216

Do as you're doing; call the time period by a phrase that you're comfortable with. Maybe even use the role title - so instead of a job being x man hours, it would be 'x' hours, made up of 'y' developer hours and 'z' analyst hours.


191

Don't chastise anyone for using "man-hours", it's an ingrained part of traditional English usage. Continue to use "person-hours" whenever possible. The laughing will eventually subside. Attitudes and language often change together, and always change slowly. The best metaphor for your efforts should be: orthodontists do not straighten teeth with a hammer.


84

This is a common approach in response to a work (overload?) request. This is not meant to be about you or your team. Collaborators are generally people who work together to resolve an issue, task, project, etc. You are a collaborator once you are assigned a task, project or otherwise with other people. "Resources" cover more than people. This may ...


80

"Man hours" is a unit for an amount of work done, measured in such a way that (a) it's easy to determine how many units a person can do in a week, and (b) it's easy to determine the cost of the people doing the work. So yes, you do produce "man hours" of work. You could also say that you produce "woman hours" of work, and that all the men in your team ...


70

It refers to the employer being an equal opportunities employer. m refers to male (in some places also minority). f refers to female. d refers to disabled. v refers to veteran.


47

Well, let's leave aside for the moment that "Manpower" IS gender-neutral ("Man" meaning Mankind, and not males. Woman is actually a subset/specialization of Man, if you want to break the language down to brass tacks). Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woman#Etymology But, I've seen this ridiculous exercise played out a few times, and in all but one, ...


47

There is nothing wrong with using the term man-hours. Although it does have the word "man" in it it is definitely not geared in any way shape or form towards any sort of gender bias. If the term somehow offends you instead of using "man-hours" just use the term "hours". Some of the other answers provide options that may be more suitable for you as well.


43

Is there a commonly accepted substitute for this abbreviation which is gender neutral? My current company (and several others where I have worked) uses the term FTE - Full-time Equivalent. We use that for project planning and staffing. No gender is stated or implied by that term. I've heard it used at many companies in my part of the world, but I don't ...


41

I think you are overthinking this. "Simon, my boss" is fine. If you dislike "boss" you can try "manager" instead. If you use "CTO" be prepared to explain what that means to people unfamiliar with the term and then you might have an awkward conversation. "Boss" doesn't have a negative connotation to most people. But if you are really worried about this, why ...


33

This is a fine question! Parkinson's bike shed isn't as notorious in the US as it is in the UK, so here it's even harder to use "bikeshedding" as a short keyword to capture peoples' attention. If you're running a meeting yourself, you can ask someone to keep a written list of "items requiring attention." When the metaphorical bike shed comes up for ...


32

In my workplace of software engineers we use the term 'engineer hours'. I find this term less awkward to my ear than 'person hours'. We also sometimes say 'development hours' in reference to software development and I imagine similar phrasing could be used in other industries. This wording in my work place seems to have come into place naturally. I have ...


28

OTE means On-target Earnings. (See also what Wikipedia has to say.) It is usually used when an employee has a "variable" component (commission, bonus, etc.) to their compensation. Their compensation is made up of both base salary plus the variable bonus, commission, etc. "On-target earnings" is used to describe the sum of both of these amounts. OTE = Base ...


27

The word “man” does not just refer to males. In several contexts, it refers to a person (or people) without gender qualification. This is quite clear from the first three descriptions on wiktionary (in fact, nr 4, 5, and 6 are also gender-neutral): man (plural men) An adult male human. - The show is especially popular with middle-aged men.‎ (...


25

As long as you are not gratuitously using the words, you should always aim at correct pronunciation. Knowingly imitating an incorrect pronunciation is dishonorable and groveling behavior. Correct behavior is to pronounce words correctly and ignore other people who may be pronouncing the word incorrectly. The only thing to avoid would be unnecessarily using ...


23

From What is the difference between being fired and being laid off?: Being fired is reserved for individual personnel issues: performance, behavior, etc. This would be targeted at a single individual. Being laid off is when the company is having financial issues and needs to remove costs. This is almost never just a single individual losing their job or the ...


22

Your boss is likely referring to certain corporate cultural norms of the organization that are related to aspects of the people who are in charge. This is best answered with an example: For instance, let's say you're working for a family business. The owner if the business may have his/her children, or other relatives, working there in the organization. As ...


20

A greenfield project is simply a new project, not building on anything existing. The analogy is to building on a green field - there are no existing buildings or infrastructure. This is opposed to brownfield projects - which would involve changes and maintenance to an existing piece of work. The term is not unique to IT.


17

Work hours It is already in wide use, especially when talking about contracts. It also fits other units of time like weeks: work week. There is no man weeks, or at least I have not heard of such. Man hour is appropriate because of its history. Man is a synonym for worker in many jobs like soldiers and other physical labor; and to engineers and business men....


16

The term might seem outdated (especially in an increasingly secular society) but it is a generally accepted term for environmental events that are beyond human control, such as the weather or other natural events (including volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, tsunamis). It is a common term in the insurance industry too, and even people who are non-religious/...


16

First and foremost, you don't need to correct every mistake. Focusing on his pronunciation is likely causing you to miss some of the message he is trying to communicate to you. If your manager interacts with other English-speaking professionals, you would be doing him a favor by helping him learn to pronounce things correctly. Pronounce things correctly ...


15

"Simon, our CTO" would be better than any of your suggestions. Enderland is probably right that you're overthinking this; that said, in for a penny, in for a pound. The word "our" is more personal than the word "the" (Simon is not a fax machine) and has the added benefit of communicating that you identify comfortably as part of the team at Acme. Your ...


13

This obviously depends on the project and the company doing it - everybody has a different notion of 'free of constraints'. Typical characteristics can be: no prior project that one has to build on no 'legacy' code or data to deal with free choice of language, framework, infrastructure free choice of programming or management techniques no requirements ...


12

Workplace politics is a very human phenomenom that tends to arise in organizations with at least one degree of separation between an authoratative decision or goal, and the worker. In your typical chain of command in the US military, the President is the ultimate decision maker, however there are many layers of management between the president and the ...


12

This phenomenon that you are currently experiencing can be easily solved by more effective means than shaming your colleagues. Instead, try encouraging some basic meeting rules before you start. All meetings should have a clearly defined agenda. What are the topics to be discussed? The person leading the meeting should try to steer the conversation ...


12

Are there cubes and walls? If yes, then it is not an Open Space. Open Space is getting rid of cubes and walls:


12

That simply looks like a - very polite - rejection e-mail. If you are not convinced, you can try to reach out back asking if there is any specific feedback that they can provide about the interview, or if there is any other position open for which they feel you could be suitable. But other than that, I don't think there's much else you can do.


11

In reading the other answers, it seems to me that they try to skirt around the issue and circumvent the actual question by saying something like: "Resources" refers to more than just people, and the context of your situation is ambiguous (meaning your manager's response can be interpreted liberally, in a "non-offensive" way) This is missing the point ...


11

I've heard it called everything from "The cone of silence" to "The Iso-cube" to "The Bunker" to "Battle Stations" to "The Bat Cave" The name doesn't matter so much as the function. It should be clearly defined, and the rules laid out such as: Will meals and/or other accommodations will be provided? When (if at all) calls may be taken Cell phone usage ...


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