Hot answers tagged

177

Put both on your resume so that the reader will have a good idea on what you’re doing AND that your company has an alternative title system. The reader can just then read the description to determine the details of your job e.g. Super Hip Company - Backend Engineer (Internal Title Code: Hadouken) Tuned and optimized SQL Queries to scale product up ...


140

You've been introduced and with a short explanatory note, which isn't false. It's just the same as they'd said "here's ereOn, he's our X developer". Since you are an expert on X, there's nothing special about this statement and there's nothing you need to be seen to be "reacting" to. Say hello or something, shake someone's hand maybe, and don't overthink ...


139

You have already talked to the manager about a salary increase and it hasn't happened. You should be job searching. Any time you bring up more money there is the implication that you will take steps if you're not taken care of. This hasn't happened, and if you let it go there is no incentive to give you more money, you have no new leverage. Your situation ...


77

I’m going a bit against the grain of other answers to suggest, it doesn’t mean turn and run, indeed it may not mean anything, but that it is a reason to pause for a moment of caution. It’s true that in the future, employers may not even see that title and even if they did, most wouldn’t give it weight relative to your actual skills and accomplishments. ...


62

The company also says that they won't be able to verify employment in references if we list ourselves as our old title and someone calls mentioning that. That seems extremely unlikely. Perhaps a foolish HR Rep might say something like "no, that's not the current title" and tell the potential employer the made-up nonsense title. But I seriously doubt ...


53

Don't do 3. Refusing to do work you are capable of and that is not considered an undue burden will get you fired for cause real quick in most places of the world. As you say, you have issues to deal with in your private life, this will not make things easier. Firmly ask for more money and a title change, while searching for a better job simultaneously. ...


49

I started out thinking that this was the relevant Dilbert cartoon, but it is more insidious. The company also says that they won't be able to verify employment in references if we list ourselves as our old title and someone calls mentioning that. Their solution to turnover is to try and render you unemployable elsewhere Keep the old title on your ...


44

Since your new employers will ask your old employer what you did, the right way of saying this is: Web Developer (System Administration responsibilities) That way they know your title, and what you actually did.


38

Find Power To be in a position of power you must have options. "They" (your employer) have options, namely firing you, doubling your pay, demoting you, "constructive dismissal" (making you want to leave so they don't have to fire you), requiring your resignation, promoting you, or leaving you alone...and surely many more. What options do you have? I have ...


37

To take a slightly different view of this than the other answers, the last thing you should consider doing is going back to 100% front-line breakfix, because these other duties you complain about are a golden opportunity. (Unless you want to be a helpdesk technician your whole career... and even if you do, refusing to do "other duties as assigned" will ...


31

It is possible that a particular company may use those titles to mean different things and to describe different positions within that company. But I do not believe that there is a clear distinction between them which is common across different companies. Personally I have had all three of "developer", "programmer" and "engineer" as titles in different ...


29

Actually, the titles are used interchangeably at some places, and at some places they are given a different set of responsibilities to each. An excellent answer from Quora: "Head of " is orthogonal to VP/Director type titles, because the "Head of " means that one is the highest-ranking specialist at a given time, whereas Director and VP refer to ...


27

It's not a big deal at all. You make your resume, not your employer. There's nothing stopping you from putting "Full Stack Developer" on your resume. Nobody's ever going to go "wait a minute...his resume said this, but they're telling me it was a Java Developer." And even if they did, you could just say, "That's a more accurate description of what I did and ...


24

Possibly a Sabbatical, so your job title is <Whatever you are now> although this usually means a break from a single position, which is then returned to. Combining this with "Taking a sabbatical to travel", however, is something you can definitely talk about and justify. Alternately perhaps consider your "Time consuming personal projects" as starting ...


22

Nothing wrong with just smiling politely (maybe a simple "hi" or "hello") - it's what I do - modesty is too easily interpreted as false modesty, and the other option is easily seen as an ego trip. You then go on to prove you're an expert by simply being awesome. As Anthony has pointed out in the comments - the appropriate response is situation-based. I'd ...


