New answers tagged

8

You're clearly a great resource for your colleagues. Here are some ideas of how to protect time for yourself while being respectful of the needs of your colleagues: Talk to colleagues that demand an exceptional amount of your time. Let them know you are glad you can be helpful, are always available for challenging problems, but encourage them to engage ...


3

You should make an effort to be in the office as much as possible and don’t make a habit of being late. If your current living situation makes certain start times difficult, talk with your manager about the issue and ask for an earlier/later start time. In the long run, you might consider moving closer to work. Working on a team is about more than getting ...


24

What can help me find a better balance between the two? As you do Scrum, there is a time and place to bring this up: The retrospective meeting. In the next retrospective meeting, talk about it. Talk about the fact that moving the daily stand-up to (let's say) 11:00 would improve your productivity. Find a solution with the team. They may not understand your ...


2

You could ask your manager or SCRUM master whether it would be possible to move the timeslot of the daily standup meeting to a time where you can easily attent because it aligns better with your lifestyle. In my team we had similar problems with a colleague of mine, who also had trouble being in the office on time for the daily standup meeting; and moving ...


6

If coming in late is okay for management, at least respect the meetings, i.e. be punctual for the scrum meeting or have them re-arranged to a later time. And suggest to management to make flexible times an official policy if it is not, such that your coworkers don't feel you're being singled out in having these freedoms.


2

Appointment based scheduling is a tool of managing the chaos. I caution against making it the basis of doing so. Requiring someone to fill out a ticket or schedule time may make perfect sense, but ultimately is somewhat off-putting nonetheless. You’re moving into more of a soft skill role. Try to keep in mind how any action, no matter how reasonable, ...


4

It depends on what kind of help is required on your part. Is it teaching new hires how the system works or is it just that you're more experienced and knowledgeable than your colleagues? In the first case you should have your manager know that some of your time will be dedicated to teaching and thus reduce your load or extend your deadlines. In the second ...


2

Didn't you answer your own question? As a result, my team has shown a lot of appreciation to me, the higher ups have noticed and given me lots of recognition, and I even received a couple of small bonuses for my work. The allowable thing to do is accomplish the work assigned to you. The "right" thing is to do as you're doing, assuming you're doing it ...


4

You've given us some clues as to what's going on here. You say that other devs, including seniors, give you work to do when they fall behind. You mention that you've gotten praise from the other devs, including higher ups for the quality of your work. You have earned the "right" to work on complex issues. This is not a 100% guaranteed analysis, just what ...


3

Research has shown that the "performance difference" between the high and low end of a job grade or salary band can be as much as an order of magnitude. Typically when you're at the high end of your band, performance-wise, that you're due for a promotion if you have the next high band worth of skills. That's the background. The short answer is that you do ...


11

The "right thing to do" is to take the time you need to do your tasks in a complete and sustainable way. This means that you don't stay till 10pm every night trying to get more and more done - this is unsustainable, you'll burn out and your company will lose you which is bad for you both. It also means that you don't say "wow, there's 6 hours left on this ...


9

At first, my reaction was "I highly doubt you report to all 3" - but then, I thought: hey, companies do weird stuff all the time. Maybe Stressed literally reports to 3 managers. So, right off the bat: you have my sympathies. That situation sounds like it sucks. That said... here's what I would personally do. I would draw up a work schedule, and send all ...


5

If you directly report to one of them then the answer is simple - do what they're asking and ask them to handle the other two for you (that's part of their job). If you directly report to someone who isn't one of the three, then go to them and ask for their support in dealing with the situation - use them as a gatekeeper between you and the Problem Three. ...


1

What you've described happens to those of us with "clout enough to 'sit them down'". The first thing you have to do is figure out which one of those three you actually work for. Meaning, who does things like performance appraisals, reviews, time sheet approval (if you have those), and so on. THAT is the manager you listen to. The others you refer to your ...


-2

Do you report to all 3? Ask the manager you report to for HIS/HER input. Get them to tell you what to work on.


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