Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

New answers tagged

1

The two terms "team lead" and "director" could have any meaning the company wants. I have seen team leads that were leading a team of two, and team leads leading a team of dozens. I have seen people with the title of director in a company of 10 people, and a company of 10,000 not have anybody with that title. Even titles such as VP can have any meaning. ...


2

Please ask yourself what do you have to contribute to the whole operation, given what your colleague has already taken responsibility for, and given the sourness you already brought in the relationship with your thoughts and words. Sometimes you are just redundant, trying to stomp somebody "in their place" is not going to save you. In fact, trying to stomp ...


9

You should get rid of Bill, if it's in your power to do so on your own decision, or look for another position for yourself if you can't. Bill sounds not so much as the 10x employee, like some comments here say, but more like Wally (from the comics strip Dilbert): someone who's good at making a lot of fuss; making it look like he's a model employee, while in ...


3

Bill is not your friend, but a guy trying (successfully) to take you out. He is probably actively setting you up for failure. He is injecting himself between you and your job which will make it easy to eliminate you. The annoying tasks he gives you are a ploy to make you not look like a team player. My boss did not help things when he told Bill 'Bill, you'...


1

I can see myself as being the 'Bill' guy. I did not think my boss was of much value, if not even decreasing it. He would meet at 11 am, after most time-critical tasks were over. He did ask me if I was happy with that arrangement, but I did not say no since I felt I would impose a standard on him. He would waste time with monologues or pointless meetings. ...


6

I asked if this is the "director-level role" they and I had discussed in the past and was told yes, but usually, what's the difference between the titles? In general, titles and their meaning vary greatly depending on each company and what they expect and how they define such title. However, in this specific case, team lead and director could be separate ...


46

You've been supplanted: you should start looking for a new position as soon as possible. Your boss thinks Bill is better at your job than you are. And, given that you're posting here about how to deal with it, he may have a point. As a team leader/manager, one should be able to deal with one's team effectively. I'm assuming you're not in the forces where ...


156

My boss did not help things when he told Bill 'Bill, you're the guy until OP rolls his lazy butt in at 11:00', and that 'OP is really better behind a desk'. That's a huge RED FLAG: You are working the wrong issue. Your problem is the CEO, not Bill. There are clear indications that your CEO thinks that Bill is better at your job or more valuable than you ...


71

Document the objective failings he has in his job. Don't document things that are subjective, like how you feel disrespected. He doesn't complete his assignments on time? Document it when it happens, as well as the consequences for the business. He complains that you aren't keeping him up to date on things? If you do this verbally, follow up with an ...


22

I spoke to our CEO about this issue, and he did not seem supportive at all. I told CEO that I felt Bill was stepping on my toes and needed to stay in his lane, both as his job description and an employee. He seemed dismissive of the whole issue "Don't let it bother you", "People will have different personalities, and you can't help that", and with advice to "...


1

What do you mean by reveal? Are people asking you "how are you so fast?"? Whatever you do, do NOT impose your productivity tricks on others because it will make people not want to work with you. My personal productivity tricks involve using my keyboard to quickly navigate my OS and do mundane things like switch windows, close things, open other things, ...


2

IMHO, you will have to know your environment and play by ear. I have worked in places where there the atmosphere rewarded sharing ways to make work better and others that, well, didn't. A variation of the later group would be working with someone who will take your trick and then go to your boss and convince him about some "improvements" in a way that your ...


1

Say you have a task that takes 12 hours. You spend 20 hours developing automation that reduces this to 5 minutes of work and 4 hours of "monitoring". There is ROI to be considered. It may take 2 hours to train someone else in the use of it. By all means share, but within a trusted circle, don't let a peer work without knowing about "global updates" for ...


2

What about working gradually? This is what I would do: I start by sharing one or two tips/tricks to the rest of the team, and check their respnse: someone might say "Hey, that's a neat trick you teached me. Let me teach you something that you didn't know: ...". If you have colleagues like this, you continue sharing your tips/tricks. If, however, they don't ...


3

Share them when you have been promoted. Then your team will look good compared to other teams (of course, with time the knowledge will spread). I don't agree with most other answers. You will get credit for sharing your tricks but it will be forgotten the next day.


-1

No, you should never reveal your productivity tricks to your peers. But you should reveal them, little by little, to your direct reports. Your ability is a form of power. Before giving power away in an organisation, first make sure you can trade it with other power. Otherwise, you will just make your own position weaker in the organisation. It's algebra, ...


14

Kate Gregory gave an excellent answer, but I'd like to expand on it with an additional reason to share: the peer review process. Your tools might "automate some repetitive tasks and improve productivity significantly", but what if there is an error in those tools? What if there are good reasons to do something manually? Speaking from experience, I did the ...


5

The biggest thing you need to weigh in on is, Are you looking to advance the company Are you looking to advance your career. A lot of these answers are, do what's best for the company, not what's best for yourself. If you keep these tricks to yourself and it gains you 10,000 dollars in a salary bump for being the most productive dev in your company, or if ...


21

I would think twice before sharing. For all you know, a lot of people are using these tricks. Does your manager typically appreciate clever things? Is your manager likely to share credit for your innovations with you? A lot of the people on stackexchange work in places that do reward innovation, automation and teamwork, but not every workplace is like that....


104

I agree with almost all points given in Kate Gregory's answer but would suggest two minor changes: First, I would not say "make me a lot faster than the rest of the team" (even in case it's true). I would go with "increase my productivity significantly". Second, I am not the biggest fan of "lunch and learn" (even if it counts as worktime) because many ...


6

People will find out. And if a company needs to let go someone, it will be the ones who focussed on looking good at the expense of others and the company. So once your manager finds out, you're in trouble. Best to publicly make the whole team more productive. But then you didn't mention in which country you work, so it might be different.


273

If you reveal it publicly (that is, everyone knows you have trained your peers) not only will you be more productive, but your whole team will be, and management will know why. By advancing the interests of the team and the company, you will be seen as someone making an important contribution. You're more likely to be promoted (for example, to team lead) or ...


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