255

If it was the CEO's decision to take away the work from home policy then HR is simply doing what they have been directed to do. If there is anyone that needs to be convinced it is the CEO. You can try to approach the CEO and explain the situation with this specific employee and see if they can make an exception. The problem with that, though, is that it ...


224

I have been working remotely for the last five years. And I can say that the last week was totally different from any week before. First of all, personally: Although I am an experienced remote worker, I was hardly able to focus on my work and I did very little progress during the last week. There are way more chats going on, because of uncertainty, people ...


196

First, as a tip, try to mute your microphone unless you have to speak. That way you will minimize the noise the others in the meeting perceive. Now, given you are this baby's mother and it's perfectly natural to care for them and feed them, I don't think you have to ask for permission, nor do I think it's possible (or even legal) for them to forbid you to ...


195

Why do remote companies require working in the US? Those companies are likely based in the US and don't want to deal with the legal and tax complexities of having employees who live in multiple countries. It is complicated enough for some companies to deal with employees from various states within the US. Also having employees from around the world will ...


187

Simple answer - Move Out Move out. If you don't want to deal with your parents treating you like a child, you might have to move out to make this happen. It sounds like you have been working FT for several years, too, so are likely old enough this could happen. If you can't afford it currently start saving money like mad to be able to as soon as possible. ...


165

Does this request seem wrong? It makes me uncomfortable but I'm not sure it's really crossing a line. What do you think? I think the request is foolish. As a long time manager, I would never impose on anyone on my team that way. If the company was having financial difficulties, I'd just say "No" to the request to attend the conference, and not try to pass ...


154

From what I understand, here are my answers to your questions: Did I say anything wrong? In my opinion, yes: In asking for clarification on whether or not there was a program to do what the requester wanted, you ignored the strongly worded point of RP's message: that this is a dangerous change to make, and must be discussed with the manager. This ...


154

What is in your contract? If there is no written contract, no problem. You just say thank you but no, thank you, that's not the deal we had, and walk away. Stress the part about meetings and completion date changes certainly not being what you agreed to. You have no obligation to respect deal you didn't make. If the contract you signed does not say a thing ...


144

When you are missing a response from your boss, the very worst thing you can do is exactly what you did last time. They say that insanity is repeating the same action and expecting different results. So don't just send the same email or forward it with a meaningless intro like "still need an answer on this" or "any update?" You need to ...


123

It sounds like your CEO has made a mandate and HR probably has their hands tied by it. The best way to deal with upper management's mandates is to make sure they fully understand the costs of them, and that they are consciously accepting those consequences. In your position, I would lay out the facts to HR (and the CEO if possible): Since this decision, ...


121

The disadvantages of an employee located in another country or even another continent are myriad. Some of them may be imaginary, but that doesn't stop companies considering them: paperwork and taxes. Do I have to send some sort of form to some foreign government? What if that government doesn't even work in English? Is it legal for them to work for me? Do ...


120

Is this actually a thing? Can a company really get me in trouble for this? Since you are living and working in the US, yes they can. Chances are, they can fire you for any reason or none at all (depending on your local state laws). Their "your home is our office" argument is absurd, but being a smoker is not a protected class and doing it on company time, ...


115

That's what your manager is there for. If you have problems getting the information that you need to do your job, and since you have no authority to order anyone to help you, your manager should talk to the other manager and sort it out. To repeat: You have no power. You can't make anyone do anything. That's not a matter of being independent. Your manager'...


113

Ask for the commute to be part of your working hours or ask for overtime pay.


99

You also were naked at the office slept overnight at the office and possibly made an overly fragrant lunch at the office brought your pet to the office had sex or masturbated at the office The argument that context doesn't matter is clearly absurd. None of the reasons they presented to you make any sense. (some people in the comments pointed out some ...


93

Your coworker told you: there is no prebuilt script to do this doing this is not just a simple matter of a script; you need to be very sure you are not ruining all the data And you got all accusing, pasting bits of their own email back to them to prove that since there's no script, there's no process, which apparently means anyone can do what they like and ...


