58

One option is to ask your manager. Sitting in 37 degrees in a full suit is unbearable and detrimental to your productivity in the short run (as you're experiencing) and detrimental to your health in the long run. Mention to your manager that because of the heat your productivity suffers and ask for the airco to be turned up. Also point out that clients are ...


51

I'm going to take your word that your claims are accurate and because of this I'm recommending a more alarming and drastic approach: 37° Celsius is far, far beyond acceptable temperatures in any office, let alone in one where you have to wear a suit. That's completely ridiculous. You can take a couple different approaches to get this remedied: The Nice ...


24

You may not be in the UK, but the following from the Health and Safety Executive (an independent watchdog for work-related health and safety), has some information on Thermal Comfort in the work place. There's also this document on Heat stress in the work place, which lists some physical and psychological issues that heat can induce. It's probably more ...


20

Rather than trying to simply make a case to work from home, you should be generally working with your manager (and human resources, if your company has an HR staff) to develop a good solution that works for everyone. I think that going in with the attitude that you want to work from home because your office environment is uncomfortable will come off as ...


20

What is the best solution for me? I suggest you approach HR or your manager, and tell them about this. Say that currently the AC is distracting you from your work, and ask what can be done to solve it. You can then work on a solution that is Ok for everybody. Taking a guess, I assume that the AC stream can be redirected, in a way that it does not point ...


15

If you're the odd one out, the burden falls on you to adapt. Get a personal desk fan to keep yourself ventilated. Dress for the temperature. Lightweight, loose clothing that is meant for warm environments like linen will make a big difference. If there is a cooler part of the office, ask to move your workstation there.


14

I'm going to supplement Thomas Owens's answer: Call the engineering / janitorial staff, too. I see this play out all too often. I rent an office from another company (since I work in a different city as our company HQ). Recently they hired a new receptionist who was "always cold." I came back from a trip and found my power off. (After first checking ...


12

You're right in thinking that going to your manager is still premature at this point. From what I can tell, you haven't actually pushed the subject with your coworker, so that's your first step. It's time to be direct, your script should be something like the following: Hey X, I know we've talked about closing our office door before but we never really ...


11

Biology rules in this case. You can always get a heater or put on more clothes if you are too cold, but the options are limited if you're too hot, and that's how you can begin to approach it. I'm sorry, Dave, but it's just too hot in here for us. I'm sorry if you're uncomfortable, but you can put on a jacket or sweater while we can't do anything to cool ...


9

It certainly is not unprofessional to shut the door. That is why offices have doors to begin with. Talk to your boss about the issue. Explain that 3 of 4 of you want the door closed but the other person vehemently does not. Get his permission to shut the door and then shut it. Allow him to deal with the person who doesn't like going with the majority in ...


8

I can take 80° F but I don't know anyone that would think 90° F is reasonable for an office. I don't know if you are in the US but OSHA has a temperature guideline of 68-76° F and humidity control in the range of 20% - 60%. But that is just a guideline and is not enforced. I would go to your manager and then his / her manager and if that goes nowhere ...


7

Computers do not like hot temperatures either You are not the only victim in your workplace, all the computers in your workplace are likely also suffering with you. If you go the route of talking with Management you can also bring up the damage the office temperature is having on the computers. Based off of several articles: PC Operating Temperatures and ...


7

Assuming that everything in the question is really true, I see these realistic options. It seems management is already aware in some sense of the misery you are experiencing, though you have framed it as a male vs female issue. So, regardless of what you do from here, keep sex and gender out of it. This is about having an environment you can work ...


7

There's two methods (apart from all these suggestions of quitting). Firstly, you can go with the game or just turn on the aircon and ignore their tantrums which is probably what I would do. Then stand up to HR if I need to. I'd do it as politely as I could, but I'd be firm about it. Secondly if you want to play your own game because you can't concentrate ...


6

Don't be embarrassed to mention this stuff. It is routine work to adjust the ventilation to match the needs of the occupants of an office building. That is especially true if your new floor was recently renovated. There's no way for the heating / ventilation / air conditioning (HVAC) people to know unless you tell them.


5

Make sure your complaints are backed up by a log of temperatures in your office(s) and take your complaint to HR. If they are not helping you or say, sorry we don't have a temperature controlled place to allocate to you, you know what to do: QUIT. I hope you have some intangible skill to let you land another job shortly. No amount of money they are paying ...


5

Is there any way you can discuss with the building manager having the temperature control on your floor adjusted? It sounds like a few of you in the offices are experiencing the same problem. I was able to contact the building manager at my office in regards to the air conditioning being too strong (and thus freezing) in the summer time. They were happy to ...


5

In the Philippines, a tropical country, you can dress professionally (smart casual/business) with the following examples: Men: Lightly-colored polo with cuffs No tie Light grey, brown, or any conservatively-colored pants Leather shoes of any conservative color Polo shirt, a piece of clothing whose collar and fabric is the same as a polo, but the arms and ...


5

Ask yourself if the AC is 'worth' changing. Since you are the only one that has a problem with it, and you are moving to a new office in a month, I would not bother.


4

In Swiss there is a law indicating the best practice for the workplace temperature (OLT3 art. 16, OLT= Ordonnance 3 relative a la Loi sur le Travail). The law does not give actual numbers, but usual interpretations indicates that 21-23 Celsius degrees is good for a non manual seated job, and for a manual seated job 20-22 Celsius degrees. The law is here: ...


3

HVAC is one of the things that is very likely to be screwed up when a building is renovated, particularly if the layout of the rooms within the building are changed. I have no doubt that the renovations could have resulted in the problems you've described. The first step is to document the problem so people can't dismiss you by saying you're imagining or ...


3

I live in the tropics and for the sake of my equipment keep my office so cold that I wear a jacket and woollen hat when I'm in it, I don't have any problems concentrating, but if you're not dressing for it, you must really be suffering. Generally not a great idea to be complaining as soon as you start a job, but you have good cause, 62 degrees seems pretty ...


2

Wearing a jacket is the best possible solution to me. I have seen many of my colleagues doing so. I am used to more hotter temperatures as I am from a coastal city. You are used with more hotter temperatures, this is your personal matter(why would others worry for this). my skin breaks in reaction to cold temperature Use a moisturizer. Another idea ...


2

You have to follow the chain of command, address the issue with your manager. Let them know that this is affecting your health, and that you need reasonable temperature control for your work space. Ask them if there is anything they can do to help. The answer may be no. But if there is anything that can be done they are the ones most likely to be able to ...


2

my collegues insist on get the AC always on This mean you will be unlikely to convince them to turn it off. Replacing an AC would be a company expense that the company is very unlikely willing to pay for. However, if you do wish for that to happen, you'd need to take it up with your manager/boss. Expect to have your request denied though. If you still ...


2

You have come in touch with one of the most touchy subjects in office environments: the office temperature! Being on the hot side myself (my comfort zone is around 18-20 degree Celsius), I understand the topic. What I did when I had to face the issue was: I tried lightening my clothes as much as the office dress code allowed, and then if that was not ...


1

I worked for a very large company. They had a very formal dress code. Suit, white shirt and tie required. Over time, the rules relaxed to sport coat and tie, and then colored shirts were okay... At one point in time, one group of engineers decided they'd had enough with wearing a tie to work. So regardless of the stated dress code these guys all grouped ...


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