New answers tagged

0

You can't change the past. The people you defended your father to have their opinions of you and him. What you can do now (whether you should or not, because even if he is a jerk he's still your father, is up to you) is to not defend him in the future. Like if people start talking shit about him, just let it slide and don't try to defend your father as ...


8

In someways it may be better to just leave the matter and just conduct yourself in a way that that your (future hypothetical) children would be proud of. In fact you should be conducting yourself that way no matter what. However it may be good to reach out to some of the people you defended your dad to (e.g., 'Abe') Saying something like this: I ...


12

My POS father was convicted several years ago of possessing child pornography. If I'd run around defending him, I would be tarnished. Just because "it's your dad" doesn't mean people will think it's ok to automatically defend him. Your actions don't have to be similar, defending the indefensible is enough to tarnish you. We share our first names, so ...


1

I'm not too tarnished - only by association You're not tarnished at all unless your actions have been similar. It's your dad, the people who would look down at you for defending him are the ones with the problem. Especially if they know you. In fact bad mouthing someones family to their face is both unprofessional and potentially dangerous. I find it ...


1

In the UK, with almost two years, your first goal is to finish the two years for the right to redundancy pay. After that, I see no reason why you would be fired. Being laid off and being fired is not the same thing. Let someone look at the financial impact of quitting vs. being laid off; quitting can cost you thousands. Obviously look if there are other ...


1

Sometimes situation may dictate not saying anything but in most cases a simple "Hi how have you been?" is all that is required. It is impossible to know what is going on in that person mind and at that point just be normal like anyone else would. Now if the firing was for something egregious or deplorable then staying silent is probably best. That said if ...


3

I had a similar problem about 8 years ago and the result was they eventually let everyone go including myself (laid off) from the department after the initial let go of several others. Weather or not you decide to stay with the company it is a good idea to keep some prospects open so you are not blindsided. If you are going to be the only developer for a ...


0

The biggest issue here seems to be the uncertainty of the why this happened and what it means for you. This sounds like the perfect time to negotiate for a big raise! First of all you just had several successful projects. Then you are now alone responsible for everything. But that aside, it's also a perfect strategy to test the waters: If they really want ...


0

Depends on the person and the circumstances. Obviously if they're drunk or drugged that could create an issue. But in the normal run of affairs, just ignore them and let them initiate any greeting. You'll be better able to judge the correct reaction based on that. Obviously a bunch of swear words while they roll up their sleeves is probably a bad sign. ...


5

This really needs a country tag! But anyway, here is another angle you could take: You can offer to leave voluntarily. In many countries and Legislation this makes it A LOT easier for your employer and can be a good bargaining chip. Then you offer to keep going as a freelancer for the type of work that shows up occasionally and that would be a "waste of ...


10

For example, if a person is at Starbucks and meets a former employee that he fired what should he do? Say something like "Hi. How are you doing?" Just because you fired someone, that doesn't mean you should act any differently than you would with any other former employee.


4

However it would be a lot easier on my finances if I stayed for another 2-3 months. I’m considering suggesting to my boss that I’d be happy to carry on working there for this period, and for me to just continue working the really basic kinds of projects that I’ve been given over the last few months (the kind where it’s a waste for them to be passed ...


1

I would suggest that you have an open discussion with your boss: Explain your concerns, together try to find a solution that works for both of you (this depends on what you want and what the company wants). Even if this discussion does not yield a good result, it's still better than just quitting, because if that is the alternative, you do not have much to ...


6

In my experience many corporations tend to have stupid processes, when it comes to layoffs. They are all made for the worst case senarios when an employee goes berserk. Nobody involved actually wants to be involved in the process. Usually this is why they don't talk "about it". And everybody wants it quickly over. In your case : the company has proved ...


11

If the whole team except you is gone, then you are at risk. Check out what payments others received. Look out for new jobs. You don’t want to quit yourself because that means zero redundancy pay, but you want to be able to go into a new job as soon as pushed.


14

What should he do? What would he do if he met anybody else at Starbucks? Whatever that is, do that.


1

Would it be smart to apply for jobs now? Yes. or does the situation not look too dire at this point? It looks fairly dire to me. If you want to stick it out, that's your choice, but I'd be looking for another job rather than crossing my fingers and hoping for the best.


3

Would it be smart to apply for jobs now or does the situation not look too dire at this point? I like to avoid layoffs when I can. So, for me, I'd be looking for another job now. I know some folks who don't mind being laid off and collecting unemployment for a while. They would likely just stick around and see what happens. You get to decide how "dire" ...


2

IANAL. This sounds a lot like she should consult a lawyer. My understanding of at-will employment is you can only be let go for any LEGAL reason more than ANY reason. I can’t say whether this passes the test to be considered illegal, but there are definitely components of sexual harassment at play where abuse of position is occurring. This also ...


