71

Ahh, the old, "I'm the boss, but I want to be your friend" situation. I will tell you to answer your question directly without context, and then try with context. Namely, be the boss and not their friendly coworker. Tell them this is the job you have for them, and that's it. They are paid to do what you say and be done with it. But own up to your ...


60

Key point for me here: "I have received feedback from management that I am not getting noticed at my job" You probably should then ask said "management" (whoever that is) if there is anything you can to do to keep them informed of your activities. You should mention what you do, the reports you provide your lead and pretty much ask for their advice, ...


55

I agree with Viv's answer, but I think it is worth expressing why it is inappropriate. If you offered money, and your colleague accepted, one of two things would happen. He would do it as part of his work, or in addition. If he did it as part of his work, you would have paid him to change his priorities from those set by management, a conflict of interest. ...


55

how do you deal with this conflict once it has been decided that this is something that must go ahead, if you feel strongly against the change? My way of dealing with this is considering what my role in the company is. Am I there as a developer? As an analyst? As a team lead? As a project manager? If I'm the developer (which I surmise you are), then you ...


35

You don't want to stop her from asking questions, because that's how accidents happen. You said that it helps you in one way and makes you think and that's a good thing and the only problem you have is with energy. If she's getting the job done and you don't always have energy then you can just tell her that you don't have the energy. When you do have the ...


34

You've expressed your idea clearly and they decided they did not want to accept your decision and this bothers you. Well of course it bothers you. You've made an excellent case for a particular technology to be used and they flat out denied it. Though remember that politics are always at play, and you cannot understand all the underlying reasons behind ...


30

I’ve had a recurring problem with people I work with leaving things until the last minute and Deadlines for “drafts” or similar sometimes work but are often disregarded because they’re “not that important”. This is a problem which has been going on for a while. From the OP it sounds like you've tried to address it by making the deadline earlier, which ...


25

Is it normal? Yes, this is normal for a junior dev. Is it a bad job ... No, a job that gives you time to learn on the job (or in your case be on stackexchange) is a good job. They're paying you to learn and not have responsibility. But why? Speaking as a senior dev it's usually faster for me to do it than to tell a junior what I want. And if I have to ...


25

If there's one thing I've learned, it's that technicians are ignored at my peril. I would go the other way from the other answers and embrace this technician's feedback by formalizing the review process. Add a step to your process called "technician readiness review" where you solicit feedback from all your technicians (not just this one) about whether a ...


23

Your answer is in your question. It‘s perfect, because it‘s brief, it‘s precise, and it‘s not emotional at all.


19

Work in a different location. Book a meeting room if you have to. Put time on your calendar that is "do not disturb." If you have to sign out of IM, do so. Setup office hours, with the explicit purpose of being an open time for people to ask you questions. Encourage your teams to ask each other, first. Setup internal documentation (we have a team that ...


19

Well if your response to the request from your senior was actually as curt as you describe it in the question then yes, I'd say that's pretty unprofessional. It's okay to express a preference for not doing certain types of task, actually refusing isn't often wise however. You don't specify your location but certainly in many places (e.g. US, UK) your ...


18

The things that get you noticed are not generally assigned to you. You have to go looking for them. That makes it somewhat specific to your own circumstances, but some examples I've done or seen others do are: Participate in formal or informal team-building activities, like company picnics, lunches, happy hours, etc. Participate in or try to start a ...


18

It's a completely understandable reaction and a human one. You know you tried to influence the decision making process, you tried your hardest, and things didn't end up as you think they should. What I find with a lot of things is if I understand everybody wants the best outcome, it makes it easier for me. If I can work with a bunch of people who are ...


18

I once worked with a guy who would give me (and others) things to read/proofread/edit/etc. At first, I would do the chore immediately to get it off my desk. But the instant I or anyone else made a correction to the document, then we all got a revised copy of the document. It was impossible to get the chore off one's desk for more than an hour. So we all ...


