Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

New answers tagged

7

I too am a software developer. The answerers telling you that "if you're actually a domain expert you should be able to explain it" and quoting Einstein are not actually answering your question. The situation you find yourself in is extremely common. I am fortunate enough to have a ratio of software developers to management of 5:1. The managers have been ...


7

It's hard to unravel the social aspects of your question, but I think that's as much because of how you are personally mixing the social and professional aspects as it is a sign that the two are actually interwoven. In other words, don't get hung up on social skills as a way to create trust. In fact, trust created purely by way of social prowess is probably ...


1

A few things I would like to suggest here. Keep an open mind. Often people get lost in minute details and makes mistakes, that are basic. If you are challenging someone else's solution, then be ready to be challenged back. Many times explaining things to someone, sharpens the idea. Concealed talent brings no reputation. If you want to be accepted as an ...


16

When I was a beginner many years ago, there was a situation when I understood something, the PM understood it, but the rest of the team did not. My explanations were not very useful. The discussions only closed temporarily until they opened again on the same topic. I was initially confused by the approach of the PM, but I eventually understood it and ...


2

Layoffs happened. You admit your outlook has changed, You believe your coworker has changed. Those changes are inevitable. Layoffs impact performance. People were let go, even though some of them were hard workers. The people that survive a layoff are impacted also. They may have to do more work. They may voluntarily work harder to make themselves ...


2

Ultimately, this is in the boss' hands; sit down and talk with them about your concerns. I mean, there are several things to unpack here. First up: is what your coworker doing wrong? There's no clean answer to that. For all we know, this is what your boss wants to have happen. Question about the Floobar system or how to use Quineticles? Well, Pete ...


8

I don't know how comfortable you are with this idea, but it may be that you will need to sit down with your coworker and tell him "I want you to know I really appreciated all the help that you have given me with (XYZ technology) on the tracker. I've got it working now and everything is cool and I just wanted you to know that so you don't have to spend so ...


10

Another thing that might be important to note is that the three of us are long-time friends outside of work. This is probably the most important part to take into account since this issue is likely to affect your friendship or even end it forever. I wouldn’t talk to your manager behind his back, you owe him at least a warning before it comes to that. ...


2

Is it time to raise the issue to our manager? Yes If so, how? Tell them what you told us. If possible, have it documented.


2

My advice would be to simply ignore the drama and chow down on work. If your manager starts giving you a hard time for that, you start documenting about her behaviour towards you... That way, it can show that you're interested in the work and that you're able to fight through office drama like this. It can also get you "the long end" in any discussion - you'...


1

You need to back up your suggestions and your solutions with scientific arguments and proofs, design thinking methodology. Don't through singular solutions share your opinion with structured procedures


14

You make your suggestion and if they don’t accept it then let them choose their own. But don’t offer to do their solution... If they then come back to you as it has failed or struggled, re-offer your solution. Worked for me in several spheres but don’t offer to repair their solution : that way madness lies...


1

What do you mean by reveal? Are people asking you "how are you so fast?"? Whatever you do, do NOT impose your productivity tricks on others because it will make people not want to work with you. My personal productivity tricks involve using my keyboard to quickly navigate my OS and do mundane things like switch windows, close things, open other things, ...


2

IMHO, you will have to know your environment and play by ear. I have worked in places where there the atmosphere rewarded sharing ways to make work better and others that, well, didn't. A variation of the later group would be working with someone who will take your trick and then go to your boss and convince him about some "improvements" in a way that your ...


1

Say you have a task that takes 12 hours. You spend 20 hours developing automation that reduces this to 5 minutes of work and 4 hours of "monitoring". There is ROI to be considered. It may take 2 hours to train someone else in the use of it. By all means share, but within a trusted circle, don't let a peer work without knowing about "global updates" for ...


2

What about working gradually? This is what I would do: I start by sharing one or two tips/tricks to the rest of the team, and check their respnse: someone might say "Hey, that's a neat trick you teached me. Let me teach you something that you didn't know: ...". If you have colleagues like this, you continue sharing your tips/tricks. If, however, they don't ...


3

Share them when you have been promoted. Then your team will look good compared to other teams (of course, with time the knowledge will spread). I don't agree with most other answers. You will get credit for sharing your tricks but it will be forgotten the next day.


-1

No, you should never reveal your productivity tricks to your peers. But you should reveal them, little by little, to your direct reports. Your ability is a form of power. Before giving power away in an organisation, first make sure you can trade it with other power. Otherwise, you will just make your own position weaker in the organisation. It's algebra, ...