2

HR is never your friend. Writing letters will do nothing (and if it did... your friend would be unlikely to find out anyway). If your friend wants to pursue the issue, the only recourse they have is to talk to an employment attorney. They're the only people who can listen to all the evidence and determine if there's a case worth chasing. Grudges are very ...


5

I suggest she not send the letter. It serves no purpose and likely won't amount to much. If HR saw no problem with a manager trying to coerce a subordinate to promote someone he had a relationship with, they're not likely to care about the contents of that letter. She is instead free to post a review of the employer on various job boards if she feels it ...


0

In this circumstance would it be more of a negative impact for her to send a letter documenting the sequence of facts that occured with the manager to the highest level of leadership? Depends on the company culture, the particulars of the industry, and the values of the executive that you're sending the letter to. It's possible it might do nothing, it's ...


51

This is a huge, horrible mess. Promoting you to make you fail is called constructive termination ... And it's the oldest trick in the book. A company can't get someone to quit, and can't lay them off (for some reason). So they setup the employee to fail. they send him out on an urgent job with a minor piece of safety equipment broken, then fire him for ...


2

We used to say that "Just cause" really means "Just 'cause we felt like it". The simple fact is that businesses have been at this for a long time, and put so many rules in the employee handbooks that you are always violating some policy or other. At any time, all they have to do is compile a list of violations, and then terminate you for cause.


5

To be fired for-cause requires generally the satisfaction of one or many criteria including: Dishonesty (including theft, fraud, deception and breach of trust) Conflicts of interest Inappropriate relationship (with boss, junior employee) Insolence or insubordination (disobeying a boss, acting rude or abrasive) Breach of important rules or policies Theft or ...


33

Can you be promoted and then fired for-cause? The "for-cause" part in the US is mostly irrelevant. Almost all states have "at will" employment so you can leave or be terminated for any or no reason at any time. In the US there are far easier and direct ways to get rid of an unwanted employee than staging a mock promotion. This being said, it's a pretty ...


4

It is not possible to promote an employee without their acceptance. If the employee accepts the promotion, they are responsible for the (new)tasks they have to do. Then, if they are under-performing or whatever, the company can(should) fire/replace them. If someone is getting promoted, it doesn't just mean better benefits/salary, but also harder problems ...


3

With great (any new) power, comes great (newer) responsibilities. Someone can be very good at doing something (existing responsibilities), but not good at doing something else (the new ones). If the new job requires something new to be done, which the promoted employee cannot seem to manage, eventually the company needs to find a replacement. That is why, ...


-2

I have been in 'senior management' since 1988 and as a consultant in a lot of 'huge' corporations/conglomerates/multi-nationals and also small businesses. What your mid-manager is doing is NORMAL in most work places, sadly. Mid managers are usually afraid of young people coming up the ladder, and sadly, top management condones this... So, what your mid (or ...


2

Yes. You also threw away your right to unemployment. Or thought you did, that was the real point of it (for them). Actually, when you are "asked" to resign (or else you'll be fired), unemployment works same as if you were fired - there's a hearing, and you get the unemployment unless the employer can show you engaged in serious misconduct. Rejecting you ...


1

Yup, totally unprofessional and in many cases consideration for constructive dismissal - in that he expects you to find out and resign, saving the company the trouble of firing you or his personal preference to get rid of you without any means of firing you. So, start keeping a diary of all the times he has been like this, all the things you've heard or ...


6

How can it be that people with more seniority are being laid off due to the reason "lack of money". I was also told during orientation that contract Y was just renewed as Y2 for another 10 years, and they are hiring many people. I have worked on contracts where the customer changed the definition and rates for the various jobs when they renewed the ...


27

While I agree with some of the other answers that depending on the situation it would be wise to start looking for other work opportunities, I would like to address another point that you have in your question. Keep in mind this will depend on your organization's culture and structure, so you will have to judge that for yourself. You say he has been ...


3

Is this misconduct on his part? Surely he shouldn't be saying that.. This all depends on whether or not your colleague will be taking on your responsibilities after you are let go. I have seen many cases where managers will speak to employees directly affected by a firing before the soon to be fired knows. Sometimes it is to get ahead on knowledge ...


40

Is this misconduct on his part? Yes, it is. He most certainly should not be discussing that with his subordinates. But at this point does it matter for you? Surely you will be fired regardless if the information being shared with you is accurate... My advise to you would be to ask your line manager directly, without revealing your source. If you are ...


120

Is this misconduct on his part? Surely he shouldn't be saying that.. Don't know if "misconduct" is the word but surely this is something unprofessional to do. However, I fear that the point here is that you were hinted that you may be getting fired soon, so I would be preparing my resume and start applying to jobs ASAP.


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