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109

Companies don't hire skills. They hire people. The phone interview is a chance to see the person behind the skillset, and see what your experiences have been. Maybe you weren't what they were looking for, and that's fine. However, you made a mistake by unfriending him on LinkedIn. You just burned that bridge and guaranteed you won't get another interview. ...


94

Write them up an email to express you still desire the position. The best case is they bring you in for a interview. Worse case is they'll tell you to leave them alone. I recall once I had a interview at this place and I thought the phone interview went great. They sent me a email saying they found someone else. I then noticed they reopened the same post so ...


64

You got rejected, and then you assumed the worst. Here's a possibility: You had a phone interview, which went well, but there were more phone interviews. One of those people got interviewed, turned out to be absolutely brilliant, an offer was made and provisionally accepted, so they sent rejection letters to everyone else including you to avoid stringing ...


40

I am not a lawyer. I would recommend you to get one to make sure you don't make any legal concessions you don't have to make. But if I would be in a situation where hiring a lawyer is not possible, I would only write the undeniable truth, and nothing more: I confirm having received this document and sign it with the current date. This proves that they ...


23

You should react by moving on and continuing your job search. You'll apply to many jobs that you think you're a perfect fit for and get no response or rejection; don't take it personally. Just because it was a "positive phone interview" from your perspective doesn't mean they were impressed with your qualifications. It would be unprofessional for an ...


23

I am going to point out that many people who did not do well at the interview think they did brilliantly. Just because you have all the technical skills doesn't mean they think you will fit in. Technical is typically only 30-50% of what they are looking for. And I personally have interviewed plenty of people who thought they had the technical skills but ...


14

Its obvious that you don't want this letter to be up from your tone and comments. Before we go into legal hashmash (which is off topic here), lets explore some other options to get what you want (the letter removed). Your first step would be to contact the company that put the letter up, if you can see who did it. Outline your concerns to them and ...


13

There are already several great answers, illustrating that there are many different reasons more plausible than some bizarre desire to mess with a person completely unknown to them. To add a few more possibilities: They did hire someone, but renewed the offer because they realized they need more people. The position is an open vacancy, meaning that it will ...


13

Of course it's fishy. You may have legal rights against unfair dismissal. You may have contractual rights of appeal under the terms of your contract or the company's documented dismissal policy. By accepting the termination, you may weaken any claim for unfair dismissal. As others have said, take the paper, acknowledge that you have received it, and ...


12

There's a moonlightning clause in my contract. I'm obliged to disclose If I'm working on anything else. Does that include vacation? Yes it does. It doesn't matter when you are working on something else. It only matters that you are. If you plan to work elsewhere during your vacation, your moonlighting clause requires you to disclose that fact.


12

Ok this might sound like I'm quite disdainful of recruiters, but they work in a very competitive, results-led industry, and based on my dealings with them over the past 15+ years in software development I would offer this advice: Unless you are actively seeking a new role (or perhaps somewhat open to opportunities), ignore contact from recruiters unless you ...


12

Gender, nationality, age (actually birth date) and even a photo are all standard content of a traditional Swiss CV [1] and asking for this information is perfectly legal. US anti-discrimination legislation as discussed in some comments is not relevant when applying in other countries. Inform yourself about employment laws and customs of the country you want ...


11

I just noticed this: "I deeply regret that this step was needed". Do not write this. Remember: Anything you say or write can and will be used against you. You just admitted that not only your company was right to fire you, but that your bad behaviour made it necessary to fire you. At least that's what any lawyer will say. Why would you write this? To be ...


10

The way you should react is by re-appraising your suitability for the role and how you presented in the phone interview. Your assumption that you are perfect for the job and yet didn't get it is a major warning sign for you to take heed of. The fact is you did something wrong, or did not do something right, or you would have the job. And yet you thought ...


9

When someone makes you an offer there will be a time limit. If you do not respond within that time limit, it will be considered a refusal. If you do not intend to accept an offer, refuse it politely. If your Swiss job falls through, you can always go back to them and say, "A visa problem prevented another opportunity from working out, so I am interested in ...


