276

If you reveal it publicly (that is, everyone knows you have trained your peers) not only will you be more productive, but your whole team will be, and management will know why. By advancing the interests of the team and the company, you will be seen as someone making an important contribution. You're more likely to be promoted (for example, to team lead) or ...


202

I think that's a totally natural question to ask. It's obviously a useful piece of information for the recruiter to assess - what are the motivations of the candidate. And the candidate shouldn't be surprised to get a question like this. I was recently in the same situation. At a previous job I was a "Head of..." globally and have applied for "Software ...


158

My boss did not help things when he told Bill 'Bill, you're the guy until OP rolls his lazy butt in at 11:00', and that 'OP is really better behind a desk'. That's a huge RED FLAG: You are working the wrong issue. Your problem is the CEO, not Bill. There are clear indications that your CEO thinks that Bill is better at your job or more valuable than you ...


134

I was in this exact situation several years ago - I took it as a challenge. It made me work harder and I learnt so much from the process, and from the people who were supposedly junior to me. Being a staff/principal engineer isn't about knowing more than everyone else about a specific thing, it's about having experience, and the ability to translate the ...


120

Not only is it a question you can ask; it's one you should ask! The answer will reveal whether the candidate views it as a post-failure step-down or a happy return to core interests. Or something completely different. Sometimes people become team leads 'by accident' because they as the most experienced feel they should volunteer. When another team lead ...


105

I agree with almost all points given in Kate Gregory's answer but would suggest two minor changes: First, I would not say "make me a lot faster than the rest of the team" (even in case it's true). I would go with "increase my productivity significantly". Second, I am not the biggest fan of "lunch and learn" (even if it counts as worktime) because many ...


85

What course of action should I recommend to my manager? Discuss this with your manager first. They may have insight about the responsibilities you have. If your manager doesn't know, suggest a meeting with your immediate manager and Executive General Manager. State your concerns as: "My understanding is I was supposed to provide technical leadership on ...


82

Yes, you should ask. Of course, because you want to understand where the candidate is coming from, what his ambitions and skills are, et cetera. But keep an open mind, don't read too much in job titles. Especially terms like "lead" and "senior" can mean completely different things in different organisations. Ask what the actual responsibilities were, and ...


77

It sounds like there are many issues, a lot of which is related to communication. Daily Standups could help this. They are a tool from the agile world. Even if you are not following an agile methodology you could still find it useful. Quite simply each member of the team stands together at the start of the day and says what they worked on yesterday, what ...


72

Document the objective failings he has in his job. Don't document things that are subjective, like how you feel disrespected. He doesn't complete his assignments on time? Document it when it happens, as well as the consequences for the business. He complains that you aren't keeping him up to date on things? If you do this verbally, follow up with an ...


60

When I'm confronted about this ("so what level are you actually?"), should I... Just tell them your level and move on in the conversation. If you don't make a big deal out of your title, the chances are much lower that anyone else will. I certainly wouldn't "acknowledge myself being overhire" or claim to be awesome at negotiation. It ...


54

I am exactly in the same position as you, and my boss has asked me to become lead of my team precisely because I am new and don't have standing issues with anybody, I will probably be in a better position to defuse conflicts. I think about it as an opportunity to jump to a team leader position, which is something I wanted to do eventually. Also, this kind ...


46

Tell him the story of the car mechanic who was asked how much he charges. His answer was: “It’s $25 an hour. It’s $35 if you watch, $45 if you give advice, and $55 if you try to help. “


46

You've been supplanted: you should start looking for a new position as soon as possible. Your boss thinks Bill is better at your job than you are. And, given that you're posting here about how to deal with it, he may have a point. As a team leader/manager, one should be able to deal with one's team effectively. I'm assuming you're not in the forces where ...


40

Careful! Don't shoot yourself in the foot by talking about being overhired. It sounds like you're highly competent, just feeling a little overmatched in a new environment, which is to be expected... Your view of the team can go in a negative direction (being intimidated) or a positive direction (feeling respect). I think you should focus on the positive side....


31

The third option would be to log all technical recommendations and deficiencies by email with Manager X. This leaves them in control but holds them accountable for any shortcomings as you have evidence that these issues have been brought to their attention. This would be the role that a technical advisor would have within a project. If you are unclear as ...


28

I have been in this situation, and here would be my 2€: I'm not sure if this is the right thing for me. I'm not sure if I want to take on that responsibility "Responsibility" is a weird thing. There are some areas in life where responsibility is real - for example if you are driving a 40t vehicle through a crowded city, you better make sure your driving ...


26

What is the best way to try to stay optimistic and positive and encourage optimism and positive attitudes in others on my team? Donuts. No seriously, simple things that make people associate work with good things to help counteract the bad things is key. Little things like this can provide just enough of a jumpstart of motivation to help run down the good ...


25

If you're interested in pursuing a tech lead or a more management-focused path in your career development then it may be worth looking at even if there isn't additional compensation being offered (although I would at the very least push for the title of team lead) as it will be valuable experience. If that's not a move you are looking to make then I'd steer ...


25

I ran into this very thing, here's what I did. Note: Only do this if there is no urgency and you have the time. I sat down with the person and let them watch me fix some bugs. I let them know that some times, things that may look like major fixes or urgent are not, and I demonstrated fixing something that caused what looked like a major problem, but was ...


24

I've been on the other side of this with people being brought into our team as the Team lead or head architect who the team felt was at our same level or maybe a little lower. I would say the only thing one of them did wrong, was throwing their weight around to prove that they deserve the position. Just be a good teammate and it will work out. If there is ...


22

I spoke to our CEO about this issue, and he did not seem supportive at all. I told CEO that I felt Bill was stepping on my toes and needed to stay in his lane, both as his job description and an employee. He seemed dismissive of the whole issue "Don't let it bother you", "People will have different personalities, and you can't help that", and with advice to "...


21

Take your role literally My stated role in the project to review the work undertaken by the contracts, ensure it is technically proficient, and request changes where errors or omissions are identified. Your role is to "request changes" Have a formal report of "change request" Have an overall summary like project manager. If you think the ...


20

Either your solutions are not as great as you think they are, or you are not presenting them very well. Keep in mind, decision makers always weigh cons and pros, they do not necessarily value any intrinsic properties of a system. So any 'correct' design by comp-sci standards are meaningless, unless they can be represented in the context of: Work hours; ...


20

Put simply, "documenting stuff" happens a lot. Documentation is an important part of software development (funny link about software documentation), so it is best to learn how to do it early in your career. Furthermore, the best way to handle these kinds of projects (which from what I have seen is a common occurrence) is to pour through it and document ...


17

Does she has such right because she is senior and I am junior? Some places she does, some places she doesn't. Mostly, it doesn't matter if she has the right, all people have the option of bossing others around or organizing some chaos so stuff gets done (depending on your perspective). In general, you should shift your perspective. Not all bossy people are ...


17

This person is only trying to help, don't shoot them in the foot, all you need to say is: "I got this [name of person], thank you for your help. I'll let you know if I have any questions". If they immediately come back with more helpfulness, you repeat yourself. Don't entertain long conversations about the fix, especially if you've found them ...


16

It's not just okay to ask, you absolutely have to ask this question! What you're essentially talking about is an overqualified candidate. Whenever you have someone applying for a position that's below the level you'd expect of them and especially when it's below the level of their previous experience you need to figure out why. There are a variety of ...


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