240

If it was the CEO's decision to take away the work from home policy then HR is simply doing what they have been directed to do. If there is anyone that needs to be convinced it is the CEO. You can try to approach the CEO and explain the situation with this specific employee and see if they can make an exception. The problem with that, though, is that it ...


195

First, as a tip, try to mute your microphone unless you have to speak. That way you will minimize the noise the others in the meeting perceive. Now, given you are this baby's mother and it's perfectly natural to care for them and feed them, I don't think you have to ask for permission, nor do I think it's possible (or even legal) for them to forbid you to ...


191

Why do remote companies require working in the US? Those companies are likely based in the US and don't want to deal with the legal and tax complexities of having employees who live in multiple countries. It is complicated enough for some companies to deal with employees from various states within the US. Also having employees from around the world will ...


183

Simple answer - Move Out Move out. If you don't want to deal with your parents treating you like a child, you might have to move out to make this happen. It sounds like you have been working FT for several years, too, so are likely old enough this could happen. If you can't afford it currently start saving money like mad to be able to as soon as possible. ...


167

Does this request seem wrong? It makes me uncomfortable but I'm not sure it's really crossing a line. What do you think? I think the request is foolish. As a long time manager, I would never impose on anyone on my team that way. If the company was having financial difficulties, I'd just say "No" to the request to attend the conference, and not try to pass ...


155

What is in your contract? If there is no written contract, no problem. You just say thank you but no, thank you, that's not the deal we had, and walk away. Stress the part about meetings and completion date changes certainly not being what you agreed to. You have no obligation to respect deal you didn't make. If the contract you signed does not say a thing ...


153

From what I understand, here are my answers to your questions: Did I say anything wrong? In my opinion, yes: In asking for clarification on whether or not there was a program to do what the requester wanted, you ignored the strongly worded point of RP's message: that this is a dangerous change to make, and must be discussed with the manager. This ...


125

When you are missing a response from your boss, the very worst thing you can do is exactly what you did last time. They say that insanity is repeating the same action and expecting different results. So don't just send the same email or forward it with a meaningless intro like "still need an answer on this" or "any update?" You need to figure out (by asking,...


116

It sounds like your CEO has made a mandate and HR probably has their hands tied by it. The best way to deal with upper management's mandates is to make sure they fully understand the costs of them, and that they are consciously accepting those consequences. In your position, I would lay out the facts to HR (and the CEO if possible): Since this decision, ...


115

That's what your manager is there for. If you have problems getting the information that you need to do your job, and since you have no authority to order anyone to help you, your manager should talk to the other manager and sort it out. To repeat: You have no power. You can't make anyone do anything. That's not a matter of being independent. Your manager'...


92

Your coworker told you: there is no prebuilt script to do this doing this is not just a simple matter of a script; you need to be very sure you are not ruining all the data And you got all accusing, pasting bits of their own email back to them to prove that since there's no script, there's no process, which apparently means anyone can do what they like and ...


91

Is what I'm doing ethical? (I'll purposely define ethics/morals loosely and interchangeably here, since that is the sense of what I read in your question. As others point out, the terms don't have the same textbook definition. But in casual conversations, it's not necessary to be so strict with the terms.) Personal Ethics are always individual and ...


88

There are many potential reasons for a company to discriminate based upon your country. Tax Reasons Taxes can get very complex, very quickly. Even if your country allows you to take on all of the tax responsibilities, which is relatively uncommon, the company will have to spend money even getting an expert on your country's laws to confirm this. Otherwise, ...


80

At my last job, I inherited a relationship between my company and a large number of Ukrainian outsourcers that was suffering from this issue. Our people would lay out a general message of what we want to do in an email or ticket. The Ukrainians would read it and ask questions. Some of those questions would get answered, others would go unanswered, others ...


77

Some people still think that working remotely damages productivity and just gives people an excuse to slack off. HR is just the middle man, go straight to the CEO You need to be able to quantify to the CEO that this is not the case, and that his changes are damaging productivity. You need to approach him with cold hard facts and demonstrate a clear before ...