18

In general, there are people who are not interested in gaining promotions, being noticed in the company or growing salary. This can be normal, they just want to get by, doing their job, like before retirement, this is not necessarily a bad thing. But the first red flag here is the performance, so this must be addressed ASAP, since it's impacting not only ...


17

If you are paid hourly, then explain that you must be paid for any work-related tasks. If you are salaried, then yes, they are asking you for unpaid overtime. You need to think about whether you want to stay in this position or begin seeking another. The people who only want to pay you for doing "actual work" are the same idiots who assume that knowledge ...


17

In my experience, it's best not to turn down a task without a good reason. This can include a lack of interest, but should be phrased in a way that you are given assurances and all concerns are addressed. For example I've got a lot of work already and don't have capacity or Although it's quiet at the moment, I don't want to get too involved with this ...


17

Working as a software developer and being diagnosed with ADHD should make me qualified to chime in on this. ADHD (with or without the hyperactivity) can create problems in a very regulated workplace - but it can be highly valuable when it comes to problem solving. Creativity and thinking outside the box can be helpful when faced with a difficult or ...


16

Good morning sir. I have already marked all of my remaining tasks as resolved. Can you please let me know what to work on next? There is absolutely nothing annoying about asking for priorities.


16

Solution is simple, have a receptionist/cashier do the work and assign the customers to stylists. This is how it's always done here for exactly the same reasons. So the customer comes in, asks for a haircut etc,. at reception, and the stylists have no say in who gets the customer. That makes it transparently fair to all. Appointments with particular ...


15

This is normal, even for senior developers new on a job. You start with bug fixes to learn about the technical ecosystem. No one's doubting your technical ability (but if you're lousy, that will show itself eventually! SMILE). It's easier to give new development to people who already know how things work in that particular company and its line of ...


15

They need someone to fix bugs. It seems that, to them, it is most economically beneficial to put experienced people on new project, and you on bug fixing. The only chance to change that assignment is to present management with business benefits of doing so. You have to think of arguments that will show why putting least experienced person on new project is ...


14

Yes. Even better than asking for more work, demonstrate some initiative. Try and think of something you could do to improve some aspect of your job/division/company then take that proposal to your boss. You know what bosses like even more than employees who get their work done? Employees who don't even have to be told what to do, because they'll create ...


14

It is definitely not OK to offer cash. If you think the other person is suitable for the task, perhaps you can arrange to swap tasks with them, through your manager or whoever assigned the task to you. If all else fails, perhaps the other person would agree to helping you out or offer some guidance with the task?


13

I have received feedback from management, that i am not getting noticed at my job. versus [my team lead] says that [...] i should not worry about visibility to the client or management. I think this is the root cause of the issue here, and it's not your fault. Your team lead clearly isn't talking to your manager about your personal development, which ...


13

I've frequently experienced this, where tasks are assigned by an offhand comment in an unrelated meeting, or a manager or team lead just walking by and saying, "Hey Meg, do when you have the bandwidth." This even happens when working on a team where issue tracking software (Jira/redmine/boards) is used for the majority of work. After several ...


12

I'm a Controls Engineer with professionally diagnosed ADHD. Having taken Adderall (2004-2007) for my ADHD, and having been un-medicated since, I can tell you that debugging/programming is much easier while on Adderall (though you do lose sleep). Things that help me in day-to-day work tasks (particularly programming) generally involve me choosing what ...


12

This is too unorganised. Why are they free to plan their weeks work if you don't trust them? You should have a report template at minimum if not a job tracking system. Then everyone knows what is expected in terms of reports and evaluation is easy. You're expecting them to become experts at writing reports and yourself at deciphering them. This is messy. ...


11

I'm reading two things in your question - a cry for help about feeling overwhelmed, and a question about tools to help organize your work better. Let's try to answer both... How should one go about doing their work, when there are far too many simultaneous and non-related ongoing tasks to do? Whenever anyone feels that they have too much on their plate,...


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