692

First, take a defensive position. Arrive 5 mins early, leave 5 mins late. (if possible) Don't go to HR, yet, although they may need to be called in. Normally, I'd say go to your coworker first, but this person is up to something and you don't want to tip him off. Take this up with your manager ASAP, as this is not about time, this is harassment. ...


387

Your manager's job is to manage you. You want to tell your manager that you will leave if he tries. This is going to be an adversarial discussion no matter what. If you want to get the point across without giving him an ultimatum, first you need to understand his reasoning, and then you need to gently explain yours. Whatever he says, respect his authority as ...


288

Most people have some sort of commitment that they have to attend after work. These could be making the carpool/train everyday, picking up the kids, or a once a week activity. There is nothing unprofessional about using an alarm reminding you that you need to dash. This isn't the case of somebody watching the clock, this is making sure that you don't miss ...


231

This is a direct attack and somewhat creepy. Talk to your manager about it. Ask your manager if this guy is supposed to be monitoring you in the bathroom etc,. and that it's weird and upsetting that he does and makes no secret of it and threatens you with it. You can move forwards from your managers reply. Your manager should at least talk to the guy. Best ...


224

Priorities need to be set by your boss. Talk to him about them. Yes that might mean the other customer waits longer, it is not your call. Another benefit of having your boss explicitly set your priorities is that they then can't blame you when both tasks are not done. If you haven't asked for guidance on which to do first, many bosses will assume you are ...


220

Isn't the real problem here that they are asking to have work meetings, outside of work hours? We have daily scrums slightly after the day starts so that people can get drinks/etc. and then do the meeting and focus on their day. I would argue that, given the meetings are for work, they should arrange them at the start of the work day and not before. Also ...


168

I am from a German background in which I was brought up to believe the following: Being early is being on time Being on time is being late Being late is unforgivable Questions: 1) What do you say to your manager/instructor when you're late? Do you just say "sorry I was late" or do you give a reason too even if not asked? You say "I'm sorry I was late, ...


159

Should I approach him about this behavior? I would only do this if this person is falling behind on their tasks, or their work quality worsens. You just said that this person is a "good employee otherwise, and he works a lot of hours", so I take it that this person actually works hard and delivers their tasks on time. If this is true, I see no reason why ...


158

The main question is why they (or anyone) should be in the office at 9:30. Do you (or the customer) need to contact the developers in the morning? Fixed schedules are mostly to make sure that people can be contacted or can meet each other and so closed groups only need to find a time that works for them. I also don't think they have fewer constraints. ...


141

how can I prove its value? You can't because it doesn't have any in that context. If you're using it to solve problems once in a while that's one thing, but if you're 'spending too much time' on it, then that is clear heads up from your boss to cease and desist. Your boss isn't attempting to open a dialogue about pros and cons, he/she is warning you to ...


141

I think you'd best get some kind of professional (medical) diagnosis for this. It is a lot easier to go to your boss with a medical term that they can, to some extent, relate to and appreciate, rather than a vague description that they might just think means "he feels lazy some days, and wants my permission to slack off".


141

You should already have asked for guidance at the very beginning, when you felt it was overwhelming - but better late than never. Immediately reach out to your superior / manager and make them aware of the situation. Ask for their guidance and suggestion on how to move forward, and what to be done / focused on to be completed in the time remaining. Is ...


127

I don't know the psychological term for this but when I was in university studying computer science I developed a bad habit of always playing random repetitive games on my phone or laptop while listening to lectures, things like minesweeper or tetris. The lecture had my full attention and I found without this I would feel jittery and not be able to ...


122

After reading interview questions about "describe a time when a project you have lead has failed" As an interviewer, if I asked this question I would be most interested in your role and how you learned from the experience. I would have no problem with you professionally pointing out that the project was doomed due to insufficient resources; companies not ...


119

Here is a professional way to address it. Next time he starts his explanations, again point out that you don't need to hear this level of detail, and say that you've told him that before. And then ask if there is a reason why he keeps coming back to this behavior anyway. Make him explain why he insists on telling you details that you've both agreed are ...


