New answers tagged

-1

I think that anything that you do to attempt to change the current system is going to cause them to view you as the weird guy. In my opinion, you should choose either to go with the group, fit in as much as possible, and get the benefits of going out with the group, or alternatively just not participate. You are (were, four years ago) the new guy and based ...


2

Is this professional? Expressing concern for ongoing projects, if supported by valid reasoning, is always professional. However it would be seen as very unprofessional to do it through a backchannel. In clear, you should speak with the shareholder AND the current team you have problems with openly. Speaking with your shareholder friend would bring a ...


1

Express your concerns with your current manager. Leave your old manager out of this. You wouldn't contact your past managers under similar circumstances and you wouldn't go straight to the company's shareholders either, so keep it professional and don't try to skip the important steps to have your concerns addressed. There are a few reasons for this. The ...


1

Cutting most of the filler away, I think the question ends up being How can we transform from a startup to a big company? There's not a defined answer. Some companies grow on their own, adapting their own policies and strategies. Some use a big outsider investor, which also closely monitors & aids on whatever is needed for the startup to grow ...


0

In addition to the other answers here there is a certain psychological aspect to the way your senior views you, that is people put far more value on things they pay for. In your case you are an unpaid intern, and your company is getting you for free. Why would they expect anything of value to come out of someone that they themselves have put no value on? If ...


1

Two things. It takes time for people to absorb and accept new ideas. Don't expect this "senior" to smack his forehead and say "that's great!" when you make a suggestion. Give him time. Give him time to save face: he may be embarrassed that you thought of something he missed. If the company actually adopts your ideas, that's good. You're making a positive ...


5

Yes, every company I've worked for has had something like this. However they've all been called something different, whether it was 'special projects', 'marketing support', 'research' or whatever. As you've noticed, once a company gets out of the 'start up' phase, development needs to be planned, often months or years ahead. The business sets their ...


4

Whenever I want to talk with him about any new idea which may be good for our product, he replies to me in a very arrogant manner and always degrades me and my idea. However, whenever our new version is launched, the new feature which I suggested is added. If your ideas keep getting added, they're probably good ideas. You should draw confidence from this! ...


2

You have a terrible work environment. You need to make a plan to leave. There are three distinct things wrong here: You are not being paid. I am not sure whether this is the norm in India, but that is a problem you will eventually need to correct as you will want to eat one day. Your ideas are being stolen. That is just unfair. Sometimes this will happen, ...


1

What's wrong with him? It is not at all clear if he is doing anything wrong or you are just too sensitive. May be your idea was indeed bad or maybe you did not present it correctly. or he is actually as bad as you are making him sound. No one can tell that and do not worry about diagnosing what is wrong with him. That is not important. What should I do?...


5

From the company's point of view, you told them you would be absent for 4 weeks, and them come back for a while before you leave for good. You say you are the most junior member of the team. That means that in reality, if you were going to stay for two or three years, it would be worth the cost of training you for maybe the first year in the hope that the ...


1

You could talk to your manager and ask why the change in the atmosphere at work. However, I am wondering about how you got in this situation in the first place. I suspect the answer might be "You are leaving soon". If that is the case, there might not be much you can do, other than bring forward your plan to leave. I have also been asked by my manager ...


1

The unfortunate truth is that (at least here in America) colleagues/managers tend to talk to/befriend you mostly because they need something from you (usually they need you in their role). Once that need goes away, often the relationship does as well. I've seen this multiple times even when people simply switch roles within the same team. They make new '...


8

While it’s understood to not be as deep or long-term as a marriage, your job is still a collection of relationships. So try this situation out on other relationships. If your new husband (congratulations!) left for a few weeks and told you that he was planning on divorcing you in eight months, how would that impact your interaction with him? Yes, the ...


78

I'm honestly surprised that you're surprised by this. You essentially already have one foot out of the door - and have just given the team a month to get used to working without you. It might seem wasteful not to fully utilise a resource that's going to be there for another 7-8 months, and truth be told it is in my opinion. But that is easier said than done ...


