294

telling someone “your 6 months work will be a total waste” is not easy Don't think of it as a waste, try to look at it as an opportunity. Ultimately you won't be required to deliver (but I would absolutely plan to, just in case), but you still need to be delivering something, so to me this seems like a perfect opportunity to experiment with things you ...


85

I have already decided I'm leaving the company since I really don't find any reason to try to make him learn how to value others. He is a senior and if he cannot understand this simple thing by now, I don't think he will change now. My question is, should I raise an issue to his boss while I am still in the company? No. Take the high road here. ...


53

Stop calling it a failure The project is going to end earlier than intended due to factors that have nothing to do with you or your company. That’s not a failure. It’s also bizarre to think that getting paid 3x for the effort of x is a failure. That sounds like the kind of success a lot of people would like to have. What the customer does with your demo ...


46

What you are being asked to produce is a really impressive proof-of-concept demo. You've been hired by Party A. They're hiring you, in effect, to produce something that makes them look good - that they can point to and say "look at this awesome thing we were building". That's the actual customer intent, and you have 6 months to produce something that will ...


42

Though the common consensus is "no, might look bad on you" in other answers already given, I disagree. I think you should voice the reason why you're leaving. No need to shout it from the roof-tops, but your boss (senior developers' superior at least) has to know. Why? I had a PR with a month's work. He squash-merged the PR in his own pc, so all the code ...


23

Aside from correcting him in front of others to claim credit for it, there really is not a lot that you can do. You said you're leaving the company? In time it will become evident to others when "his" productivity goes down. Personally, I would not go out of my way to make waves, but quietly move on.


21

There will be the possibility that some of your developers are working for you because they want to make a difference - but in reality, most people just want to be working hard on something they're good at and given a paycheck for it. Nothing you do will really solve the problem for those who "actually care" about releasing the end product (i.e. work for ...


19

If that's your greatest concern at the office, I'd seriously consider trying to become a lifer. There is nothing unprofessional or improper about referring to employees as employees. "Team" is just a term that popped up as an management tool to "make employees feel more empowered". Quit getting offended at nothing or that attitude will bleed out, and you'...


16

1) Try to identify re-usable components, or overlapping elements which could benefit your other projects. This could provide you with time to develop something which saves money, improves quality, or reduces technical debt. 2) Frame the project in phases. Phase 1 being the demo in 6 months, phase 2 being the complete product in 18 months. Focus purely in ...


14

He is in the wrong legally and morally Yes, he is. You should destroy these documents without reading them, and inform to him that you've done so. You should absolutely not use them in any way, shape or form, and you should absolutely file this chain of events (including the above actions) with upper management, so it's abundantly clear you did the correct ...


13

tl;dr: It's heavily culture dependent, but not mentioning it is a selfish decision. That does not make it the wrong decision, but be aware that it's definitely the selfish decision. Bringing it up as a "this is what I felt and for this reason I felt like we didn't function well as a team"-type of statement seems fairly safe and worth the minimal risk (...


12

Sometimes it is not worth it. I am sure you can make better use of your skills somewhere else rather than dealing with a team that does not even want you there in the first place. Why would you want to be part of a project that is doomed to fail? Or, put in your own words, go pick a different battle! Anyway, if you are asking this question, I assume ...


12

Talking with people often hinges on understanding their goal. It seems to me that while your main goal is to produce good software right now your manager wants a to invest some of the present expertise to train the juniors so that there will be more good developers in the future. As you know very well, educating younger colleagues takes time and the tasks ...


12

How do we deal with employees who behave in this way, i.e. demanding that they implement the idea they came up with, rather than the person we find best suitable? I think that asking to lead the idea they came with is different from asking credit or recognition for such idea. Credit or recognition should be given to the one that came up with the idea, in ...


10

From your description the person you are calling "puppy" hasn't done anything untoward to you or your coworkers. Since they haven't actually done anything to you, referring to him as "puppy" makes you sound petty, and unprofessional. I'd advise you to knock it off. The real problem seems to be with your manager and their favoritism. Tackling your manager ...


