339

You seem to be confusing two things: Them working any amount of hours to meet unexpected or unplanned issues. Them being responsible and providing quality work in a predictable way. Ownership is not about the team working the whole night to fit your promises to customers. Ownership is about knowing what's in the code, how it works, having a plan and being ...


272

If you reveal it publicly (that is, everyone knows you have trained your peers) not only will you be more productive, but your whole team will be, and management will know why. By advancing the interests of the team and the company, you will be seen as someone making an important contribution. You're more likely to be promoted (for example, to team lead) or ...


188

You actually ARE in a position to change this. You lead by example. You can start using version control locally for your changes. You can simply 'commit' everyone else change at the same time. You will always be able to recover previous versions and compare things to prior versions. You can also offer to do this for the company. Setting up version ...


138

I suggest you put the question up for discussion to the team. Present your concerns at the next team meeting and ask what they think about them. Since they sound like valid concerns I would imagine you'll get support from the other developers. Make sure the discussion stays professional and keep an opened mind. Focus on how using X affects the rest of the ...


134

Deadlines are always met and the customer is very happy This is what matters. I know you want to feel like you know your teams strengths and weaknesses as a manager since that's your job, to manage the resources at your disposal however if everything is working out and your team is getting the job done, I would just leave it the way it is. The only ...


131

I'm assuming that you are the manager of that team? Then I'm sorry, but from what you wrote, you seem to be a big part of the problem. If something goes wrong and a task doesn't get done because everyone thought someone else was doing it, then the reaction of the manager in charge shouldn't be "sigh, now finish the project [and leave me alone]", but rather ...


123

Even when I told him I needed it now, he said he had something else to do and sneaked off when I was not there. Today, there is a critical bug and this senior guy said the same thing again - "I can't finish it today. I have a meeting with friends and I have to go." then he sneaked out while I was talking to my manager. In both of these examples, you ...


115

If it's a one-time thing, do the testing. Your team needs you. QA is drowning. Take over some of their workload and stay in contact with them to make sure you do the job, and you do it well. After having proven yourself as someone who can be relied on in a pinch, you can then tell your manager man do I hate manual testing, and maybe they'll keep that in ...


110

Should I let management know that I consider leaving the company due to these practices? Never say directly that you are thinking of leaving - as soon as management know that you're not committed to the company, that always puts you at risk of being out of a job without a new one to go to. Or at least let them know that I am growing quite frustrated? ...


104

I agree with almost all points given in Kate Gregory's answer but would suggest two minor changes: First, I would not say "make me a lot faster than the rest of the team" (even in case it's true). I would go with "increase my productivity significantly". Second, I am not the biggest fan of "lunch and learn" (even if it counts as worktime) because many ...


100

We learn not to yell at other people at our mother's knees. This is not acceptable behavior anywhere in public, let alone in a professional setting, and she's probably well aware of it. Anyone older than 6 or so should be. Your coworker seems to be accustomed to getting a pass on this behavior (for various reasons not worth discussing here), and speaking ...


93

Something I want to make clear first: dealing with coworkers, attitude during meetings, respecting someone senior... These are all things that fall under an employee's performance. It's not just the actual work they do, but their behavior and their relationship with colleagues and higher ups are areas where the manager has the authority (and even the ...


92

How can I handle the risk to the project presented by X? To address this, I am going to use your own words: it's evolving fast / unstable - on going to document some older code, he found some base functionality had been removed, wouldn't compile in newer versions, so took a couple of days to re-implement it AND the other devs are clearly ...


91

Scot Adams coined the term "blamestorming" and this is a living breathing example. It's purely a cultural problem, and can be solved with changing the tone a bit. The only way to stop it is to stigmatize it. A little bit of sloganeering can go a long way. THE HARD SELL I'm not interested in excuses, I'm interested in solutions If you don't have any ...


90

I am really not sure what I must do. Since you are their manager, you must manage the team. That means managing the existing team and the new hires both. It appears that you haven't gotten to the bottom of what's going on, but are instead reacting to just rumors and complaints. So it's time to dig in. Talk with this new hire. Talk with the team. Draw some ...


