338

You seem to be confusing two things: Them working any amount of hours to meet unexpected or unplanned issues. Them being responsible and providing quality work in a predictable way. Ownership is not about the team working the whole night to fit your promises to customers. Ownership is about knowing what's in the code, how it works, having a plan and being ...


276

I was wondering if this is a safe topic of conversation in a one to one meeting with my team lead. This behavior is an acceptable topic, jumping to conclusion as to the cause isn't. I would come at it along the lines of: Hey boss. I've noticed lately that when I present technical info about the project you always confirm it with Adam or Bob yet when ...


272

If you reveal it publicly (that is, everyone knows you have trained your peers) not only will you be more productive, but your whole team will be, and management will know why. By advancing the interests of the team and the company, you will be seen as someone making an important contribution. You're more likely to be promoted (for example, to team lead) or ...


257

Generally you want to avoid expressing out and out preferences for this sort of thing in a CV but instead make obvious that the company will get the best results by giving you what you want, you're on this lines already but due to the language barrier it doesn't flow quite right. I'd put it something like this: Social skills: Experienced working in teams ...


251

I recommend bringing this up with your colleague, not your boss. Even though you think your code is superior, it might be you're missing out on some specific details, or there are situations you didn't think about (bigger picture). When you talk to your colleague explain the situation: you used code as a quick fix and it's giving different results than your ...


241

I would focus on her productivity, not her individual actions. If her productivity is reasonable, then let it go. It's her process of getting more done at other times. If her productivity is low, whether you think it is a result of her chatting or not, address that directly. Have a talk with her about her lower than expected productivity, what is holding ...


203

If the designer doesn't want to e-mail you, you can take down notes when you're on the phone and then send him an e-mail with what you discussed. Hello Designer, As per our discussion I will start working on X, Y. The phrasing above might not fly in South East Asia, which I'm guessing you're from, but you get the idea. This is good practice for people ...


202

Of course your management doesn't think you need more people, you have people who are clearly not busy. Never do someone else's work over for them. Miss the deadline and send it back. Every time. You are incentivising them to perform poorly. Stop it. Eventually they will get better or get fired. As far as you own actual workload. Learn to say no. When you ...


188

You actually ARE in a position to change this. You lead by example. You can start using version control locally for your changes. You can simply 'commit' everyone else change at the same time. You will always be able to recover previous versions and compare things to prior versions. You can also offer to do this for the company. Setting up version ...


185

management says employees should pay for such events Sadly your management is clueless. They are the ones who desire increasing engagement of employees. They are the ones who will have something to gain from such increased engagement. Thus any company event must be paid for by the company. I know it really boils down to willingness to participate in ...


184

What do I tell any person if they ask me how I did whatever I did? You show them what you did. Ideally, you teach them how to do it without you. When you do that, you'll build a great reputation as someone to go to for help. Rather than diluting your value to the company, you're actually increasing it. Companies value team players who help everyone get ...


175

To distill the story down to its core elements: the employee is a new, junior member of the team; a senior team member asked for help preparing a presentation; the specific request is objectionable. How the employee responds should depend on the way the request is objectionable: If she doesn't know how to perform the task, she should say so and ask for a ...


164

Here's the secret: Stop working above your role. You're a developer. The assignment of resources and negotiations outside your department is NOT your role. It is your manager's, and he is executing it. Your manager is doing things very well, from what I can see. He's preparing you for what's happening soon. Your job is to be ready. First and foremost,...


153

Give him this picture. (The White dot is under the "i" in "him" - it’s Actually visible!) This is 1000x1000 all black pixel image with a single white pixel.


143

tl;dr This is not a technical problem it's a people problem. Treat it as such. I ain't changin' anything! You are off to a really bad start and it has nothing to do with the code. It sounds like your people skills are lacking. You don't start charging into a new job telling the current team how bad they are. People don't like change. And they really don'...


141

I think you'd best get some kind of professional (medical) diagnosis for this. It is a lot easier to go to your boss with a medical term that they can, to some extent, relate to and appreciate, rather than a vague description that they might just think means "he feels lazy some days, and wants my permission to slack off".


138

I suggest you put the question up for discussion to the team. Present your concerns at the next team meeting and ask what they think about them. Since they sound like valid concerns I would imagine you'll get support from the other developers. Make sure the discussion stays professional and keep an opened mind. Focus on how using X affects the rest of the ...


135

If he keeps behaving this way, you will have to confront him. Here's something you can try: "It's time for you to drop this. I know it's terribly amusing for you but I consider flirting with co-workers to be very unprofessional and I have no intention of doing anything. Please stop embarrassing me in public."


134

The way to handle a request like that is to understand what the "customer" wants, and to ignore their implementation suggestions (in consulting, it's important to understand the difference between requirements and suggestions). The "customer" wants a visual of "one in a million" in their PowerPoint presentation. The "customer" suggests drawing a million ...


134

Deadlines are always met and the customer is very happy This is what matters. I know you want to feel like you know your teams strengths and weaknesses as a manager since that's your job, to manage the resources at your disposal however if everything is working out and your team is getting the job done, I would just leave it the way it is. The only ...


131

I'm assuming that you are the manager of that team? Then I'm sorry, but from what you wrote, you seem to be a big part of the problem. If something goes wrong and a task doesn't get done because everyone thought someone else was doing it, then the reaction of the manager in charge shouldn't be "sigh, now finish the project [and leave me alone]", but rather ...


125

Professional team-building is more than a few co-workers having a good time together. It is designed with specific goals in mind. The event might encourage people from different departments to mingle and talk socially, before they are expected to work together professionally. If people are left to their own devices, they would mostly talk to people they ...


123

First of all, objectively present the situation to your team: Guys, we have been nominated for an innovation award, however only 6 of us, myself included, can attend this event. Next, tell them when and where the event is taking place, and ask who is interested in attending: The event is taking place at Restaurant X, on October Y, at Z PM. Who is ...


123

Even when I told him I needed it now, he said he had something else to do and sneaked off when I was not there. Today, there is a critical bug and this senior guy said the same thing again - "I can't finish it today. I have a meeting with friends and I have to go." then he sneaked out while I was talking to my manager. In both of these examples, you ...


119

This kind of person thrives on the idea that you are uncomfortable with his behaviour, and confronting him simply confirms to him that he is getting a response. Simply ignore it - if in the middle of the conversation or meeting, just continue as if the guy has not said anything at all. Otherwise, steer to a professional conversation. This person will stop ...


115

If it's a one-time thing, do the testing. Your team needs you. QA is drowning. Take over some of their workload and stay in contact with them to make sure you do the job, and you do it well. After having proven yourself as someone who can be relied on in a pinch, you can then tell your manager man do I hate manual testing, and maybe they'll keep that in ...


109

Should I let management know that I consider leaving the company due to these practices? Never say directly that you are thinking of leaving - as soon as management know that you're not committed to the company, that always puts you at risk of being out of a job without a new one to go to. Or at least let them know that I am growing quite frustrated? ...


104

I agree with almost all points given in Kate Gregory's answer but would suggest two minor changes: First, I would not say "make me a lot faster than the rest of the team" (even in case it's true). I would go with "increase my productivity significantly". Second, I am not the biggest fan of "lunch and learn" (even if it counts as worktime) because many ...


103

Yes, it would be rude and unprofessional to tell them to do their own docs. First of all, if you are a junior consultant, you do generally need to accept that at times you are likely to get stuck covering grunt work as the experienced engineers are going to be tied up with developing the project. As a junior you simply can't be as productive as they will ...


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