21

It looks very bad. You had a senior management title (Director) and were demoted to grunt. It shows your company did not respect you and was willing to shove you aside while doing it. If you accept the position it will appear to many that you do not respect yourself or your abilities either. As someone reviewing resumes its a red flag. Why would ...


21

during this period, what would be a meaningful "job title"? Since your plan is to wait one whole year before actively seeking new employment, then during that year you won't have a job. So "meaningful job title" has no real meaning in this context. You won't have a job, hence no job title. Most CVs/resumes I have read would just leave a gap in the ...


21

We get a lot of questions about inaccurate job titles, and the answer is pretty much always the same. You put the job title used by your employer on your résumé, so nobody can accuse you of padding or falsifying past employment And you make damn sure the description of the role underneath the title describes your actual work Frankly, most potential ...


20

As a hiring manager, I've gotta say titles are a bit of an afterthought. Personally, I talk to candidates sometimes about their desired title so their official title matches what they were expecting. Sometimes this isn't feasible when we have a standard title for everybody in a certain position (which sounds like your situation). You are free to reword ...


20

Option 4: Write up a little spreadsheet showing all your responsibilities and the time it takes you to do them (which is presumably over 40 hours a week), then take it to your manager and ask them to rank your duties. Then do what they say for 40 hours a week, being sure to keep them in the loop if and when low-priority tasks get dropped on the floor. That ...


20

A common choice in this situation is "Founder". It conveys that you're working for your own startup, without giving an impression about the size of your company (you could be the sole employee, or you could be Mark Zuckerburg, or anywhere in between). If you have a specific focus in your career then "Founder and CEO", "Founder and CFO", "Founder and CTO" ...


19

If resetting expectations isn't an option and the skill gap is too significant, the normal option is to let the employee go. In most places, going from "senior" to "junior" will result in a whole host of problems, such as: Do you reduce pay? Most people won't want a pay cut but most "seniors" are paid more than "juniors" Hurting that individual's ...


18

I use my official title (for reference checking) and then put the title I should have had in parenthesis () after it.


16

If I put a job title and length of service, will prospective employers assume I have done that role for the whole period? Yes, they will. A role against a period would indicate that you have done that role throughout the period. And if so should I make it clear that I wasn’t always a Senior Banana in Company A? Yes, you should. The thing to do is split ...


16

Remember that the higher title does come with higher expectations. A year that exceeds expectations for one level may barely meet expectations for the next level up. Moving up when you aren't ready to do so may make you look worse rather than better.


15

This must be a joke, if it is, it's pretty funny. Just wait a couple of days If it's really a joke, everyone will know in a couple of workdays. If after a couple of workdays, you still think your boss was serious, then do the following. Document everything Email your HR (or the second in command) to ask if your boss was serious or not. Keep all the ...


14

This sounds a bit like you work as some sort of DevOp DevOps (a clipped compound of development and operations) is a culture, movement or practice that emphasizes the collaboration and communication of both software developers and other information-technology (IT) professionals while automating the process of software delivery and infrastructure changes. ...


13

Use your title as anyone doing a reference check may throw you out if it doesn't match what the reference check says. If you feel the title is too far off, add the realistic title of what you did in parentheses after the official title. Then explain why you did that in the cover letter. What you want to do is make sure the description of the job includes ...


13

Is a job title a negotiable element of an entry level position at larger companies? Here's the thing to understand about negotiations: You need to have something to negotiate with. Always ask yourself "What do I have that I can offer to get what I want or take away if I don't get what I want?" If the answer is nothing then understand that nothing is ...


13

I would say this situation is very well suited to quitting gracefully. Quitting at a random time, with no warning, is a little unprofessional (but still your prerogative.) However, simply being asked to move to a different position, be it up, down, or laterally, is a great opportunity to quit in a professional manner. Simply decline the new position, for ...


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