8

You're in a tough spot that I don't know how you can get yourself out of. You broke the cardinal rule of job hunting. You lied. It's one thing to lead someone to draw conclusions that aren't entirely accurate. It's one thing to accentuate the positive while minimizing the negative. But that's not what you did. You told them that you could do something ...


7

In Switzerland the questions aren't exactly illegal (you can't prove they've been asked), but you're allowed to lie in the answer. The specific topics you're allowed to lie about, if asked: Pregnancy (possibly except in occupations that simply don't work during pregnancy, my information is unclear) Religion (except where relevant, e.g. if you apply for a ...


7

When you are being terminated, there is absolutely no reason to sign anything unless there's an incentive. If they're saying "Here, we'll pay you an extra month of severance if you sign this," and I've been there before, then you need to balance the sure thing of a month of money vs the ambiguous relief of trying to address wrongful termination. But if ...


5

In addition to the Answer provided by @l0b0 I would also add two more possible reasons for the relisted job: (1) Some managers use a practice that in HR circles is called "sandbagging". These managers plan to hire in the future but do not currently have the authorization (a.k.a. budget) today, so instead they offer a vaporware style of job in order to ...


5

He was ok with me doing this but noted that this was an "exception" and that "vacation is given to rest, not for doing extra work" and raised some concerns regarding burnout. All this seemed a bit strange to me since there was an apparent benefit for my company If I carried out this 2-week course during my vacation. It also creates a potential legal ...


4

Even during your vacation time you're an employee of that company (they pay you during that time). According to your contract you're obliged to disclose work for other companies. DON'T EVEN THINK ABOUT NOT TELLING THEM! Your manager is correct, holidays are meant to ensure that employees have time to unwind. It is in the companies' interest as well as ...


4

I'm German and I don't think there will be a huge problem. Today, most employees speak English anyway (at least to a degree where you can get what they want). I work as a software developer and asked my boss once if non-German speaking employees are considered just as foreign ones are and he said: It doesen't matter that much. However, they have to be able ...


4

So, you briefly met someone and want to send them a message. I find that the key to 'random' emails is to get in the right mindset. I bet this connection is important in the company and that sense he/she is important they receive many 'random' emails a day from people. They get all these emails, but you are a step ahead because your email isn't completely ...


3

So, from my experience of serving as a CTO for a company, these are some which I think you would want to ask: What would be my roles and responsibilities? What would be my equity and the norms for vesting? What is the capital split? (while bootstrapping and if you are expected to contribute) Am I responsible for the hiring and firing of the technical and R&...


3

The question to ask anytime you are told to do something you think is not in your best interests is: So, if were to refuse to comply with your request what would the consequences be? Are you willing to document those consequences in writing? You do not always need a lawyer. If you do not like the answers then you can reply: I am not unwilling to ...


2

I can't speak to Swiss law or any legal requirements, but this kind of thing happens almost all the time in more general contractor/employer relationships. If, as the employer, you need the contractor (or new employee) to start work sooner, but the contractor can't do that as that would form a scheduling conflict, the employer will typically find someone ...


1

I am a German, working as a software engineer for a US company's subsidiary located in Cologne. Our office's working language is English and roundabout half of my colleagues do not have German roots, making it also the common ground for chit-chatting. I am not aware of many other companies in my area that have this kind of culture, but they definitely ...


1

I knew at least three foreign developers living in Berlin and working in small and mid sized IT companies. Some of them started without knowing any notion of the language, yet all took German courses at some point. I can't say for sure, but those people seem to demonstrate that it's not a problem there to find a job without initially knowing the language. ...


1

The usual ones before taking the position: What responsibilities would there be, what perks would come with the position, and anything else you'd need to know to decide whether or not you'd want that title. Some people may want details about what kind of power they could have, some may want to know about vacation time, and others may have other questions ...


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