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0

You posted in the wrong section for this question which is why you are getting down voted. Although I do recommend using Java for Server side elements and learning CSS, HTML and JavaScript for the front end. You can connect the sever side to the databases if you want to brush up on using it. This is one of the best ways to make web application which can be ...


27

I suggest that you wrote down your cook experience and emphasize what you learn that you can use in your next position. We hired some candidates as a Junior Developer in past companies where I work that they were Cook for multiples years. They emphasize in their resume that they learn soft skills like team communication, planning, etc. because they are ...


9

Briefly mention that you were a cook but other than that do not go into detail unless you have your resume is looking bare then I suggest you talk about it just to show that you have had a professional career and not a 5 year break. Otherwise just keep your resume relevant to the jobs you are applying for.


4

That really depends. Did you just recently change fields? Are you fresh out of college? A potential employer may want to see the past 10 years of employment experience. If you're 22 and you've been in IT for a few years, it's not a big deal. If you're 32 and you've been a web developer for 2 years, they're going to want to know what you were ...


0

Be careful. I don't know where you live but I believe here in California anything related to your employer that you come up with, even if done on your own time, belongs to that employer. On several jobs I have started I have been required to list "previous inventions" so they know that anything I created while employed with them belongs to them. I once left ...


36

Talk to a lawyer first Make sure you understand the legal ramifications of any actions before talking with your employer. Do this ASAP. Research applicable company policies Does your company have a conflict of interest policy that prohibits employees from acting as vendors to the company? Make sure you know the rules. Decide what you're personally ok ...


1

Since you used your previous work to do the job and you own copyright for it, Tell them honestly about your findings, and Offer them to buy your previous work for an appropriate value. If you are/were planning to keep profiting from your knowledge, either Set the price to include your projected earnings from this data-as-a-service within a reasonable time ...


6

You have three routes open to you. Say you don't know how to solve the problem. Solve the problem and become a hero at your new company. Explain to your manager how you solved it, using your previous experience. Ask for advice about how to make sure you get corporate brownie point credit for it (patent application, recognition, promotion, bonus, that sort ...


50

Right now, my plan is to just pretend I too couldn't figure out how to do this task (remember this is a bonus "would be nice" task), because I don't want to provide my employer with my proprietary method and code that is worth, based on my past earnings from this former client alone, about USD $45k/year, and evidently more in some applications. Don'...


1

They are paying you for your skills and experience (Unless you join as fresher). So as per your experience, you should design and build the tool for them from scratch and don't give the code and your proprietary tool to them. That's how it happens when you leave an organization right, you take the experience and skills with you, not the code and tool which ...


0

Ift depends. It depends on the amount of maintenance you've got to do for each. I've been in a position to maintain, in a team of 2, 36 banking batches, some of them very old & very big. It worked. It worked, but most of them required my attention maybe once or twice for the 3 years I spent there. One of them, not even the biggest one, 50% of those 3 ...


0

I will answer per the OP question but also the following comment of OP : All things like documentation, customer support, preparing SRS do me and the intern. Actually, 90% of the work done by me since the intern developer just learning everything... But all design related works and support request, documentation related to design do other two designers. –...


1

Some remarks, from somebody who's done both jobs (but still loves and does dev). Make sure your current supervisor knows about your ambition to learn more work skill. Frame it as "more and better skills" rather than "I'm bored." You may get good advice and support from that direction. Product management / product owner work is really good work. It gives ...


6

There's a big difference between I've done active work on 15 different projects in the last 4 years I'm supposed to be working on 15 different projects right now. The area I'm in right now has 3 people, and we easily have more than 15 projects under our responsibility. But we're not actively working on all of them at any given point in time. In fact, we'...


1

You asked, What advice would you give to someone in my situation looking to get into a more technical role without a formal background for it? What options are there? All of the general advice about career changes would apply here, the fact that it's non-technical to technical is just a detail. Make sure you understand the field you're getting in to, ...


2

One really important challenge you'll face if you try to move your job title to "developer" is that you'll be moving from a relatively senior role into a junior one. You'll have/surpass many of the skills a senior developer needs in navigating the business, but to be a senior developer you'll need to learn most of the skills a developer uses when making ...


2

You asked, Is this a normal situation for software engineers? That's a tough question to answer without a lot of context - some software engineers may only have one or two projects that last years while others may do 15 or 20 projects in a given year. It's probably more typical for the latter to be the case in smaller companies where software is a means ...


2

Is this a normal situation for software engineers? Or is this the time for looking for new jobs? This is a sign both the company is growing and that you are growing expertise on the company software, and as such you are asked to handle a wider variety of task. For this part, it is "normal" as in to be expected if the company don't have the money/the ...


19

I have started around 7-8 projects in these 3 years and updated around 7-8 old projects also. So currently I have involved more than 15 projects. New requirements/ changes are coming each month for all old projects. So it is very hard to remember and working all projects together. All of these points to the fact that your company is seriously under-staffed. ...


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