New answers tagged

-1

Problem #1: set of individuals If a developer can provide and maintain a consistent API, why care about conventions? They are the person who knows the code. No one else is going to maintain the implementation. Do care mainly about the API. Problem #2: reinvent the wheel Indeed this is a problem. Common code should be separated in a company or team repo. ...


6

I’m a manager in the banking industry in a group that has similar problems. I’m going to pretend like you report to me and tell you what I need: A sense of urgency to achieve the business objectives. If you don’t know what the objectives are, ask. (What drives our economic engine and what’s our mission statement?) Communicate all the time. Let me know what’...


5

It's clear you work with a bunch of cowboys, you aren't going to change that. Their motto should be "We haven't got time to do it properly, but we've got time to do it twice." But stop fixing their mess for free unless you have to, and if you have to then make sure it's documented somewhere.


3

People are talking here about what management might want, which is an appropriate answer for your current job. I'd like to take a twist on the question, talking about your personal assessment and what you might want, esp. few years later. I am taking it in a sense from my perspective, as I did a lot of programming in my life, too. Find your type There are ...


2

The core problem is that your manager doesn't care about code quality, because they have no incentive to do so. Therefore the first question must be: can you incentivise them to care, e.g. by keeping track of hours wasted reworking fast devs' bad code? Unfortunately I'm going to guess the answer is "no". I'm also going to guess your manager is a ...


111

My project is related to previous projects (that are resolved), that have many bugs and I fix them along with my project. Stop paying their debt. When you encounter a bug, write it up. If it doesn't block your work, move on. If it does, ask management for approval to fix. This does two things. First, management sees your timeline expand because you are ...


17

Management decides the balance, especially in banking. Many people don't really appreciate that more carefully crafted code has fewer bugs. To many of them, new bugs are just unanticipated work that popped up out of nowhere rather than debt that was accrued and now must be paid off. In their mind, a quick implementation with a pile of bugs should be budgeted ...


3

The problem relies on these: Make myself not look bad relative to my team, to upper management Delivery of the projects, if the project/task has been delivered on time or ahead of time even how much it was so bug prone, to the higher management who knows nothing about the backend process, this will become a really good work for them. Management will always ...


12

All work is a series of compromises. There is a saying: "Good, Fast, Cheap. Choose two". Sometimes the "best" workers are the ones that get the balance right. That may include shipping poor quality work that may come back to bite you later. Having said that, a lot of the time, managers think they have the balance right, only for a project ...


0

I am looking through a code and say ok that can be done better That is your first and the most important mistake. If you consider that it is a big problem, just create a ticket bug report / whatever. It would then be analyzed by the responsible people in the project and eventually fixed. If the decision is to not fix it, then just move forward. Colleague ...


3

It is possible that he resents your swooping in to reclaim your mantle of senior on “his” project, in which case I’d talk to him about that, and then if that fails the two of you can talk to your manager. But it’s also very possible that after an absence of three years, you don’t understand the project as well as you think; there may be complexities that you ...


1

As a software professional who's been in this business for ... (koff, koff, wheeze) ... "quite a while now," the basic situation that you are now describing is: "legacy systems." For example – "my present employer has been manufacturing sofas for more than 85 years." When IBM first introduced the "System/36," they ...


1

You have two issues which could be in conflict with each other Managing the "technical stack" Managing a technical person Managing the "technical stack" is deciding what languages, tools, frameworks, and testing systems the company will use - especially for critical production work. No one developer should be allowed to change that ...


0

"If you really feel that you need to," go ahead and toot your own horn a little – "hey, I fixed it!" Don't say anything negative about anyone else – not to your boss and not to anyone else. (You have no idea what's on that senior-developer's plate ...! And, you can safely presume that "s/he is not slighting you.") And – take ...


3

If this is the first time you have performed beyond what would normally be expected for your relatively junior position, it will seem very important to you. I still remember mine, and it was about 50 years ago. In the bigger picture, what matters is that you have the skills, talent, and determination to succeed at solving difficult problems. Congratulations! ...


