306

telling someone “your 6 months work will be a total waste” is not easy Don't think of it as a waste, try to look at it as an opportunity. Ultimately you won't be required to deliver (but I would absolutely plan to, just in case), but you still need to be delivering something, so to me this seems like a perfect opportunity to experiment with things you ...


200

The simplest way is just don't answer his calls when you're on leave. If something really important comes up he can email. I don't answer calls from anyone whose number I don't recognise or don't want to talk to.


141

I suspect you're not going to like this answer, but I'm going to write it anyway: you are part of the problem. X was harassed and there was enough evidence for your employer to terminate M's employment. You are now attempting to use the fact that M was a bad person as a reason to avoid having X on your team. There's a term for that, and it is victim blaming. ...


124

Make sure it's okay per company policy and HR. (It would be wise to give HR the heads up that you're putting it in the break room). Then leave the fundraiser box in the break room, with an indication on what organisation the fundraising is for. (But not you or your children's names). If you're concerned about your reports feeling pressure to "donate", don'...


107

I believe this is a bad idea. A team leader should not put members of their team in a situation to even have to think about this scenario. If even one person on your team feels compelled to donate (and you may never know this was the case), then you may have harmed the relationship with that employee. Is the amount of money your candy fundraiser generates ...


99

It sounds to me like you're coddling an underperforming employee. Anxiety and lack of self esteem are not reasons to allow an employee be unproductive and picky with their tasks. You aren't equipped or trained to treat self-esteem issues. Sit down with him, discuss what the road blocks are, and brainstorm ways to move forward. You should not allow him to ...


88

I agree with cdkMoose and would add another choice: buy the candy yourself and anonymously put it in the break room for others to take at no cost.


85

I have already decided I'm leaving the company since I really don't find any reason to try to make him learn how to value others. He is a senior and if he cannot understand this simple thing by now, I don't think he will change now. My question is, should I raise an issue to his boss while I am still in the company? No. Take the high road here. ...


56

Stop calling it a failure The project is going to end earlier than intended due to factors that have nothing to do with you or your company. That’s not a failure. It’s also bizarre to think that getting paid 3x for the effort of x is a failure. That sounds like the kind of success a lot of people would like to have. What the customer does with your demo ...


56

I think you're approaching this the wrong way. The expert developers who come for meeting but when they find this is a new company and there is no other member teams, they give up and leave, and the main thing they say is "we prefer to work for a famous company with big teams" ... why would they? You're asking them to not work at a stable company, ...


55

I am concerned Great, you are telling us what you are concerned about! Let's go through it. because I see the first step (going directly to the HR bypassing the internal procedure and the chain of command) as a potential sign of anarchy, disrespect for the superiors and allergy to the rules. Anarchy? Seriously? It should give you pause that apparently, HR ...


55

On being a "bad cop" As was mentioned before, the way to go is detaching yourself or any person for that matter from the issues to be raised. This means: Your rules need to be clear and written down, be it in a wiki, a styleguide, company documents, whatever you are using. This material must be accessible to the dev in question. When pointing out ...


54

Calling you on the day of your uncle's funeral was egregious, whether he knew of it or not. As such, it can be used to drive the point home. You don’t say if you have already discussed his calling on your off-days or not. In either case, now is the time for a serious conversation. Something like: I don't work on my off-days, so, obviously the status of ...


52

What you are being asked to produce is a really impressive proof-of-concept demo. You've been hired by Party A. They're hiring you, in effect, to produce something that makes them look good - that they can point to and say "look at this awesome thing we were building". That's the actual customer intent, and you have 6 months to produce something that will ...


50

I have some experience with this from the other side. We did not have much pairing when rebuilding our Kubernetes infrastructure recently. The person who built most of the new infrastructure is now on parental leave every other week for the rest of the year. Every time they are gone we have to scramble to solve problems. This means we are losing development ...


48

If there are that many mistakes in the code, maybe a code review is too late to catch them. Maybe you need to take a step back. There are some alternative approaches you could take: Training. Doesn't have to be a course. Could be a book, a video series, an exercise site. Personalized guidance. Instead of repeatedly pointing out the same mistakes in code ...


43

Though the common consensus is "no, might look bad on you" in other answers already given, I disagree. I think you should voice the reason why you're leaving. No need to shout it from the roof-tops, but your boss (senior developers' superior at least) has to know. Why? I had a PR with a month's work. He squash-merged the PR in his own pc, so all the code ...


38

"I know I'm failing him as a leader" I think you are doing really great according to your actions and go further than a lot of managers I've experienced in my last 20 years in the IT-industry. "..and what did you do to get things back on track?" We once had this issue with a long-term intern in our company working on minor tasks of our flagship-product....


33

The code reviewer is supposed to be the "bad cop". That's your job. If you feel like a "bad cop", that's a good thing and you should embrace it. That said... Junior developers make a lot of mistakes. Pointing them all out is exhausting, frustrating, and demoralizing. If they e.g. name a variable wrong, or they use a linear search ...


28

If you have been hired to lead a team and then the whole team gets fired and not replaced, that sounds like a pretty valid reason to leave. You could not fulfill the role you were hired for without a team, after all.


25

There's one thing that seems to be missing in the steps you said you did: Evaluate his skills, and based on that, what tasks he can do. If needed, if his skills include some that you're not proficient at, find other employees, senior ones whom you can trust, to evaluate his skill level. Based on that, estimate whether there is a place for him at all, or ...


25

I'm the developer you want. I've been a part of large companies (FB, Amazon) and 5 startups, 4 of which sold. I was a lead at several of them. So I'll tell you what I would want to come to work for another young startup: I want a salary. I can't work for nothing. I'm willing to take a bit less than a big company would pay me, but I want something in ...


25

The answer is kinda mean, but... everything's lining up on the "go all out on enforcement" boat, as much as I hate to look at it that way. I mean, you've said: He "produces low-quality code" (even apart from style differences) The things you've already let slide have cost your other developers unneeded time. He's "very inexperienced&...


24

I am concerned because I see the first step (going directly to the HR bypassing the internal procedure and the chain of command) as a potential sign of anarchy, disrespect for the superiors and allergy to the rules. Like it or not, these are the new rules. A victim of sexual harassment has every right to avoid the chain of command and go directly to HR. ...


22

Aside from correcting him in front of others to claim credit for it, there really is not a lot that you can do. You said you're leaving the company? In time it will become evident to others when "his" productivity goes down. Personally, I would not go out of my way to make waves, but quietly move on.


20

I think you are focusing to much on the term in a programming sense. By working with another, you can teach and learn from each other. For example, early in my IT career, I was a sales engineer for a software product. I was "paired" with a salesperson. We would travel to potential customers to sell them the product. He focused on selling and I focused ...


19

If that's your greatest concern at the office, I'd seriously consider trying to become a lifer. There is nothing unprofessional or improper about referring to employees as employees. "Team" is just a term that popped up as an management tool to "make employees feel more empowered". Quit getting offended at nothing or that attitude will bleed out, and you'...


18

Let's take out the skills set out of the equation. Maybe that X person actually had a real problem with M, which would make sense with most of the arguments you said. In this case, and no matter what, I don't see why you should be "worried". X went to HR because something with M made them feel uncomfortable enough to think that the problem needed ...


17

I think you need to involve HR (am I really saying that? :-) ) in a formal review process. A manipulator is at work here. A few serious red flags here (and not your fault at all). he'd tried to deliver the work package we'd agreed upon, but that he'd hit a dead end and was giving up. That's not his choice. You agreed a goal and he can't just opt out (...


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