New answers tagged

1

There is no clear way out of this situation The internship where you were terminated is something you could have gotten away with because the company was willing to help you there. The grades you will only get away with if they don’t not check. And frankly, if the recruiter advised you to lie about them, there is a decent chance that they won’t. A guy I ...


11

Is there any way for me to be honest with them, or resolve the situation without being knocked out of consideration for the job? There's an easy way to be honest with them. Write your own CV, using only truthful information. Give it to the interviewers. If asked, explain the discrepancies. If asked, don't make excuses, admit that it was a stupid mistake, ...


13

If you can't do the time, don't do the crime. There is no ethical way out of the situation except withdrawing the application, or providing a corrected CV with explanation - since you are objectively at fault here. If your explanation and apology is sincere, the employer may even give you a chance and decide to proceed. Any other solution involves more lying,...


3

You completely edited your question, which was about a recruitement agency doctoring your CV. Note that anybody who has given a good number of useful answers here can see the original. My advise is to restore it as it was. Note that many people here, including me, could restore your question, but it's better for your reputation to do it yourself. In this ...


1

It is a math decision and I think it is clearly saying you should stay. From what I understand, it will take you 18 months to complete your additional education. Even if you got a job right after your education is complete, you will only have 6 months left on this 2 year contract. With the two year contract you will earn an extra 12% per year, or a total ...


15

Investigate the following: Why they are so interested in locking you in? Is it just something they do with all employees? Are you going to be stuck on some crappy legacy project? Are you about to start a time sensitive project where they do not want delays? Will you be handling corporate secrets, so they do not want you jumping ship? Are there just a few ...


2

Every logic on this tread is moot. The reason is that you are in the USA, and most places are at-will. That means they could fire you if they didn't like the shoe laces you wore. Unfortunately all you can do is simply find a new job and move on. My thoughts: your boss hired a new person and had to get rid of you and saw a perfect opportunity. Or maybe he ...


8

I worked retail and warehousing for 10-15 years of my life. I haven't been in those industries for over a decade at this point, but my experience says the following: I've never actually heard of a register that didn't have a specific "No Sale" button allowing the drawer to be popped open for making change. The mere absence of that button on the register ...


2

If your employment was in an "at will" jurisdiction, there won't be much you can do. Even in jurisdictions that are not "at will", the burden of proof is typically on the employee -- that is, you are guilty unless you prove yourself innocent. As others have pointed out, it's generally regarded as your responsibility to know the business policies. But ...


46

One thing that hasn't been addressed in other answers is that in the US, employers often try to attach a 'cause' for termination in order to not have to pay unemployment. If an employee is terminated without cause (e.g. laid off), the employer will be responsible for paying their part of unemployment payments to the employee. Unfortunately, many times the '...


-2

From a security standpoint, opening the till without a sale is a HUGE RED FLAG and is therefore almost universal in retail that a till is never opened without a sale. To give you an example, one place where I worked had a policy in place where the ONLY time this was acceptable was after a robbery and ringing up "no sale". Employee theft is a massive ...


27

What do you think I should do? Assuming you worked in an at-will employment state, there are very few things you can do. If this bookstore is part of a chain, you could appeal to the HR department. You could explain your situation, what happened, and the circumstances involved. It's possible, if unlikely, that they could intervene on your behalf. But ...


4

I understand why you are upset. It's because the situation is unfair. It is unfair to schedule your shift so late that you cannot actually make it on time. It is unfair that they did not provide detailed enough directions so that you could find the location. It is unfair to waste your time using an invoicing app that doesn't work. And after wasting your time ...


0

What you should do? Find a new job. You admit yourself that your till was short on few occasions, and that you did indeed open the till without a sale so that's all the cause needed to fire you. Not knowing the policy is not a defense. In all likelihood is there to serve as exactly that, provision of cause for terminating people, but that's how it is with ...


-1

My condolences for your misfortune. What do you think I should do? Treat it as a life lesson and move on. Make sure when you're employed next time you re-confirm every single thing which could impact your job. Such as what you should do and shouldn't and have it in printed copy for both of you. If you have any evidence of the manager's wrongdoing you ...


111

Obviously, the result of one of the interviews was the engagement of your replacement, somebody cheaper perhaps. There's not much you can do. In the USA, either employer or employee can end an employment instantly for no reason at all. You could contact your former employer and explain that if he ever tells anyone else that your till was consistently $5....


10

I'm not sure if what they did is legal. Forget this part, completely as the dispute is over 20$ and your only recourse is to prove that you were not a contractor, but an employee which is not simple, or cheap, and just not worth the hassle. If you feel differently, engage a local lawyer, not random people on the internets. So for sake of this post, I will ...


4

Is there anyway I can salvage the situation? At least I would like to work my scheduled shift? With the disagreement with the invoice, we were only $20 apart. I didn't feel comfortable not addressing it but I certainly don't think this is something to lose the business relationship over. You could try explaining that you don't think this is ...


-5

having criminal record , you have more than 1 job that will not affected with your reputation like working online .. etc , and I think that u are a good man because u admits that u are guilty , you can make a a lot of good things to the community for the coming years .


1

First off, it's a great sign that you recognize that stealing your company was a terrible decision. Some people never acknowledge their mistakes and end traping themselves in a endless circle of self justifications. Second, we all make mistakes. Some even break the law and, as you experienced, all, in a way or another, suffer the consequences of their ...


-6

Considering that you are just 17 years old and you have stolen just $50, I would simply tell the truth during the job interview (if they ask you about reason of ending your last job). Honestly.. stealing money is pretty common, and can even happen by mistake. I do not agree with others that you should be deleting the question or changing your name. You ...


3

Do you have a criminal record for that? Do you want to work in the same industry? If both the answers are negative you are most likely okay and may live happily ever after. Even if you had the record there is still a chance the employer-to-be You did a really stupid thing. Shit happens. Everybody makes mistakes, some more serious some lesser serious. If ...


10

There are good advices in this answer, just adding a specific point: From my own small experience in a big well known fast-food brand when I was student (starts with "Mc", actually in France but I assume it's the same in other countries), they keep internal records of past employees and share them at least nation-wide. So if it's a big fast-food brand you ...


96

Unless the issue is being followed up on by the police, the matter is closed. Fast food is entry level work and presumably you are seeking to obtain similar work, so just leave the job off your resume and apply to other places. You may want to change your username for this question, as I Googled the name you have and can match certain identifying ...


22

I'm assuming you were just caught and fired on the spot. If so, that is likely the end of it. Unless you were arrested, indicted, found guilty, or have a warrant out for your arrest, you should be OK. Otherwise, if it was a juvenile conviction, your "record" goes away when you reach a certain age (or so I'm told - this may vary depending on which state you ...


12

A general rule to work by at this level is 'Pass information up, pass decisions down'. Give the investor your fair opinion of the CTO. Don't lead them into any decision you might want, or let them lead you into agreeing with their decision. Pass your information up, and let them pass a decision down - it's rarely correct to pass a decision up the ...


3

Is the CTO good for her current role? If the CTO is mired in detail, becoming a perpetual bottleneck and consistently missing her commitments then this sounds like a No. CTO's normally have a much more strategic focus on evolving the tech stack, reducing risk, designing and building new enabling technologies and technical and architectural standards. Also ...


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