New answers tagged

1

Some things leapt out at me in the question: I'm the only designer there. There's one person for copy writing and one director who checks my designs. There are no senior designers and art directors. and: There should be an art director who can help the way I want (Again, I don't know much about their responsibilities much). Currently I'm handling ...


0

In top of the answers I think the problem is about confidence. your developer is confident of using X and afraid of using any other language he is not so good at. probably a training in the capabilities of your Y language may give him some confidence in using Y


-1

Consider the possibility that your developer (the one who really likes X) is on the autistic spectrum, or at least has autistic traits. The obsessive focus on one thing, talking about it all the time, may indicate that this person has some sort of condition, which makes it difficult for him to approach the matter objectively. The reason why I'm saying this ...


0

It sounds like your complaint is that you're doing a lot of work solo, without your colleagues actively contributing. A lack of collaboration is likely driven by combination of (a) your own behavior, (b) the processes of your team and (c) the attitudes of your colleagues. Put the greatest effort into what you directly control - your behavior. (a) Your own ...


1

I hate to say this, but I have to: Your question is off. If your company were a big company, like Amazon, Apple or Facebook, yes, the question makes perfect sense. You want to have a clear definition of your job role, you want to have some artists working with you so you can come up with better products. Unfortunately, you work for a start-up. Every start-...


4

No, language X itself is not really the problem. What you've described here are the symptoms of a much deeper problem that will affect all the other systems your team produces as well: the team isn't really working as a team but instead as a bunch of disconnected individuals. Your instinct that you "want [your] team to be autonomous and happy, building them ...


7

I think you're approaching the problem from the wrong perspective. You are turning it in our pet language vs. his pet language problem. Languages are only tools, quite universal one, so their choice is a side issue. The real problem is that you have a total chaos in team. It looks like everyone can do what he want, choosing any tool, even those he's ...


10

Is X itself the problem? No. X is not the problem... for every value of X This is a management problem. As a new manager, you landed a tough one. You problem is that you have a very enthusiastic programmer who you would like to redirect into a more productive employee. You suspect that if you tell him he can't use X you will have to replace him ...


1

You should make it obvious for the higher-ups and the team that X in its current state is a problem, because apparently there is currently no understanding that this is the case. Tell everyone that the team needs at least two X experts, in case one of them calls in sick. Ask for a training in X for the whole team. Every time the project breaks because of an ...


8

As others have said, this situation should not be allowed to continue. It does indeed sound like the fundamental answer is going to be of the form "No, sorry, you can't use X." And you are well within your rights to say that. Your worst case scenario is this dev gets upset and quits. That would be sad, but is his perogative and your answer should probably ...


2

Building on other answers, I agree that languages/technologies to be used in the project should be positively selected by the team before being used (excepting possibly a trial or test case for feasibility, with no promise or critical-path to be used in the project itself). I worry that that wasn't done, and trying to bring the topic up for discussion with ...


39

Absolutely not! Entire companies have died because they picked the wrong language in which to write their codebase. If the language dies, becomes unpopular, or leads to intractable scalability issues, the code dies too. Can you afford to rewrite it? When you need to completely rewrite a piece of software in a different language, you will be a sitting ...


44

Hard no. Pet languages, or even excessive numbers of languages, getting introduced into a project make it completely unmaintainable in the long term. When the developer leaves, you'll end up with the code in their pet language in whatever status they left it in, and a pile of workarounds in the other components to get things done without having to change ...


70

I'd be very, very concerned about this. If he gets hit by a bus tomorrow, or decides to leave tomorrow, then you currently have: A massive cost, both time and money wise, of finding an expert in X to replace him; A team that doesn't understand any of the code he's written; A team that can't reliably even deploy any of the code he's written; Code that is ...


1

I think you need to have a discussion with the team on this language. Let the developer to present the language first, hear the advantages the language can give as well as what disadvantages language has. Bring up your concerns about stability, compatibility, etc. Take a look on the track record of who developed the language (for example Microsoft is known ...


2

One of the funny things about being paid to think is that sometimes you still have parts of the job which require very little in the way of thinking. "A trained monkey could do this" is a thought you will tend to have in any high level job I've ever heard of (or held). By way of example, most leaders of a country spend a surprising amount of time shaking ...


0

Express the opportunity costs of you doing this kind of work. It's hard to accomplish, and given your role as the least senior person in your role in a small company I think it might not be realistic for you right now. I work in a similar role, and it's unfortunate but something like 60%-70% of applied statistical and data science work is data preparation ...


2

If you want to propose someone else takes on the work, you should have a specific proposal ready for your manager, including: What specific role on the team or at the company does the task belong to? What other tasks or responsibilities will you have capacity for if this task is assigned elsewhere (what new things will you be able to get done)? How will you ...


6

You've made several statements that seem self-answering. Your question seems to be, How do I ask my boss to get someone to help me manually enter and transfer numbers from one spread sheet to another? But you also said, I'm the least senior person in the company and, I'm the lowest in tier at the company because we're so small and, so he just ...


2

When faced with mind numbing xfer of data I always choose to write code. Code will reduce the number of mistakes and can include QC checks.


15

This is one of the few things were I think a manager should put his foot down and not give in. What the developer is doing will hurt the company in the long run. And it doesn't matter what X is -- all that matters is that your company does not have a lot of expertise in X, and it will be hard to attract expertise in X. Your developer is wrong that X is the ...


93

How can I handle the risk to the project presented by X? To address this, I am going to use your own words: it's evolving fast / unstable - on going to document some older code, he found some base functionality had been removed, wouldn't compile in newer versions, so took a couple of days to re-implement it AND the other devs are clearly ...


135

I suggest you put the question up for discussion to the team. Present your concerns at the next team meeting and ask what they think about them. Since they sound like valid concerns I would imagine you'll get support from the other developers. Make sure the discussion stays professional and keep an opened mind. Focus on how using X affects the rest of the ...


1

They are using me as Art Director + Graphic Designer Absolutely this. No one is in charge of direction and you lead the creative effort. They are expecting you to deal with things to the best of your ability, which means taking more creative direction and owning your results. This is par for the course for young startups-- people often wear many hats, ...


4

From a graphic designer with similar experience. A sole GD cannot be expected to produce a fresh/unique/outstanding project. You might get the odd idea here and there but the job burden is just to much to execute them. I would advise to look for, what I consider, red flags: are they giving you any feedback (and "fix it" "not like that" "something different" ...


7

Does your boss give you any feedback? If he did and you didn't follow the advice then it's kind of your fault but if he just said "No, its crap do it again" then you should probably find a new job. Also by what you have written it seems that your boss okays the concept but then rejects the final product, maybe try working on the concept a little longer ...


3

I do not know the design world so I will try to see this more as a project management situation. As a Graphic Designer in a digital marketing and design agency, do I have to deal with it, doesn't matter it's too bad for you and your self esteem? You will always deal with undecided people, your goal is to understand the need and find a work-around the ...


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