10

I had to do an all-hands on this once when we had let things get out of control with everyone using their own tools. People couldn't take over from each other, even something as simple as writing up some notes was leading to tool time with people having to install readers and whatnot for each other's weird file formats and I finally "clicked" on the key ...


10

Adding onto @tddmonkey's answer, here are some things that could be worked on over the next six months. Habits and tools These are some things which initially take a time investment, but pay off long term. Given that the project will be scrapped, this is a great opportunity to make the time investment without worrying about negatively impact productivity: ...


9

Both sides made mistakes, but it won't help you that your employer made mistakes. Often small or young companies are not good at training new hires. You should have learned during your free time in the office. You joined in January and you are stating yourself that you didn't have much to do, then why didn't you start looking at documentation and ...


9

Companies and organizations cancel projects all of the time. That doesn't negate your work, the value of your work, the experience you gain from that work, nor the money you earn from that work. The difference here is that you know beforehand that the project will be cancelled. I would fill the team in but I wouldn't present it as a failure, because it isn'...


9

Give it to them straight. Trying to soften this won't be doing them any favors. The facts are what they are - they're still expected to produce something functional. It doesn't matter that this might affect morale - if this is really "neither the first time nor the last", this is a reality they they need to face head on as soon as possible. However, be ...


8

You don't. The main reason being that you don't seem to think that some people should stick to fixing bugs, you seem to think that only the most qualified people should be developing. my manager and I have different expectations of good developers. You can't only have 10s employees. You need 7s-8s to keep up with things. It's up to you how you use the ...


8

So you want to keep a confidence, but if you do the company might tank and you fear for your job. It is impossible to fully satisfy both objectives, but that doesn't mean you have to give up an objective entirely. Perhaps a compromise might be found that gives both the company, and your friends, a fair chance? For instance, you could mention to the CEO ...


8

Late answer, so I'll link first then add my bits Asking to lead/participate is different from just asking for credit. Asking to lead, not to participate may be unreasonable from the employee depending on context. DarkCygnus has already answered this perfectly. Ideas are work. Some are trivial, some are the result of experimentation, experience and careful ...


8

Don't be shy on a resume. It's where you should be bragging about those experiences that best demonstrate your capabilities. If you were employed as an intern for the full duration of your time (your title never formally changed), then list the position as an internship and detail your activities in your description of the position. If you're now an owner ...


6

The team lead should define which tools are preferred but only enforce them when real issues arise. Having led teams at different organizations, I would suggest encouraging team members to use the same tools for the sake of efficient collaboration and hand-off. Given that you have a team of consultants and the member in question is off-site, I would be even ...


6

If the company is making a mark-up of 200%, one way to motivate your developers is to offer them some of that, surely? Say, an extra month's pay on acceptance of the sham product if (as expected) it gets cancelled after six months. You could even give them the option not to participate in the work, but I doubt that there would be many takers.


6

Keeping it secret is not an option, people will find out. If they learn that you are keeping secrets from them, they will really be demotivated. So the question becomes how to tell them, rather than if. You are obliged to deliver a "demo" in six months. Is there any reason that "demo" can't be a working, useful system? It will obviously not have all the ...


5

My question is, should I raise an issue to his boss while I am still in the company? No- that's not your job and could actually backfire on you/make you look bad depending on how the boss interprets the information prior to you leaving. I would quietly leave and move on to better opportunities. There are always coworkers who we do not like to work with, ...


5

This sounds like a misunderstanding. If he speaks in english as a native german it is his misunderstanding, if he speaks in german it's probably yours. Referring to people as "Mitarbeiter" literally translated means co-worker but can also mean employee, especially if introducing to a third party who knows he is the owner or upper management. The literal ...


5

Counting software languages might be nice for the ego, but irrelevant for this question unless all of them are in use on the same project (in which case, Excel is not your issue). If your consultant uses his Excel tool for his own use, then let him. If he insists on everyone else using it, then give him a big resounding 'NO'. You already have a tool that ...


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