6

While I don't leave for a long time like in your case. I do declare my intention to leave my company a while back to my Leader and manager. A lot of things have changed since I have returned and its getting hard for me to cope up nowadays. Should I expect this to continue? Is it advisable to shift jobs now, because I will be leaving within a few ...


133

It is just corporate life, not you A colleague of mine returned from a 4-week vacation yesterday. In that time, our boss left for a new company. Maybe 3 minutes was spent catching the colleague up on that before we all returned to our usual work. When the boss left, there wasn't a lot of fanfare or discussion. He cleared out his office, we spent maybe a ...


1

I am going to tackle this from the organizational side. The way this should be done, even for bugfixes, even for small ones, is via ticket/issue. If this was the case, make sure a person is assigned to a ticket and it is clear whether or not the ticket is currently in progress. Make sure to put a policy in place, in case you want multiple people to work on ...


11

Your team needs to get organised better. Two people trying to fix the same problem is a waste of time. And the way you tell this story, it seems you don’t do code reviews - that’s something you ought to change. Apart from that: The bug is fixed, so what is the problem?


11

Unless his fix is flawed you should thank him and move on. Even if the bug is in code you wrote, it's not really your bug nor is it your code. It is the company's code and the company's mission is to deploy that code without bugs. Your colleague is doing the company a favor by fixing bugs. It's great that you want to be responsible for all code you ...


0

In my experience, right after the shake up is when you want to try to get your move - I wouldn't wait. I've managed teams for about 11 years now. If someone goes to HR first, that would either really tick me off, or make me feel bad, depending on whether I knew there was an issue or not. And as an executive, I know you'd be labeled as a trouble maker. (I ...


0

According to the OP it's a scrum project, so my first hint is to use the scrum tag which allows to find the posting easier. The second critique is that the initial sentence doesn't make much sense. quote: “I'm a technical lead who also line manages developers. One of the devs (lets call her Alice) I manage works in a separate scrum team to the ones I'...


1

"several times Bob has used his authority to silence Alice and prevent further discussions on ways to improve the team." "separate scrum team".` A scrum team is a team of developers without roles. This should be raised by the scrum master to the dev team on whether this is how they would like to operate. Talk to the scrum master for the dev team ...


-1

If there's no higher authority, you could ask the other team leaders to help write some technical standards. In the first place, that shows Bob (or possibly you ;-) the standard that everyone else wants. If that fails, you can go to a non-technical authority with proof that Bob isn't a team player and is failing to uphold what is now 'company standards'.


4

Bob wants to "fire" Alice, over what sounds to be disagreements of substance not just expression. Meanwhile you think Alice is accomplishing good work, but perhaps could use some coaching on communication. Sounds like what you really need to do is move Alice off Bob's project team and onto yours. Trying to force "help" where it isn't wanted just won't ...


7

That's a tricky situation to deal with. I think the easiest way out of this (for now) would be to move Alive out of Bob's team back to yours or a place that's more compatible with her style & values. Maybe there is a swap that can be orchestrated. In the long term, there needs to be a way to address the mismatch between Bob and you/Alice. You need ...


6

My question now is: in what order should I ask various stakeholders to change to a different sub-team? I don't think there's a formalized process for this at the company -- perhaps I should try to check with our HR first? Since you don't appear to know/understand the proper protocol at your company, your first visit should be with HR, to ask about it....


1

Who is responsible? Consider the following: You are only responsible for the work that can reasonably be expected of you to finish. As you said yourself, you are not in a manager position. Your job is to get as much work done during your normal working hours. It's advisable to work as efficient as you can and this has very little to do with how ...


14

Naturally, people need a bit of time to "get in the zone" of working and some do it by hanging out a bit at the start of the day. Everybody is different. Some people get in the office "ready to roll" so-to-speak, others need a coffee, a bit of time to settle in, or some other "ritual" to get them in the zone. So the first question to ask yourself is whether ...


12

You answered your own question. I have no team lead or managerial responsibilities. Until and unless that casual talk is affecting your productivity (loud voices, creating disturbance, unavailable for meeting / discussion etc.), ignore them and carry on with your work. As clarified in the comments, If the team is actually losing their work-time in ...


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