86

The worst thing you can do is keep it to yourself as she's already started badmouthing you to colleagues. Bring her behaviour to the attention of your manager. This may be paranoid, but it might be a good idea to start writing up your interactions with her, either in hardcopy or emails. Perhaps even avoid being alone with her in order to avoid a literal he-...


75

In my office we use to quote the following: “Poor planning on your part does not necessitate an emergency on mine.” In my experience developers often are motivated to help with a problem that appeared because of a mistake on their side or something unforeseen. But all to often issues arise that are not only unsurprising but predicted. Before you decide ...


70

I'd be very, very concerned about this. If he gets hit by a bus tomorrow, or decides to leave tomorrow, then you currently have: A massive cost, both time and money wise, of finding an expert in X to replace him; A team that doesn't understand any of the code he's written; A team that can't reliably even deploy any of the code he's written; Code that is ...


47

You claim lack of ownership by the team. Everything your developers build is owned by the company, not them. When you say that your employees should "own" the results of their work, does it also mean that they will receive the profits that those results make for the company? If it doesn't mean that, they don't truly own the work and you can not ask ownership ...


46

Welcome to my workday. Some issues are easy, some are tough, some you find immediately, others take weeks. I understand your stress as I suffer it as well. It's not fun to get up every daily and say yeah, I'm still on that bug, no progress.... You feel kinda stupid after 2-3 days. Here's my personal formula for getting over it. Keep notes. Write down your ...


44

I feel I don’t know who works for me, who works on which feature/bug/task and which are the roles and expertise of the member of the team Here are two things. One is that you don't know your team. This can be solved by simply asking them to meet. In Corpo linguo we call that "team building". Don't force, ask them to participate. Second things is that you ...


44

The first situation you describe (the Alice, Bob, and Charlie one) seems very different from the question you ask and the second situation (about avoiding decision making). The first situation seems like a clear management failure - one of the most primary aspects of manager's job is to make sure everyone on the team knows what they are supposed to be ...


43

Hard no. Pet languages, or even excessive numbers of languages, getting introduced into a project make it completely unmaintainable in the long term. When the developer leaves, you'll end up with the code in their pet language in whatever status they left it in, and a pile of workarounds in the other components to get things done without having to change ...


40

Working in software this is very common. You treat your people as professionals. You're talking ownership but then giving demands that a 'critical' bug must be fixed NOW. Is the bug actually 'critical'? Is it the result of unclear requirements? Our old friend 'scope-creep'? In each of these you (as the manager) need to manage expectations. Not every bug ...


39

Absolutely not! Entire companies have died because they picked the wrong language in which to write their codebase. If the language dies, becomes unpopular, or leads to intractable scalability issues, the code dies too. Can you afford to rewrite it? When you need to completely rewrite a piece of software in a different language, you will be a sitting ...


35

With the updated question, it is now clear that you are trying to fix the wrong problem. The senior engineer's behavior is a symptom of a fundamentally broken software development process and/or dysfunctional company. If you have critical bugs getting into production every month, then you have at least one of the following problems: Incompetent engineers ...


30

Are you having weekly one-on-ones with your direct reports? If not, you should be doing that. Even though it might be done via phone or skype, it is still a meeting, and you'll still start to get to know them better. My boss is in another state, and while I do visit at least once a year, I've found that having a one-on-one has helped me get to know him a ...


29

I want to make one additional point. Rushing out a bug fix often leads to technical debt. If your senior developer is questioning how it will be tested tonight then that is a good question that a senior developer should be asking! I’ve worked at places where urgency is prioritized over quality and this has had negative long term consequences. Ultimately, ...


29

This is an issue that you need to address. Feeling that there is something wrong when anyone but you solves a problem, or anyone but your turns out to be 'the best' in some particular circumstance is an emotional issue that is going to cause you problems in later life if you do not address it. Reacting like this is going to cause you problems, from ...


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