33

would it be better for me to take my manager's resignation plan or say no and wait for HR to terminate me? Do neither. Don't resign now. Don't just wait around to be terminated. Instead, work hard to find your next job first, then give your notice.


28

Do not resign. Take your chances. In these Covid times, employers will be more understanding even if you are terminated. Also, as others have pointed out, you may actually be able to get unemployment benefits for being terminated and not for resigning. Finally the point about good recommendation; If he is asking you to resign because of bad performance, then ...


12

In the letter, should I write that I was "asked to resign" as the reason for leaving my position? No, just do something along the lines of: "I regret to inform you that I will be resigning my position with [blah place], effective on [mm/dd/yyy]." Keep it as simple and brief as possible. If you are serving a notice period, add that as ...


11

Usually in the United States, you are not eligible for unemployment benefits if you have resigned, but you are eligible if you were fired for poor performance. Your manager's claim that you could still claim unemployment benefits if you resign contradicts this, and you should not necessarily believe that he is right about this. Perhaps you are in a unique ...


7

Your manager has his own best interest at heart, not yours. So when it is about losing your job, following the manager's advice without checking it very carefully is never a good idea. Here's a possibility: Your manager doesn't like you and wants to get rid of you. All his talks with HR are just made up, and he can't lay you off at all. But if he convinces ...


5

The university will ask you to do what's in their best interest. You can be reasonably sure that it's not in your best interest. The only times when you would resign yourself are (1) if you want to leave and they don't want to let you go, and (2) if you did something that exposes you to criminal charges, and you are given the choice of resigning or the ...


4

You were "terminated without cause" (one can assume, since they did not provide a cause). There may be notice and severance you would be due, depending on what province you are in, but with only two months in it's unlikely - see this chart for the requirements per province. Evaluate if you were due notice or severance you didn't get, if so you ...


3

If you need unemployment insurance benefits more than a spotless employment history, then let them terminate you. If you need to control your employment history so that there's nothing to explain from this job, then resign. (If you resign, make the letter short and to the point; disregard the 'forced' part.)


1

They want you to resign instead of directly terminating your employment. They have a reason - it can only be guessed at why. Use this to your advantage. Negotiate as to what they will do for you to resign as opposed to firing you outright. Severance pay? Continuation of benefits at employee rates for a period of time? Usage of outplacement resources? Do ...


1

Your manager is at least right that resigning rather than being terminated will look better for you in the future. Jobs may ask whether you've been fired from a position in the last x years, and whether or not the manager actually gives you a "good" recommendation, he'll at least be able to confirm you left in good standing if you resign instead. ...


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