Hot answers tagged

228

There already is a policy in place that says staff should inform at least 24 hours in advance - which no one seems to care about, clearly. Because it is completely out of touch with reality. You require what? People to notify you 24h before they get sick? Who are you hiring, child care or supernatural doctors? Imagine I strain my ankle on the stairs on my ...


156

How can I tell him that based on skills I don't see him as an appropriate candidate for the position in question without ruining our team spirit? You don't. You wish him good luck and that's it. It's not on you to to tell him you don't think he's qualified. Let him go through the interview process and for all you know he may surprise them. If you are ...


149

To what extent should I accomodate her requests? To the extent that you accommodate any request that you could extend to all your other team members as well. If it is no problem to offer a solution to all team members equally, just do so. Alternatives have already been named: Bring someone from HR (sounds very formal though) Have the meeting in a space ...


134

I was in this exact situation several years ago - I took it as a challenge. It made me work harder and I learnt so much from the process, and from the people who were supposedly junior to me. Being a staff/principal engineer isn't about knowing more than everyone else about a specific thing, it's about having experience, and the ability to translate the ...


133

I used to work for a very large US based company that used to pride itself in having a very large number of Engineers. It would constantly boast about the large numbers and how technically excellent it was - this was to the outside world. Internally there were regular town hall meetings that were delivered on various levels - Corporate, Business unit, ...


127

Given the situation and the (likely) motivation behind the Director asking each of your team, I think I'd advise the following: Be factual, truthful, and CAREFUL. Consideration #1: You are all being asked, and the same person is going to review all of the answers. This means that if your answer is noticeably different to your colleagues' then the difference ...


100

"I don't want us to trouble our Supervisor." Your Supervisor can speak up for himself. Could be that the supervisor asked, "what would help team morale? I have a budget from the company for this" and your co-worker said, the x-box. I probably would have asked for a hot mocha latte with whipped cream. I'd leave it alone.


92

People tend to wait until the last minute because they don't want to let everyone down by taking a day off. They feel a bit ill and hope it goes away. You should encourage them to call in early to warn you that there might be a problem, without having to make a definite decision. An analogy is that most people know that a ship in immediate trouble should ...


78

Is a public “shoutouts” channel a good or bad idea? It's a bad idea. A terrible one. Same as "employee of the month", for the reasons you yourself have mentioned. I've had personal experience with these in small companies, and most of the time the wrong (or popular) employees get the credit, and the hard working ones go unnoticed. This leads to ...


78

I would reasonably accommodate her requests but also explain her some boundaries: The first thing is that her concerns are important for her, so they can't be dismissed. At the same time she decided to join a team from a different culture, so it should be expected that she eventually adjusts to some of the local culture, and her team, rather than the ...


67

Given the current circumstances, you probably don't want to. Given the current circumstances with the pandemic, you probably don't want to discourage employees from taking a sick day, even if it is on short notice. If your childcare centre becomes a Covid hot spot because an employee decided to come in while sick, that would be really bad for your business, ...


60

When I'm confronted about this ("so what level are you actually?"), should I... Just tell them your level and move on in the conversation. If you don't make a big deal out of your title, the chances are much lower that anyone else will. I certainly wouldn't "acknowledge myself being overhire" or claim to be awesome at negotiation. It ...


59

Try something new Standups don't seem to be working for your team, why not run an experiment without them? Do your status reports by another method for a few weeks, and observe the results. I'm a confident, loud, western-cultured person, with nearly 10 years in my role, and the only expert at my company in many fields, and even I will downplay a negative ...


53

It's strange that nobody seems to have explicitly said this, but The objective of a 1:1 is to allow an open conversation between manager and the team member and, to me, a private environment such as a conference room promotes that objective, as well as allowing for employee privacy. If allowing open conversation from employee side is the main and real ...


45

Let me turn this around a bit: do you want to work for a company that never gets rid of incompetent bosses? Don't get me wrong - I wouldn't turn this into a "Burn down everything!" scorched-earth occasion, ripping your boss to shreds. But I also wouldn't omit or sugar coat everything to meaninglessness. Your boss is incompetent, and that ...


