308

Travel away from home is legally work time, unless it was done outside of regular working hours, and you were a passenger (that is, you were not driving yourself). If you have spent another 6 hours driving to the conference (presumably on a Sunday before), you should point to your manager that both trips are legally considered work time, and you should in ...


284

She's just a manager. She's not the company owner. There is HR, and there is your previous manager who is in a higher position than she is. So unless your previous manager always wanted to get rid of you and left the dirty deed to her, you are reasonably safe. "Attending the conference is a condition of your employment here" is extremely confrontational, ...


267

If in your first interaction with your new manager, that manager threatens to fire you for not cancelling an already approved PTO just to attend a conference, you clearly need to establish that you won't put up with that behavior. Any kind of negotiation that lets your manager get away with this would just mean more of the same in the future. If she's ...


241

I was in a similar position once (except in this case the coworker who was supposed to cover me was in an accident a week before my vacation was supposed to start). My boss asked me if I could postpone the trip. Like you, I had non-refundable tickets and some pre-paid non-refundable hotel reservations. So I said I'd postpone if they'd cover my out of pocket ...


223

The negative view is that they want you to be so addicted to creating things, that you work 80 hours a week for them without regard to your health and well-being. A positive view is that they want to see code samples and don’t know how to just ask for some Employers want to see passion and drive. Some companies call those things leadership qualities. ...


190

Usually for me, the following simple phrase suffices: I wasn't feeling too great yesterday, but am feeling a bit better today. Thank you for asking As your coworkers are supportive, the odds are they want to know that you're OK - you don't need to disclose any more than that to them. If you show gratitude for their concern and indicate that you're ...


162

No this is not common. Your manager is trying to take advantage of you. If the class is work related then it doesn't matter that you are not at work, it needs to be treated as a work day. You need to ask your manager to remove the day off as you will be attending a work related class. If he refuses, then inform him that you will not be attending a class ...


160

If you have to go, then notify him and go. Explain that it is urgent, and is dangerous to your health if you do not go. If possible, give him enough notice so there is coverage for your job (if your job requires it). Make sure you have some sort of documentation that you have done this. If you don't notify him, you can probably be fired for that. (Leaving ...


136

but I definitely feel like I shouldn't be here. Then don't be there, burn the rest of your sick days and vacations if needed. Anything else you decide to sacrifice your health for saving holidays/sick days/whatever, and that's just not a great idea.


133

Why guess? Send her an email or an IM asking her to clarify whether you’re needed.


127

Is this a reasonable request or something I should push back on? It's completely unreasonable to me. I would push back. And if that doesn't work, I might have a chat with HR to understand relevant company policy. If it hadn't ended early, you still wouldn't have been in the office. So there is no difference in days worked in either case. I think your ...


120

You are entitled to take your holidays, so the issue is with coming to an acceptable timeframe for your holidays. If the manager will not give you time off, try asking him to provide you with dates where he will approve days off. If this doesn't lead to an acceptable answer, try asking for money in lieu of leave. Odds are that this won't be accepted, but ...


120

As other answers have already touched upon this is a route towards being able to provide code samples that a free of any restrictions upon the candidate (no NDAs or anything to worry about). By far the larger factor however is that companies expect it simply because it's very often the case. Those who go on to become professional software developers often ...


117

You're not ethically obligated, especially since your boss didn't tell you to go in (extemporaneous remarks about her availability don't count). That said, it could be a wise move in terms of your future at the company. As you progress in your career, you probably won't always have someone telling you explicitly when to work and when not to work but you ...


113

Making your availability dependent on the scheduler talking to you is the sort of thing that can easily be forgotten. You ask for a way to change her behavior. Changing someone else's behavior is often harder than doing something different yourself. One option is to never be available on Tuesday. If most of your colleagues can get the nights off they need, ...


99

I'd like to know if I'm doing something clearly wrong Don't worry about it, it's out of your control. Go and make your peace. If it takes longer than you had thought it would, either say your goodbyes or contact work for a leave extension. I went to Australia for my mother when she went into a coma and only had a couple of days. It turned out she came out ...


98

Speaking as a R&D SW engineer who also does SW recruiting and interviewing (and who asks exactly that question)... SW often involves absurd levels of complexity and training. I want to hire someone who is going to be productive for years or decades. If SW is just a stepping stone to get inside the company and then leave for sales (a RL example) then ...


90

So in a situation like this, is it better to enforce company policy to be compliant? Or should I just quietly ignore this and pretend like I don't notice him coming in late? Neither :-). You should certainly not blindly enforce a company rule if you think it is not good. But you should also almost certainly not go behind your superior's back by quietly ...


90

Is it too much to ask for leaves for my own wedding?! Well, you can ask. You did. You were allowed to take the leave that is in your contract and you were denied leave that is not in your contract. You have no right to unpaid leave, the same way your employer has no right to tell you "I don't need you, I won't pay you for ten days, but you don't need to ...


83

You mention you're working in Belgium, and you mention those are "education" time-off. Being a fellow Belgian, this leads me to think that you're speaking about "Congé-éducation payé" / "Betaald educatief verlof". This time-off is indeed managed by the regional governments (Flanders, Wallonia, or Brussels), but the terms are agreed upon by all those ...


81

You should talk with your boss again. Mention that the policy you were given, hopefully in writing, but sounds like not, was first come first serve. You have already bought airline tickets and you will NOT be at work those days. Walmart is notoriously process driven, I would expect they have written policies regarding this. It sounds like you hold the ...


72

So Carl and Mike have to assume that he'll not attend and thus have a conference ticket to spare. Don't assume, ask. Eric already called in sick, so try contacting him by that same mean. Consider giving him a call in case there is a chance he won't see his email. Now, being written or spoken, try something in the lines of: Hello Eric. Sorry to hear you ...


70

Inform all your subordinates of a new rule, to make sure their requests do not get forgotten: Only requests by e-mail count. You can explain that you seem to have sometimes forgotten a request that was made verbally when you were concentrating on something else. If someone asks you verbally, remind them that they must send you an e-mail.


69

What are some techniques I could use to get better at this negotiation? First, it should never be a negotiation. Get the idea of negotiating one of your benefits out of your head. Learn and understand your rights as an employee, that way your manager or any other employee cannot walk all over you. Make sure you carefully read your contract and employee ...


65

Call him and ask him, first of all, if you can possibly cut your vacation. If he asks why, "personal reasons" should probably be enough. You do not need to provide him with the exact reason - especially since his answer could be "You had a hard time, please take some time to fix yourself". Unless you have a very open work relationship, he should not really ...


65

I don't know what your medical condition is - nor do I want to know. Submit the request in writing. Use email. Get the response in writing/email. Document. Document. Document. Most employers give PTO (paid time off). You don't have to tell them why you're taking a day or half-day. It is none of their business. If this applies to you I would ...


60

I usually leave them alone with their grief. The first time they come back from taking time off, the first thing I say is "I am sorry for your loss. If there is anything I or anyone of us can do to make things easier for you, let me know" Then it's back to the work both for them and for me - the idea is to give them some kind of healing through the routine ...


58

In the US, companies are under no federal1 obligation to provide any sort of paid vacation time. The concept of an employer paying you for time you're not actually working has many names and variations but these days people often use the umbrella term of "paid time-off" or PTO. The reason is that PTO often replaced the classic system of sick days and ...


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