305

telling someone “your 6 months work will be a total waste” is not easy Don't think of it as a waste, try to look at it as an opportunity. Ultimately you won't be required to deliver (but I would absolutely plan to, just in case), but you still need to be delivering something, so to me this seems like a perfect opportunity to experiment with things you ...


204

The simplest way is just don't answer his calls when you're on leave. If something really important comes up he can email. I don't answer calls from anyone whose number I don't recognise or don't want to talk to.


124

Make sure it's okay per company policy and HR. (It would be wise to give HR the heads up that you're putting it in the break room in any case). Then leave the fundraiser box in the break room, with an indication on what organisation the fundraising is for. (But not you or your children's names). If you're concerned about your reports feeling pressure to "...


105

I believe this is a bad idea. A team leader should not put members of their team in a situation to even have to think about this scenario. If even one person on your team feels compelled to donate (and you may never know this was the case), then you may have harmed the relationship with that employee. Is the amount of money your candy fundraiser generates ...


97

It sounds to me like you're coddling an underperforming employee. Anxiety and lack of self esteem are not reasons to allow an employee be unproductive and picky with their tasks. You aren't equipped or trained to treat self-esteem issues. Sit down with him, discuss what the road blocks are, and brainstorm ways to move forward. You should not allow him to ...


88

I agree with cdkMoose and would add another choice: buy the candy yourself and anonymously put it in the break room for others to take at no cost.


85

I have already decided I'm leaving the company since I really don't find any reason to try to make him learn how to value others. He is a senior and if he cannot understand this simple thing by now, I don't think he will change now. My question is, should I raise an issue to his boss while I am still in the company? No. Take the high road here. ...


56

Stop calling it a failure The project is going to end earlier than intended due to factors that have nothing to do with you or your company. That’s not a failure. It’s also bizarre to think that getting paid 3x for the effort of x is a failure. That sounds like the kind of success a lot of people would like to have. What the customer does with your demo ...


53

Calling you on the day of your uncle's funeral was egregious, whether he knew of it or not. As such, it can be used to drive the point home. You don’t say if you have already discussed his calling on your off-days or not. In either case, now is the time for a serious conversation. Something like: I don't work on my off-days, so, obviously the status of ...


51

What you are being asked to produce is a really impressive proof-of-concept demo. You've been hired by Party A. They're hiring you, in effect, to produce something that makes them look good - that they can point to and say "look at this awesome thing we were building". That's the actual customer intent, and you have 6 months to produce something that will ...


43

Though the common consensus is "no, might look bad on you" in other answers already given, I disagree. I think you should voice the reason why you're leaving. No need to shout it from the roof-tops, but your boss (senior developers' superior at least) has to know. Why? I had a PR with a month's work. He squash-merged the PR in his own pc, so all the code ...


38

"I know I'm failing him as a leader" I think you are doing really great according to your actions and go further than a lot of managers I've experienced in my last 20 years in the IT-industry. "..and what did you do to get things back on track?" We once had this issue with a long-term intern in our company working on minor tasks of our flagship-product....


25

There's one thing that seems to be missing in the steps you said you did: Evaluate his skills, and based on that, what tasks he can do. If needed, if his skills include some that you're not proficient at, find other employees, senior ones whom you can trust, to evaluate his skill level. Based on that, estimate whether there is a place for him at all, or ...


23

Aside from correcting him in front of others to claim credit for it, there really is not a lot that you can do. You said you're leaving the company? In time it will become evident to others when "his" productivity goes down. Personally, I would not go out of my way to make waves, but quietly move on.


20

There will be the possibility that some of your developers are working for you because they want to make a difference - but in reality, most people just want to be working hard on something they're good at and given a paycheck for it. Nothing you do will really solve the problem for those who "actually care" about releasing the end product (i.e. work for ...


19

If that's your greatest concern at the office, I'd seriously consider trying to become a lifer. There is nothing unprofessional or improper about referring to employees as employees. "Team" is just a term that popped up as an management tool to "make employees feel more empowered". Quit getting offended at nothing or that attitude will bleed out, and you'...