72

If I were to transfer, would I be expected to give up 1.5 hrs of my personal time or would I spend 1.5 fewer hours in the office? Your commute is your personal time. And how much time you spend in the office is up to you and your employer. I don't know how it works at your company, but I have never heard of an employer who would say something like "Oh, ...


71

It's very hard to answer this, as you're only one side of the equation, and you admittedly question your own judgment on the situation, but as I'm in essentially the same position (USA: I'm in Denver, most of company is in Michigan), here are a few things to consider: Do not underestimate how valuable it is to have someone to send on-site. How many ...


68

If you, personally, are not able to keep an eye on estimates and make sure they don't get ridiculous, you probably need at least one person that you do trust who can confirm. Beyond that, it's just a case of "if the work keeps rolling in, I'm happy." It is my experience that the programmers who are most productive are those who are most trusted and have the ...


68

There's a conflict here between two different things: What's a reasonable salary for a remote worker in your location doing your job? Assuming they really are adjusting correctly for the local market, the lower figure is a reasonable salary for the role. If the cut is too much then you could get a higher-paying job from someone else in your new location. ...


57

It would be one thing if the conference was mandatory and your manager said your coworker must stay at your house, however it sounds like it's optional and he's trying to compromise with you. He wants to let you both go, but they aren't interested in paying hotel fees for your coworker. So it seems like it's the type of situation where you're asking for a ...


53

My answer comes from the following experience: over the last 15 years or so, I've had jobs in which I telecommuted anywhere from 1 day a week to full-time, for a range of companies from those that had an office space where people worked on-site to those that had one in name only (to meet clients and pick up mail), for big organizations and small ones. I ...


52

I'm surprised no one is addressing the disability. He left yesterday, citing lack of handicap-accessible doors. There's no way for him to reliably get in and out of the bathroom without help at work, park his handicap van or open any doors easily. The problem isn't losing a "perk". The problem is your company has failed to accommodate a disabled ...


51

I used to do this for a living. What I find is people dread the idea that their time might be wasted. If you let them know up front you are going to respect their time, they'll be way more likely to make an effort. Usually, after putting together the table of contents (and getting it approved), I divvied up all the topics and mentally "assigned" the ...


47

You should consult your employees manual for exactly what you are entitled to submit for hours, failing that consult your manager or HR. They should be able to answer this more completely than anyone on here. That said as a general guide you should be entitled to claim any time you are in work for meetings, plus travelling time to and from work (at least ...


45

This is likely to be very opinion based on company specific, and there are many companies like Stack Exchange who embrace remote offices, however the principal reasons often revolve around collaboration. While this is very possible remotely (and I support this model completely), the thinking is that staff are in close proximity. If they have a question ...


44

I work from home all the time - I have no other office though I do travel sometimes and work from hotel rooms, client offices, and hotel convention centres. My habit is to avoid any alcohol until my work day is over, and not to go do some more work after dinner if I had wine with dinner. This is not really because the alcohol has impaired me (I almost never ...


41

I'm a technical writer who works with remote developers -- by which I mean 500 miles away, not "in the office only some days". There are two keys to solving this problem, and you've only asked about one of them so far (getting them to respond). I'll get to that, but first I'm going to talk about the other one. Developers (or any subject-matter experts, ...


40

At the first sign of confusion, you should have picked up the telephone, or arranged a Skype meeting. It's very simple for stuff to get lost in translation - and I can't presume, but if the native tongue of neither side of the e-mail is English, that's all the more reason to pick up the phone and work stuff out.


39

I've been remote for several well-known companies since 1999 and another stint in the early 90's. I've been both an individual contributor and a manager. Take it for what it's worth... I define myself as a remote as "an individual working from home or a rented office". This is opposed to an off-site or off-shore development team where all employees are ...


39

I also dream of working independently and from wherever I want. But there are some things to consider about full-time teleworking: Out of sight, out of mind It is harder to get people to remember you're there when they never see you. You run the risk of not getting promotions, bonuses, and even new project assignments. Non-Verbal cues If you're only a ...


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