40

Careful! Don't shoot yourself in the foot by talking about being overhired. It sounds like you're highly competent, just feeling a little overmatched in a new environment, which is to be expected... Your view of the team can go in a negative direction (being intimidated) or a positive direction (feeling respect). I think you should focus on the positive side....


39

The mistake that many westerners make is forgetting that different cultures put different emphasis on different values, and this has been the bane of international business for a long time, and now as the world is getting smaller, individual teams are facing the same issues. In Korean and Japanese culture, bringing up potentially embarrassing things publicly ...


33

@Kaz's answer is really good. I would like one more thing, a concrete strategy I found useful in similar situations. The questions sound typically corporate, leadership, ability to deliver on objectives, strengths and weaknesses. It seems like you can answer in "free" text to at least some of the questions. Instead of describing him as "the ...


32

Make your employees feel more comfortable about calling off earlier. You said each employee always has a doctor's note? Well, then they probably aren't calling off of work until they are sure that they are sick enough for a doctor to give them a note. If you want this to change, then step 1 is almost assuredly removing the need for a doctor's note. They are ...


31

Ask yourself these three questions (context taken from your narrative): Is being talkative a problem? Are they disturbing you / others from getting their work done? Are they speaking in loud voices? Are they arguing all the time? Are they disrupting the concentration and focus needed for work? Is being friendly a problem? Are they violating the personal ...


29

If the "veterans" are also friends outside of work, you can't prevent them having a separate whatsapp group. That would be ridiculous. In your question you only state that you suspect them having a whatsapp group. So what? What is your problem with that? Do they discuss work related topics there, does this hinder workplace communication with the ...


28

Frame it positively: Name areas he should improve to become a Lead. Be as clear and actionable as possible. That way, you support your coworker and tell he what he has to do to reach his word. Some sample phrasing could be: You told us you want to become Lead Dev. I greatly appreciate that you take responsibilty and that you want to improve things. I know ...


24

I've been on the other side of this with people being brought into our team as the Team lead or head architect who the team felt was at our same level or maybe a little lower. I would say the only thing one of them did wrong, was throwing their weight around to prove that they deserve the position. Just be a good teammate and it will work out. If there is ...


24

You could do two things - one, ask the employee what support they want from you earlier in the discussion, but two, set expectations with the employee about how these things work in a professional environment. On the one hand, even though it sounds like you didn't actually take any action yet except for counseling her and pointing out the company policy, she ...


23

I'm a Muslim man and I faced couple of situations where each time I have to meet with a women colleague in my office or in a meeting room. In many cases the colleague was not a Muslim (that is to say; the issue like the one you exposed is not a thing for them). As a Muslim I can't allow myself to be with a woman in a space which is closed or is out of sight, ...


21

I feel it is my duty to pose a situational challenge to this question. You are entirely out of line: You are paying more attention to your colleagues duties than your own. You are eavesdropping on office conversations which are none of your business. You are spending office hours concerning yourself with others' personal matters. You are exposing your ...


21

If the concern is about a muslim woman being alone with a man in a room, it seems like a solution might be to have a video 1:1 from different rooms.


19

I understand the desire of every business to be as efficient as possible with its expenses. But why wouldn't you have an extra person or two scheduled for a few morning hours with option to extend for the rest of the day if needed? This will help with morning rush, and move your potential staffing issues to a day light and not the night when you cant get ...


19

Is it my responsibility to tell a team member off whom I think is crossing the line No. From what you describe here, it's hard to say if your team member's behavior is appropriate or not. For the sake of discussion let's assume that it is. Unfortunately people who behave inappropriately have little of the self-awareness necessary to listen to or take advice....


19

It has nothing to do with you personally. Just have someone from HR attend the meeting. Or someone she is ok with (eg. Coworker) on the condition the meeting is still a 1:1 and discussions are only between you two. Put in the open might not be a good if people are nearby, but something like a canteen with a quiet spot might be suitable.


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