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There is a difference between Blame and Responsibility. One of the things you need to be very careful about when thinking and talking about these issues is to not conflate those two concepts. Blame is about finding someone to say is at fault, to associate a failure with. Responsibility is about owning future outcomes and making sure failure doesn't happen ...


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The more important question, I think, is how do your manager(s) feel about it? Do they appreciate you stepping up and taking some of the load off of them or do they think you’re overstepping your role and doing work outside of your purview. If your manager is happy, I wouldn’t worry about this co-worker. He probably wants a promotion as well and just doesn’t ...


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Any question that starts off with, How can I convince person X of ... is hard to answer, because none of us really know what motivates your boss. So, while we can provide ideas for specific arguments you can make, we can't really understand if those arguments will actually help or not. As you've noted, some bosses will reject what appears to you as a ...


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You won´t change the company culture over night! Let´s face it: you are 1 of 30 employees, most of them are probably used to or even liking the way it´s done now You are not in a position of power (Manager etc.) You are hired to do a different job (Development) You are fairly new to the company So the weight of your opinion is fairly small. Ask yourself ...


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“...2 man on the same job position...” Looks like one (or both of you) are assuming “Agile equals Pair Programming”. You need to clear that up on your next conversation about the topic. The primary thing that needs to be considered is the fit of your company’s operating model and the Agile implementation that you’re thinking of (XP, Scrum, etc). For ...


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Teamwork is usually not desired by the company itself but it's requested from the outside, namely the customer who buys the products. The interface to the external world is usually located in the marketing department. If the aim is to introduce teamwork for software development this is equal to let the marketing department control the technological decisions....


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Bring up the Bus Factor One person working on a bit of software means only one person knows the internal workings of that bit of software. What happens if that person gets hit by a bus? Leaves the company? Is fired effective immediately? Is ill? Is uncontactable during a crisis? Life happens, and reasons why a single person is no longer able to work on ...


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Also a project can only move further if the specific project developer is available. Depending on the years a developer worked in the company, it can happen, that 4 projects needs this one specific developer resource, if the clients make change requests. Find examples where this went wrong and give them to him. Also argue that if a developer leaves, all ...


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I am going to tackle this from the organizational side. The way this should be done, even for bugfixes, even for small ones, is via ticket/issue. If this was the case, make sure a person is assigned to a ticket and it is clear whether or not the ticket is currently in progress. Make sure to put a policy in place, in case you want multiple people to work on ...


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Your team needs to get organised better. Two people trying to fix the same problem is a waste of time. And the way you tell this story, it seems you don’t do code reviews - that’s something you ought to change. Apart from that: The bug is fixed, so what is the problem?


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Unless his fix is flawed you should thank him and move on. Even if the bug is in code you wrote, it's not really your bug nor is it your code. It is the company's code and the company's mission is to deploy that code without bugs. Your colleague is doing the company a favor by fixing bugs. It's great that you want to be responsible for all code you ...


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Study up on the topic of debate. There is plenty of online information out there, but you can go deeper and look at some of the theory behind it and different types of arguments, and/or when people are using non-arguments in rebuttal. Unfortunately, I'm finding many people don't have formal training in debate, as it is more of an extra-curricular activity ...


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You need to work on being more assertive, fight for your ideas (if you truly believe they're superior), and not allow yourself to be bullied, or pushed around. That's not something you'll learned overnight, and it may take years of practice until you learn to finesse these situations. I would start by quickly reading some books on assertiveness. There's ...


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You have a challenging situation. You feel like the "new people" can overpower you (and maybe the others), but this is based on perception. Then in your comments you mention that you are sometimes described as "over-assertive" but worry that is a misperception that the newcomers might assume is valid. Also, if you have experience and good ideas for long-term,...


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Suggest the use of brainwriting for your next planning meeting. Brainwriting is a brainstorming variant that was developed to deal with the issue of overly assertive individuals taking over and dominating planning meetings. It involves each member of the group being given a pack of sticky notes or other small pieces of paper, then spending a fixed amount ...


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