237

The Employee View No, you do not. Companies often want you to sign things at termination (noncompetes, IP agreements, NDAs, promises not to sue them...). These agreements are ubiquitous especially in tech jobs in the US. You are asked to sign them at employment, which you have to do or not get employed. Then you are asked to sign them at termination (or ...


164

I wanna know that what could I say to prove that he couldn’t fire me on my last day cause I already gave him my 2-week notice As you are an at-will you can be fired pretty much for any reason, and not showing up (without giving adequate notice/excuse) is definitely on the "can be fired for" list. Though in fairness it seems like your boss wanted ...


135

TLDR version: You absolutely should give him this empty promotion with the promise that there will be a stated goal (and activity) towards making it not empty in the future. You should thank Gus for his honesty. You should be fighting to keep this guy for this kind of honesty. The fact that he feels safe enough to share these exact thoughts with you is a ...


111

Obviously, the result of one of the interviews was the engagement of your replacement, somebody cheaper perhaps. There's not much you can do. In the USA, either employer or employee can end an employment instantly for no reason at all. You could contact your former employer and explain that if he ever tells anyone else that your till was consistently $5....


109

You're reading a lot into his behaviour. Sure, those could be signs he's about to quit, but they are more general signs of unhappiness. It could mean trouble in his personal life, dissatisfaction with his job that's not bad enough to quit over, poor mental or physical health, or something else. Unless his performance is falling below acceptable, then as a ...


105

Can I improve my view on this issue? Get a new job and then quit. Don't wait to be fired or try and get fired. That looks bad on your CV in the future. Whereas it's perfectly fine to accept another job. Once you have decided on a course like this and started seriously implementing it, your focus and priorities will change. The things that are frustrating ...


88

I can't see the advantage in you waiting - if you've been laid off, you presumably want to find new work as quickly as possible. As you say, company A (or any other company) may well not be prioritising hiring at the moment, and as such you may struggle to gain traction - but you won't know unless you apply. If it were me in that situation, I would be ...


81

I don't think the employee did anything wrong beyond forgetting to ask for hard copies. In addition, this client seems like they were already primed to leave. Your employee made one clear mistake (although not a major one) in not being clear that a hard copy of the information was required. The rest seems perfectly within the range of acceptable behavior. ...


78

I'm legally obligated to provide 3 weeks of severance. Then it seems to me that the answer is clear: give your 3 week notice, serve it, get paid and leave, take good use of that time to recover from burnout and then start your new job with a fresh mindset and energy. To my point of view, framing this situation so they fire you in order to get more money ...


72

You no longer work there, so unless you had a prior contractual obligation to sign this they can't make you do anything. I'd actually be really cautious about signing this. As I understand this, the new agreement applies for 12 months from when you sign it, not 12 months from when you quit. That may actually be why they waited six months. Check what your ...


68

Speaking as someone who's been in a somewhat analogous situation to Gus here, denying them the promotion will make them much more likely to leave than just giving it to them. They want it. They've earned it. They're willing to compromise with the company given the situation (no salary increase) in order to get it. If they can't get it from your company then ...


67

What are the potential ramifications to me if I decide to take their offer of being terminated? Seems like your company is being very nice. I see no significant downside to taking the offer of severance. You will have to indicate you were fired, if asked during an interview. But you could also explain the offer you took. Make sure you are fully prepared to ...


53

Initially, I added this as a comment, but I think that it warrants a full answer. The company is offering you 2 and a half months of pay, plus a month of health insurance. This means that they're also paying all the associated costs and taxes that you don't see. (The offer to stay on company insurance is bogus as COBRA takes care of this). In return, they ...


52

No, as you don’t know how long this will last. There are estimates that predict this will last 18 months. Find a place to wait out the storm. There could easily be a stampede of applicants as jobs disappear.


52

Try to choose an employer that might background check differently. I am good friends with all my past bosses, so I have been able to glean some insight into how background checking like this might work. For the bank, it was very formal process where they hired a company to go through my resume and look at the various things I had put down. My references/the ...


45

One thing that hasn't been addressed in other answers is that in the US, employers often try to attach a 'cause' for termination in order to not have to pay unemployment. If an employee is terminated without cause (e.g. laid off), the employer will be responsible for paying their part of unemployment payments to the employee. Unfortunately, many times the '...


42

Don't jump to conclusions. The incident that you mentioned may not actually be what caused the potential employer to decide against you. Step one is to inform yourself. When a negative decision about you is made because of a background check or credit check, they're required to provide the name of the company that performed the check. You have the right to a ...


38

You don’t have to sign anything. Since there is no upside to you for signing, and possible downsides, I very, very strongly recommend that you don’t sign anything. If the letter said something like “in return for receiving £10,000 severance pay etc.” then you would think about it. And that is all.


38

So... right now, you want to be fired, rather than quitting - so that you can get the unemployment, so that you have the space to rebuild yourself psychologically, and then shape a life that isn't so toxic. One of your biggest problems is that your boss is insisting on you working large amounts of unpaid overtime. These two problems? They solve each other....


33

would it be better for me to take my manager's resignation plan or say no and wait for HR to terminate me? Do neither. Don't resign now. Don't just wait around to be terminated. Instead, work hard to find your next job first, then give your notice.


31

Do not resign. Take your chances. In these Covid times, employers will be more understanding even if you are terminated. Also, as others have pointed out, you may actually be able to get unemployment benefits for being terminated and not for resigning. Finally the point about good recommendation; If he is asking you to resign because of bad performance, then ...


30

Your company's resources are overstretched and can't pay employees properly anymore. Of course none of us know the true picture of what happens within the company. However, from what you're telling us, it appears the company doesn't have the resources (nor the means to get more) to get everything done in good order. I think it's entirely possible he fired ...


29

Put yourself in your managers shoes for a minute: Your employee quit with 10 business days notice, the professional default in your country. But on the second to last day they don't show, with no message. On their last day, they call on short notice and say they "don't feel like it" for reasons they had never brought up before. That's not ...


28

If you have been hired to lead a team and then the whole team gets fired and not replaced, that sounds like a pretty valid reason to leave. You could not fulfill the role you were hired for without a team, after all.


27

What do you think I should do? Assuming you worked in an at-will employment state, there are very few things you can do. If this bookstore is part of a chain, you could appeal to the HR department. You could explain your situation, what happened, and the circumstances involved. It's possible, if unlikely, that they could intervene on your behalf. But ...


27

I'd say this solution is a hybrid of my interpretation of the advice from @DarkCyprus and a kind redditor. So, today was rough, but more-or-less rewarding. I received yet another demand to sign the paperwork that would put more responsibility on me (and the vaguely-worded promise of the "opportunity/ability" to earn more money), and increase the ...


25

This might depend somewhat on the size of the company, industry, and location, but generally if you are a valued member of your team your managers aren't going to want to lose you. In the workplace, honesty is always the best policy, there is no benefit to trying to stall or mislead here, it will only serve to stress you out. Remember the HR person is not ...


23

Do I come clean and tell them I'm still working on getting my degree, but that I don't have to go to any more classes or anything? Yes, of course. Explain that everything except your thesis is complete. And, assuming you are actually planning to complete your thesis and get your degree (as you had implied to them), tell them when you now expect to ...


23

If you are well prepared to lose a person, what would be needed? You are evidently a developer given you Stack Overflow profile. If turnover in China is anything like it is in North America (developers last 1-3 years on average), losing developers is a common occurrence and something most teams should be prepared for. The key questions to answer: Do they ...


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