14

Kate Gregory gave an excellent answer, but I'd like to expand on it with an additional reason to share: the peer review process. Your tools might "automate some repetitive tasks and improve productivity significantly", but what if there is an error in those tools? What if there are good reasons to do something manually? Speaking from experience, I did the ...


5

The biggest thing you need to weigh in on is, Are you looking to advance the company Are you looking to advance your career. A lot of these answers are, do what's best for the company, not what's best for yourself. If you keep these tricks to yourself and it gains you 10,000 dollars in a salary bump for being the most productive dev in your company, or if ...


21

I would think twice before sharing. For all you know, a lot of people are using these tricks. Does your manager typically appreciate clever things? Is your manager likely to share credit for your innovations with you? A lot of the people on stackexchange work in places that do reward innovation, automation and teamwork, but not every workplace is like that....


1

Here are some tips from a person who was on both sides, asking and receiveing the same question: firstly help them but not straigt away answering, but instead hinting them in the right direction, and making them think for themselves secondly, make sure you never criticize an idea, no matter how bad it is, otherwise they will be scared to make their own ...


1

I can completely understand why you feel left out, but it would certainly be the wrong thing to do to bring this up with management, and it would certainly be inappropriate to bring it up in a team meeting. This means the projects are rarely discussed in the office and are mostly discussed in chat rooms on weekends This would heavily indicate to me that ...


104

I agree with almost all points given in Kate Gregory's answer but would suggest two minor changes: First, I would not say "make me a lot faster than the rest of the team" (even in case it's true). I would go with "increase my productivity significantly". Second, I am not the biggest fan of "lunch and learn" (even if it counts as worktime) because many ...


6

People will find out. And if a company needs to let go someone, it will be the ones who focussed on looking good at the expense of others and the company. So once your manager finds out, you're in trouble. Best to publicly make the whole team more productive. But then you didn't mention in which country you work, so it might be different.


7

It's probably best to assume that you're colleagues had no bad intentions. This may or may not be the case, but it seems best to give them some credit. As Patricia Shanahan pointed out in the comments, it may well be that the other person asked them proactively. My suggestion is not to focus on the missed project in the past, but try to become part of the ...


273

If you reveal it publicly (that is, everyone knows you have trained your peers) not only will you be more productive, but your whole team will be, and management will know why. By advancing the interests of the team and the company, you will be seen as someone making an important contribution. You're more likely to be promoted (for example, to team lead) or ...


2

When working to change behaviors, I really like thinking about the influence model. There's research that supports the importance of each of the four activities you should pursue: Role modeling: Are you diligent in taking a solution-focused approach to your discussions with your team members? Do team members see you raising solutions to other teams and ...


14

First of all, what not to do: Don't go to your team members and announce: I don't want you to bring me problems, I want you to bring solutions. Unfortunately, I have seen that from managers before and the effect it has is to give the impressions that you don't care and people might give up. Junior members are junior and often lack the experience to come up ...


-7

One of my managers sorted that issue in one meeting when he said “from now on you can only propose a problem if you accompany it with two possible solutions”... Step change in behavior... It worked. Others would then critique the solutions and offer others. Our team won the quality award that year... With that manager... Not all people who come to ...


0

What I think is most suitable is Global Operations Team. Pick a suitable title for members for Europe and India, and give each member of the team a choice to use either one. Make sure they are aware that they are equivalent.


1

The short answer is: you can name the team any way you want. There is no general rule, as you are already aware of. As supporting arguments, here are some of my answers: Answer 1 Answer 2 And an answer from another user (@bethlakshmi): Answer 3 In Peopleware. Productive Projects and Teams, chapter 19, Ton DeMarco and Timothy Lister talk about an ...


1

You are concerned that it may be or seem unnecessary to hire a new team member as long as your current output is fine. Let me clarify what this implies: Additional personal only gets hired AFTER problems have arisen. Meaning in some way there has already been damage to your team, some budget, some relation to a customer, product quality etc. THEN you START ...


1

You obviously have to do this in a way that doesn’t make you look bad. That person wants to know everything, doesn’t actually anything to help, and you suspect they try to take credit for your work. Forget the third part. Focus on the first and second part, which would look strange to anyone. Go to the company owner and just ask what the role of this ...


3

I'm going to assume by being "the company manager" you hold the highest managerial position of the company, and the "manager" you refer to is the owner of the company. If by "tell the company owner what's really happening" you mean that you'll explain to the owner that credit for your work is being stolen, you can expect to get called childish and ignored. ...


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