New answers tagged

0

Here's a few practical ideas for resolving this. Try to separate code review comments into objective and subjective points. Objective points include observations such as "there is a potential bug here", or "this does not match the requirements". Subjective comments include "there's a better way to do this", or "this would be better named X". It' often ...


17

Will it be silly to congratulate him as a reply to that mail thread? It's not silly at all to congratulate a co-worker who got promoted. I'm sure he would appreciate it as much as you would have appreciated it had you been promoted. Don't do a Reply All to the email with your congratulations. Instead, do it in person if you can, or via a phone call or ...


2

Think about what you would do if they would hire a new boss for both of you externally instead of promoting one of you. How would you react to that mail then? I don't think you can go wrong with that reaction.


4

Will it be silly to thank him as a reply to that mail thread? There is no obligation to even reply. It's his moment in the sun, it's doubtful he's worried about you.


2

Enjoy lunch, it's not you who's hiring them. At the end of the day, it will still be your manager making the final call on who gets hired. Don't treat this as "your stage" of an interview process, or any kind of test that you need to apply to them. Your role here, is simply to go for a friendly lunch and get to know the person you may be working with. ...


13

The best thing to do -imho-: don‘t make it a job interview. If your manager just has a slight idea what you are looking for, then he already asked a lot of question and thinks him to be a good fit from a technical point of view. Take the lunch exactly as the manager told you: find out if the new colleague is a good fit social wise. Talk with him about ...


2

You mention in the comment that managment believe the reason is low pay. So you actually have an unfriendly, deaf work enviroment that is not compensating for the discomfort. The problem is that managment don't want to change it. They don't want to rise pay, or to make work life easier (for examply by opening bar on tools and work equpiment). If they ...


2

I would suggest exit interviews, but very few people ever tell the truth in those (not wanting to burn bridges). My current company has an annual anonymous surveys, conducted by an outside, third-paerty, company. We believe them to be truly anonymous because no one has been disciplined for feedback. Would your management accept this? If not, and you ...


1

The key point missing here is your vision of what it means to be in a leadership position is short-sighted. That's okay, many people who aren't in leadership positions don't inherently understand them. And, while you're receiving criticism for your intentions, it does seem like you have a reasonable goal: You want to be the boss of a high performing team. ...


0

The group that I'm leading right now is looking for ways to improve responses to the question Just fill out the survey yourself if you want better answers, lol. Your group is going to come up with some absurd motivational poster campaign that will not be worth the paper it is printed on. You are a data analytics company which exists to sell people stuff. ...


0

Bonuses and a pep talk is the tried and tested method. The talk on it's own is just air, but a little spending money is always well received and remembered. Even a lunch shout would go down well with a few pats on the back.


2

My team has been split into groups to discuss ways to increase positive answers on this survey. This seems to me to be the wrong objective. Why are you focusing on "increasing positive answers" rather than on "improving whatever it is the employees are unhappy with". You might think the two are equivalent. I'd guess the employees do not; I guess they'd ...


2

Yep. There's a ton of research on this: https://hbr.org/2015/12/getting-to-si-ja-oui-hai-and-da http://www.businessinsider.com/how-different-cultures-understand-time-2014-5 http://thearticulateceo.typepad.com/my-blog/2011/09/cultural-differences-the-power-distance-relationship.html http://changingminds.org/explanations/culture/hall_culture.htm http://...


0

I've only worked in knowledge-based companies, so my experience is limited. But I believe Grove's observation is correct. The ethic of leadership that avoids giving direct orders comes, in no small part, from the work of Robert Greenleaf, an industrial psychologist with the old Bell Telephone company. See this https://www.worldcat.org/title/servant-as-...


0

I understand clearly what he wants to accomplish by doing such kind of things. He is overly ambitious person and wants me to be seen in bad light and then fired from my job, so that he is the star in the team. What evidence do you have? How can I deal with him as I don't want to deny his requests as I'm a very soft hearted and polite man? I'm going to ...


-1

As I agree with @Mär I would to add few words, Your colleague is being a bitch for a second time , that's might not be intentional to hurt your feelings and reputation in your work place, but that is a definite result for such action, Here there is two evil actions happening, taking over a ticket assigned to you "1st", actually the reason for that ...


0

I don't want to deny his requests as I'm a very soft hearted and polite man? I understand the feeling, however some requests are not pure. The solution to this is not to attempt to deal with it realtime, but instead create canned responses ahead of time. This is not a new idea, we train our children the same way regarding stranger danger. If he wants to ...


0

You'd better realise very quickly and very certainly that you're in a dangerous situation. Right after that, you should start getting particularly angry that a little rat face is manipulating you with the premeditated, determined goal to suck you dry until he can spit out the last bits of dregs - all for his own entertainment. He is actively enjoying every ...


2

Your manager should be the one directing your work activities. If anyone else tries to, you should ask yourself, What would my manager want me to do? If the answer to that is not obvious, go ask your manager. Do not allow other staff to usurp your manager's role. In the meantime, give your coworker a non-committal generic response. Don't give them ...


8

"I'll think about it." is a good immediate response. It is polite to give thought to his suggestions, but remember they are suggestions, not orders that must be obeyed. If the junior developer has a strong personality, never make a final decision about his suggestions in his presence. Stick to "I'll think about it.". What you actually do must be based on ...


7

I don't want to deny his requests as I'm a very soft hearted and polite You're going to need to learn how to say "No." I'm not saying you need to become mean or rude, but you are going to need to learn to stand up for yourself.


14

How can I deal with him as I don't want to deny his requests as I'm a very soft hearted and polite man? Sorry to say this but if you want this to stop then you will have to deny this person's requests. Next time this person suggests you do something, politely reply "That seems like an interesting idea. However, I have some other things to do, so you will ...


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