-1

It is clear that they are going out of their way to be rude to you, and that they have very little justification for doing so. They also removed you from the acknowledgements, which is an (albeit weak) attempt to damage your professional credibility. In those circumstances you have three options: Be a better person. This is trickier than it sounds, and not ...


-2

Bottom Line In the absence of clearly communicated expectations, when somebody asks you to review something, it's strange for you to assume that copyediting was off the table if you didn't say so. You were busy and life is chaotic, which is fair, but those are just excuses. On the other side of the coin, it was a huge mistake for this person to submit their ...


2

To be honest, in my experience, in order to be able to successfully negotiate in situations like, you first need to be in a position where you can tell them, "Go to hell," I'm not saying that is what you do or where you start your talk but you need to have your own back. You may never have to use it. Having it will carry you a long way but it needs ...


2

How does one manage this other than leaving, unless that's the only option? Assuming that the understaffing is the root problem here, it depends on the reason for it. If it's forced by economics, then yes you're probably stuck with this situation unless you leave. And being plain, if there is more work than can be done yet still not enough resources to hire,...


2

Compartmentalize and prioritize are what you are looking for. I work in a similar context, we are struggling because of the amount of work and the lack of workers. After a brainstorming, we have come this way: every job has a priority every priority has an amount of time we take our top priorities and we dedicate it the amount of time we have assigned to it,...


2

Obviously communication is key here, like the other answers already point out. You need to discuss with your manager, and prioritize. To add to the other answers I would suggest putting together a workbook, A day in the life of... Show all tasks that you work on daily, weekly and monthly. How long they take, who they go out to, requested by, criticality... ...


5

Normally, you make a list of tasks, estimate the effort to complete the tasks, and then you prioritize with the agreement of a manager. However, you say: Teams that were 40 people 4 years ago are now 5 total people. which means that workload increased pretty much 8 times per person. Even though prioritization can be still done, it is highly unlikely that ...


56

You prioritize. And, when you manager says “I want X” you do it but they have to understand that Y no longer gets done. It’s a difficult concept for some managers that the time, or work, available is a finite amount. We had this once where there were 4 jobs needing completion by Friday. Went to our manager and told him one would have to be postponed to ...


16

Don't involve the senior dev in the discussion in any way. Just take it to your boss, and say something like "Well, I spent all weekend on it, and I figured it out, and I fixed it." As a junior programmer, making it clear to the boss that you totally buckled down and fixed a hard problem on your own (and might like some approval now) is normal and ...


-5

Write a memo to your senior colleague telling her that you solved the problem and therefore she can stop worrying about it. Praise and thank her for declining to spoon-feed you the solution to the problem, thus allowing you the opportunity to expand your skills and grow professionally etc etc blah blah blah. CC your manager.


-10

There are several clues as to why this person behaved in the way he/she did. First I notice you said it was a very chaotic time and you did not have any time to do X, Y, and Z. So you were very busy. Yet, it sounds like this thesis is very important and you asked someone to review it. In my opinion, this person has a right to be upset. You made it well known ...


9

You say at the top that "but their main concern was if the content made sense and had good logic flow". If they had asked to point out typos, you would have probably asked for an editable copy as well, correct? You perhaps should have mentioned that there were still a lot of typos that needed to be cleaned up, but it's also understandable to ...


2

However, since at least 4 months, he is ignoring me completely The following words suggest they are not ignoring you. But he always comes with answers like "do it yourself now, and I'll check later" There could be many reasons for this response. Maybe they are too busy to look at it now. Maybe they are putting a fair degree of trust into you. Maybe they ...


0

It is not rude but I t would be better if you replied to them as confirmation you received their wishes it will be nice but in separate email or separate slack message.


0

I wouldn't say you're against favoritism, as much as, for whatever reason, your manager appears to dislike you. Of course, from your point of view, it's same difference, but just setting the record straight. More to the point, I don't see what/how you can make things better for yourself, other than entertaining the competing offers you say you're getting. ...


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