91

Is what I'm doing ethical? (I'll purposely define ethics/morals loosely and interchangeably here, since that is the sense of what I read in your question. As others point out, the terms don't have the same textbook definition. But in casual conversations, it's not necessary to be so strict with the terms.) Personal Ethics are always individual and ...


90

There are many potential reasons for a company to discriminate based upon your country. Tax Reasons Taxes can get very complex, very quickly. Even if your country allows you to take on all of the tax responsibilities, which is relatively uncommon, the company will have to spend money even getting an expert on your country's laws to confirm this. Otherwise, ...


85

At my last job, I inherited a relationship between my company and a large number of Ukrainian outsourcers that was suffering from this issue. Our people would lay out a general message of what we want to do in an email or ticket. The Ukrainians would read it and ask questions. Some of those questions would get answered, others would go unanswered, others ...


82

Some people still think that working remotely damages productivity and just gives people an excuse to slack off. HR is just the middle man, go straight to the CEO You need to be able to quantify to the CEO that this is not the case, and that his changes are damaging productivity. You need to approach him with cold hard facts and demonstrate a clear before ...


82

If you place your personal laptop let's say on the kitchen table and connect it to your wi-fi and your work laptop on your desk and connect it to your work (probably using your wi-fi and a VPN) There should be no way that your professional laptop can know what your personal laptop is doing. If it does, that would be considered hacking/invasive and certainly ...


81

When is the right time to ask management for a part-time remote work solution? Depends a bit on your relationship with your boss, but I think now is a good time to have this conversation. You are working from home at the moment anyway, this is a great opportunity to test-drive any processes or changes that may be required to make this permanent. Approach ...


77

When I was reading this question, I zeroed in on this statement: I also feel very sleepy all day long. I get good sleep but perhaps, it's the high amount of coffee I drink. I have tried drinking less and more coffee but didn't have much improvement either way. While this seems pretty innocuous, sleepiness and malaise would be signs of depression to me. ...


75

How do I ask my manager to make camera mandatory in video meetings without making it look like a complaint? Don't. Some/Many people aren't comfortable being on camera. This is their personal space. Don't invade it. I don't mean that their home is their personal space (even though it is), I mean that making the choice to be on video or not is a personal ...


72

If I were to transfer, would I be expected to give up 1.5 hrs of my personal time or would I spend 1.5 fewer hours in the office? Your commute is your personal time. And how much time you spend in the office is up to you and your employer. I don't know how it works at your company, but I have never heard of an employer who would say something like "Oh, ...


71

It's very hard to answer this, as you're only one side of the equation, and you admittedly question your own judgment on the situation, but as I'm in essentially the same position (USA: I'm in Denver, most of company is in Michigan), here are a few things to consider: Do not underestimate how valuable it is to have someone to send on-site. How many ...


68

There's a conflict here between two different things: What's a reasonable salary for a remote worker in your location doing your job? Assuming they really are adjusting correctly for the local market, the lower figure is a reasonable salary for the role. If the cut is too much then you could get a higher-paying job from someone else in your new location. So ...


67

Be clear. Really clear. tl;dr. Your question here is really long. Your example email response is still pretty long and even so doesn't really answer the question. You need to be direct. If you can't launch, don't give a list of reasons and not say so. Say, "we can't launch yet. Here is why." Q: {client} is getting antsy. When can we launch www.xyz.com? ...


66

I would have the discussion with the boss with no mention of potentially leaving. That is a given. Any time there is a negotiation or discussion involving such matters there is an implication that leaving the company if your needs are not met is a possibility. Apart from that I would stress the personal angle of wanting to relocate to be near family and your ...


58

I'm surprised no one is addressing the disability. He left yesterday, citing lack of handicap-accessible doors. There's no way for him to reliably get in and out of the bathroom without help at work, park his handicap van or open any doors easily. The problem isn't losing a "perk". The problem is your company has failed to accommodate a disabled ...


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