118

I don't mind busting my ass; I mind the sense of dread and emergency she approaches every conversation with because she's worried about the project timelines. It stresses me out and makes me feel uncomfortable for not giving her time estimates. So... How should I handle this? Give your best estimate. Avoiding one isn't helping you, and certainly ...


115

I am a retired engineer. During my 30 year career life, I had been in this kind of situation several times before. Hope my experience and advice can be helpful and useful. For those who never have this kind of experience before, your story is unimaginable. What? You have nothing to work on while other employees have to work overtime. I would like to assure ...


111

If she thinks that she can't get all the work done in those hours, and she feels all the work is important, then she should go to her boss and work out priorities for the work: what work is most important, and what work may not get done with less hours. Hi boss. Since I won't be able to get all my tasks done without overtime, what tasks are less ...


108

What problem is this trying to solve? Reception of this policy will entirely depend on whether the team perceives a problem with current state -- or not. A boss ramrodding this for no reason? It will cause a negative morale hit. Normally this sort of thing is up to a boss's discretion (and/or company policy), assuming no violations of local labor laws. ...


104

Unfortunately, you don't get to decide what activities are productive and unproductive - the manager does. The manager thought you would be good for this role and allocated resources (you) according to business need. The idea is that you would be effectively doing the task you were given. With regard to timesheet, to second the comments to OP, the hours ...


101

Reviewing old code and studying are both important for your personal development and (directly or indirectly) beneficial to the company. So I wouldn't call it 'inactive', which would imply you're just staring out of the window. That said, you should inform your boss immediately after finishing a task, so that he/she can decide if there are more pressing ...


99

As always, focus first on the work. Is it getting done? On-Time? Quality OK? Same as others? Remember that everyone takes breaks. For some it's a smoke, for others a trip to get coffee, for others a few minutes on Facebook. Be very careful about affecting morale in this area. It's incredibly hard not to manage this (or "micro-manage"), but looking at the ...


94

It's perfectly natural to struggle to concentrate on something which is not mentally stimulating to you. To answer your question - no, you're certainly not the only person who struggles with this. There is no one-size-fits-all solution, you just need to find something which works for you. One thing worth considering is the Pomodoro Technique. This basically ...


88

The reality is that any of our senior developers can walk out the door and have a new job with as much as 30-40% higher pay within a week. Most of us are only staying here for the casual environment, and being able to mix personal time into our work days. How can I let this manager know that he isn't in a position to have any expectations of us, beyond ...


87

The easiest approach is simply to direct the project managers to your manager (who I'm guessing is the product manager). Prioritizing work is your manager's job. If you're working on something for project manager A and project manager B comes to you with an "urgent" request, tell them you'd be happy to do so. You just need an email from your boss saying ...


85

I like Richard U's answer, but another tactic you might consider is to say, Let's go to our manager's office together to discuss this with him/her right now. Do so in a calm, helpful tone. I think you will learn how serious they are about reporting you. If they are serious and you go right then, I think (hope?) it will be clear to your manager how weird, ...


84

Go talk to a doctor or psychologist. Apart form this advice, do not listen to people on the internet saying things you should do Burnout is a serious affliction, not to be taken lightly.Your brain is overworked and things have broken down. This does not need to be permanent but it could be if you do not take care. That is not to say you have the full ...


78

Friend, you have shot yourself in the foot. "Unproductive"? To whom? Once upon a time, someone had to train you. Now you're the trainer -- so was the training you received unproductive? You have painted yourself in a corner by not billing those hours, and now that it has become the expectation, you have a problem with a situation that you helped to ...


75

It was unprofessional of your supervisor to tell you that. You have a train to catch. I work in a fairly casual office with lots of flex time, yet several people leave at specific times to catch transit options. If it's ever brought up again, tell your supervisor that you consider the criticism unprofessional and they are not respecting your time.


73

I'm assuming that advising you "just go on working" won't have much effect. The best compromise might be to try and find short, low-attention jobs that you can do around meeting time so you can instantly break off when you're called to the meeting and it won't matter if your mind isn't totally on the job. These might be mundane administrative or ...


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