in June, and I was fortunate enough to sign a new grad software engineering full-time offer back in September with a medium-sized startup. "fortunate" is not what I would call it. Now that the company is being acquired, that offer is not worth the paper it was written on. You need an actual written contract, not an ...


9

My main concern is that a lot of the factors I initially had for joining (financial upside, career growth trajectory, culture, etc.) are now up in the air, and I am not sure what's the best way to get accurate answers for these questions. When you get to the meeting, and get chance to, just politely ask about those things. Ask that you previously were told ...


3

Sounds like it's time for an Engineer Appreciation Day! Do you have paid time off that you can take advantage of soon? Take a day or two off, and make yourself unavailable by phone / email. Appoint whoever knows the most about your responsibilities as a backup, but make it clear to them ahead of time what's going on. Your organization needs to understand ...


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You ask: Should I be satisfied with [...] We can't answer that question. The best advice (that worked for me in life) is to figure out what you want to achieve. Do you want more money? That is not the same as getting equity, but an option Do you want more control? That is going to be challenging with 5 other co-owners Do you want more recognition for ...


0

In a sense, you're talking about equity in a similar way to how people talk about other types of compensation (salary, benefits, etc). On the surface, this might make sense - you will be rewarded for your contributions with a share of equity. However, equity isn't inherently interchangeable with compensation in general. Equity isn't money, and has no stable ...


6

I agree with the highly voted answers that basically say "this is not your problem" but I'm writing an answer to frame challenge your question, and the conclusion that there is actually a problem, because I think there's a learning opportunity present in this issue that's being glossed over. Companies make decisions about who does what work based on a ...


1

I do not agree with other answers this is good for you. One good argument is that there is a need for rest and holidays time. I once were in your shoes, and whilst I did not stabilized fixed the infra-structure that I "inherited", it meant holidays spending a medium of 2h-4h in the phone giving support to others, because nobody else could do it. (short ...


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Obviously, they're either not getting the concept of "bus factor" or pretending that they don't understand. I would stop trying to find ways to explain this if they didn't get it after the first time you explained it. Much better to instead frame you concerns as needing a mechanism for temporary support for key responsibilities prior to taking a vacation ...


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It's a startup, so the rules of the game are very different. Most of the time, a high risk strategy of just do it without overly planning for all eventualities is absolutely the way to go. Typically there are loads of things that can only be done by one person - there simply aren't enough resources to hire for redundancy of skills. It's the nature of the ...


2

You might teach them what bus factor means, by showing some consequences. Take three weeks of vacation, say you go hiking to the mountains and won't be able to take your mobile phone with you. For other people it is surprising, how often they have to rely on you. Maybe you will find your boss displeased by your trip and your unavailability. But then you can ...


3

First, you're not as indispensable as you think you are. Key people leave all the time, and things slow down for a while, then the people remaining figure it out. Life goes on. There are a couple things you should do, though. One is making sure you aren't the only one with access to log into key infrastructure, even if no one else actually uses that access....


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I'm going to echo a few things others have said with a different emphasis: Having a low bus factor is good for you. Having a low bus factor is bad for the company. You are taking too much responsibility for the company. You have brought the issue up to your superiors, and that is good and honorable and you've tried to make the company more robust. If ...


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I'm in agreement with most of what everybody else is saying, but something I think is missing: There's a potentially cynical side to this as well. Unless your CTO is very inexperienced, he should perfectly understand the operational risk presented by having one person responsible for so much of the tech stack. It may be that he really believes that he needs ...


2

I don't want to be the guy who never gets work done because everyone is always asking me to take over things that are their dependencies. E.g. server goes down, I'm the only one who knows how to get it back up, I have to drop whatever else I'm doing to get the server back up. I'd like it if the person who notices the server is down also has the expertise to ...


7

I think you're misreading the situation. Modern tech companies tend to appeal to the younger workforce by offering what appears to be indispensable and very important part of the organization. They do this by either making you the sole responsible person, make you appear to be the "go to" person for some subject, and offer you seemingly pricey things like ...


161

It's somebody else's problem. It is very considerate of you that you do not want to be the single point of failure for your whole organization. More people should be that thoughtful of their colleagues and that loyal to their company. But if your warnings fall on deaf ears, then you did what you could. So instead of wasting any more time and energy on ...


108

You have done the number one thing that you can do to help the company: call it to their attention and give them the chance to get in front of this. They have decided not to take any action, with the statement "don't waste your time" they're trying to forcefully end the discussion. You are basically left with some things that you can do to help the company ...


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I've explained the concept of "bus factor" to my manager (who is the CTO of the company; there is nobody above his head to go to) and to other senior people in the company, and their answer is "we need this done fast, you know how to do it, just do it and don't waste your time or company time teaching or coaching others". Does anyone have any ...


1

I had designed to help the process run smoother had not been delivered because the other founders in the startup were not on board with my idea. If your idea is good, and yet people disagree with you, then the fault is at least partially on you. It can be because you didn't explain it well enough, spoke a different language than the founders (not in literal ...


2

I think you've handled this quite well. The comment may simply indicate that he was unsatisfied with the overall results, and you were simply there to take the heat. It does not need to mean that the CEO is unsatisfied with your performance - he would've made that more clear if it was really an issue. Some CEO's shoot from the hip. In these individuals I ...


13

The CEO's comment seems like a non-sequitur since the issue is your authority rather than your pay. ignoring non-sequiturs is a valid response. Asking them what they mean is better in case you missed something. You could have asked them if they meant in future you should override objections from the other founders and how they suggest you get them to ...


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It's worth saying up front that I can't tell if they agreed to pay you for this work or not. If they didn't, then you were certainly not obliged to do this. However, you did offer. And the key to that is here: originally I felt bad for leaving at such an inopportune time Don't offer things because of how you feel, if you're prepared to rescind the offer ...


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I made the mistake of offering to spend my weekends throughout January to continue to help out and onboard new candidates. This does not mean you need to spend every single weekend, or full weekends helping them out. If your situation changed and you can't help as much as your initially thought you could, a reasonable person won't hold it against you. ...


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Your post suggests that your offer is to work for free. You haven't explicitly stated what the company will pay you for your weekend work. I strongly suspect you left it out here because nothing was discussed at all. Whether it would be remiss to go back on your (presumed) free work offer depends on your goal. Let's look at your options, and the possible ...


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