18

I think you need to involve HR (am I really saying that? :-) ) in a formal review process. A manipulator is at work here. A few serious red flags here (and not your fault at all). he'd tried to deliver the work package we'd agreed upon, but that he'd hit a dead end and was giving up. That's not his choice. You agreed a goal and he can't just opt out (...


16

1) Try to identify re-usable components, or overlapping elements which could benefit your other projects. This could provide you with time to develop something which saves money, improves quality, or reduces technical debt. 2) Frame the project in phases. Phase 1 being the demo in 6 months, phase 2 being the complete product in 18 months. Focus purely in ...


14

He is in the wrong legally and morally Yes, he is. You should destroy these documents without reading them, and inform to him that you've done so. You should absolutely not use them in any way, shape or form, and you should absolutely file this chain of events (including the above actions) with upper management, so it's abundantly clear you did the correct ...


13

tl;dr: It's heavily culture dependent, but not mentioning it is a selfish decision. That does not make it the wrong decision, but be aware that it's definitely the selfish decision. Bringing it up as a "this is what I felt and for this reason I felt like we didn't function well as a team"-type of statement seems fairly safe and worth the minimal risk (...


13

I'm going to post an auxiliary answer that might highlight why you have to be especially careful with this sort of thing. I work for a company that has a very cozy relationship with United Way. A lot of the top executives have connections with people that serve on the United Way board. We don't merely do a pledge drive - we're given all sorts of work ...


13

My son has anxiety, among other things, and exhibits many of the same behaviors as your employee. I have some insights I think will help. His self esteem is largely because he isn't finishing things. When you let him not finish something, it reinforces that you also think he isn't capable. He is probably capable, he just needs a strategy for getting past ...


12

Sometimes it is not worth it. I am sure you can make better use of your skills somewhere else rather than dealing with a team that does not even want you there in the first place. Why would you want to be part of a project that is doomed to fail? Or, put in your own words, go pick a different battle! Anyway, if you are asking this question, I assume ...


12

I had to do an all-hands on this once when we had let things get out of control with everyone using their own tools. People couldn't take over from each other, even something as simple as writing up some notes was leading to tool time with people having to install readers and whatnot for each other's weird file formats and I finally "clicked" on the key ...


12

Talking with people often hinges on understanding their goal. It seems to me that while your main goal is to produce good software right now your manager wants a to invest some of the present expertise to train the juniors so that there will be more good developers in the future. As you know very well, educating younger colleagues takes time and the tasks ...


12

How do we deal with employees who behave in this way, i.e. demanding that they implement the idea they came up with, rather than the person we find best suitable? I think that asking to lead the idea they came with is different from asking credit or recognition for such idea. Credit or recognition should be given to the one that came up with the idea, in ...


12

I would go a different approach. Of course you don't want to be bothered in your off time, but not answering the phone or telling him to stop calling you doesn't solve the underlying problem: Your team manager propably has no idea of what you are doing. Of course he could ask, but he is propably busy, maybe overloaded so he doesn't have the time for that ...


11

Adding onto @tddmonkey's answer, here are some things that could be worked on over the next six months. Habits and tools These are some things which initially take a time investment, but pay off long term. Given that the project will be scrapped, this is a great opportunity to make the time investment without worrying about negatively impact productivity: ...


10

From your description the person you are calling "puppy" hasn't done anything untoward to you or your coworkers. Since they haven't actually done anything to you, referring to him as "puppy" makes you sound petty, and unprofessional. I'd advise you to knock it off. The real problem seems to be with your manager and their favoritism. Tackling your manager ...


9

You don't. The main reason being that you don't seem to think that some people should stick to fixing bugs, you seem to think that only the most qualified people should be developing. my manager and I have different expectations of good developers. You can't only have 10s employees. You need 7s-8s to keep up with things. It's up to you how you use the ...


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