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Here's an idea to help work on the relationship you have with this colleague. Sit down together away from the day-to-day (cafe, outdoor bench / park), take two post-it notes and two sharpie markers. Given them a sharpie and post-it, you use the other set. Say "I wanted to check-in on how you and I are working. I would like us both to write down a number ...


2

First, be careful with the phrase "maintain high coding standards and beautiful code.". Regarding Standards Who decides what the standards are? There are many code-style standards out there, and most are equally valid, as long as a single one is used consistently within a codebase. If you are the product owner, manager, or the undisputed most ...


4

It sounds like there's a lack of trust present in this team. To be honest, to me it sounds like the colleagues who 'don't resist' might be doing so out of convenience since, as you say, they don't seem to care about quality and will just take the easiest path. In that regard, the colleague who 'resists' might just be disagreeing with you, and the two of you ...


0

I will answer the general question "colleagues who constantly give you resistance?" and not comment the precise examples given. I have had the same situation in the past so I will try to explain what worked for me. My advices are: Do not take it personally. Your colleague has probably the same behavior with other people. Do not stop writing ...


1

Figure out their motivations and reasons and see if this is compatible with them. Fundamentally, the priority of many employees is keeping the boss happy, especially for today. That is their first and foremost goal and it is almost certain to be high up for the rest. It is certainly high up on priorities. If you are at a company where people are evaluated ...


6

> The real gripe is that this employee still gets all the benefits of the other employees; pay rises, bonuses, meals out paid for by the company etc. So the real problem is not that the occasional lateness of this person causes any actual issues for you, your colleagues or the company. But that his/her lateness is "unfair" for you and your ...


-7

This looks like a you problem. Has this person's tardiness affected the results of her work? Has it upset the team's results in any meaningful way? Does anyone's work output suffer if this person is several minutes late? If the answer to all those questions is no, then this is a you problem. You have a problem with this person, not the company, not the team. ...


10

The key question here is "what's the problem with this employee being late?". If the meeting goal can be achieved without them, then who cares if they are late or not? If the meeting fails, than the consequences of the fail should be obvious and it's perfectly ok to ask employee responsible for the fail to fix it or at least what they are planning ...


1

A team is built by a shared purpose and by communication among the team. What you noted is that there is less shared purpose. People who are more concerned about staying alive than working on yet another client issue - don't work as hard on the client issue. You are at a disadvantage because of "People also worry about the company's future which I can't ...


1

Get them more involved & engaged. Do you have a new project coming? Pull them into the meetings earlier, ask them to help with the design, and ask them "how would YOU do it?". Let them feel their voice is heard (and actually do it). Ask each one of them: "what can we do better as a team?" Embrace the good ideas. Encourage their ...


8

Two things jumped out to me: significant management and technical turnover in team B teams A and C [...] perform the work of team B despite not having the bandwidth or authority I'm assuming team B reached a critical failure threshold and is no longer functioning, and is unable to fix itself due to loss of expertise. Given the dependency of A->B->...


1

You question seems to be around a performance goal that seems to be unattainable. If you tried forming a working group and that was unsuccessful, then it's time to involve upper management. They have the authority to restructure things. Team B is frustrated and overworked Clearly management needs to look at resourcing as it appears that Team B needs more ...


2

You should not approach this as a problem caused by the coworkers being friends. I have worked in the financial industry and I understand your worries about the situation. If they mess up, they could end the company and someone could possibly go to jail even if it wasn’t malicious. If you approach this as a problem caused by your coworkers being friends, you’...


4

To your question specifically, the fact that they're living together, or friends, has nothing to do with their job performance It's possible they may be violating company policy by not managing their changes through a proper change control process... However! As someone who has worked at many regulated orgs.... It is sometimes amazing what they decide isn't ...


1

If you want to change the dynamic without making is a personal issue, in your team meeting, you could consider asking about TDD/BDD style practices. That could change the nature of peer-reviews and improve what you're hinting as low-quality practices.


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