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176

Put both on your resume so that the reader will have a good idea on what you’re doing AND that your company has an alternative title system. The reader can just then read the description to determine the details of your job e.g. Super Hip Company - Backend Engineer (Internal Title Code: Hadouken) Tuned and optimized SQL Queries to scale product up ...


64

The company also says that they won't be able to verify employment in references if we list ourselves as our old title and someone calls mentioning that. That seems extremely unlikely. Perhaps a foolish HR Rep might say something like "no, that's not the current title" and tell the potential employer the made-up nonsense title. But I seriously doubt ...


49

I started out thinking that this was the relevant Dilbert cartoon, but it is more insidious. The company also says that they won't be able to verify employment in references if we list ourselves as our old title and someone calls mentioning that. Their solution to turnover is to try and render you unemployable elsewhere Keep the old title on your ...


20

A common choice in this situation is "Founder". It conveys that you're working for your own startup, without giving an impression about the size of your company (you could be the sole employee, or you could be Mark Zuckerburg, or anywhere in between). If you have a specific focus in your career then "Founder and CEO", "Founder and CFO", "Founder and CTO" ...


15

This must be a joke, if it is, it's pretty funny. Just wait a couple of days If it's really a joke, everyone will know in a couple of workdays. If after a couple of workdays, you still think your boss was serious, then do the following. Document everything Email your HR (or the second in command) to ask if your boss was serious or not. Keep all the ...


12

There seem to be two issues that cause you frustration, which I'd suggest are best separated: Give your lead feedback on how his broken commits are affecting the team and suggest an alternative. Don't compare yourself to the other lead, but ask your manager on what you need to progress in the company. Give feedback You have a very clear cut case on how ...


9

You are starting this question from the position of: Joe got promotion but Jane deserves it much more. How can she use that in an argument? In reality we should assume that promotion and demotion decisions are based not on "who deserves it" but on business needs and value to the company. I put quotes around "deserve" because that is your opinion and you ...


9

Just a thought, this may not apply in your case, but: In the UK, employment law says you can't make a role redundant and employ someone else in that role for at least 6 months - one way around this that a savvy company may try (and I've worked for such a company previously) is to give each employee a different title - giving the ability to make any one of ...


7

Your title is not the most relevant thing in your LinkedIn / resumé as this can vary GREATLY in the market, even between big companies - and the tiles can also be very vague and generic, e.g. Operations Manager can mean VERY different things between companies. The most important thing for the recruiters to have some idea of what you can actually do is to ...


7

As is already mentioned. Just ask. Make sure they understand that it is not a secret way of getting even more money. You are just thinking about the title. It could be though that it is coupled to you salary. Many companies job titles (although this is probably cultural) are coupled to certain salary scales. So that could be a reason for them not to agree. ...


7

To add to the excellent answer about documentation: keep some old pay stubs. If company says you didn’t work there, you can show that they are lying. (And maybe you even have the old job title on it.). Also, if you still have it, the transfer/promotion/job offer that has the old title.


6

I asked if this is the "director-level role" they and I had discussed in the past and was told yes, but usually, what's the difference between the titles? In general, titles and their meaning vary greatly depending on each company and what they expect and how they define such title. However, in this specific case, team lead and director could be separate ...


6

Optimise your resume for the reader. Only put exactly the information they need in there. This obscure job title from your current employer is just noise. It benefits nobody to include it - it only risks misunderstanding. Make things as easy as possible for the hiring manager who will read your resume. They'll have many to read with limited time. Use the ...


5

When reviewing your CV, titles are less important than experience. On the resumes I've seen and wrote myself, title always followed by brief description of responsibilities. Ultimately, it doesn't matter, how your position is called. You shouldn't fake promotions, so perhaps something like: Associate (MMYY-MMYY): did X, Y, was responsible for Z ...


5

The best way to answer this is probably to ask those staff who are having the disagreement: What do they see as the significant difference between the two? Or are they simply arguing because no one is sure what the difference is? In my experience, "Acting" means the temporary person is filling in for a Director who has (for whatever reason) taken leave. ...


5

I've used "Principal" in a similar situation ... clients and potential clients responded well. Founder is certainly an option, but if you're a solo it just seems pretentious. My $0.02 ...


5

I would list it as "Made occasional minor contributions to <project>." I would give such a resume a slight edge in the hiring process, because it shows you find it valuable to improve things for the next person, and to contribute to an ecosystem from which you benefit. It wouldn't weigh as heavily as full-time experience though. A lot of people want ...


4

I had similar experience before. At the time, it was indeed frustrating. But later in your career, you may find that this experience adds great value to your CV. Take myself as an example. Because I had these "extra duties", I get to put "I lead the change of xxx in yyy company. This results in ....". And this not only differentiates you from the sea of ...


4

Of course you may negotiate your job title. Generally, it costs your future employer nothing to give you a title that reflects your level of responsibility. You certainly should ask. If you'll deal with customers or the public, or submit papers to journals, a "higher" title can help your credibility. That's why banks have so many vice presidents. Be ...


4

Correct it in the background check to a generic Credit Intern, chances are you'll be fine. But there's nothing else you can do unless asked. In which case you can make an explanation Best not to draw attention to it otherwise. It's fairly minor at the end of the day and job titles are company specific, in this case the company itself doesn't know what the ...


4

The meaning of the title will vary from context to context - your best bet is to discuss with an HR rep if you're unclear. That said, the word "associate" is commonly used in two scenarios in traditional engineering firms. In both cases it implies "junior" but the context is very different: as a modifier to a title, i.e. associate engineer meaning junior ...


4

It's company-specific. I previously worked for a large aerospace company. Associate {Discipline} Engineer was the lowest level, typically a recent college graduate with little to no internship experience. {Discipline} Engineer was the next level and was where college graduates with some experience were hired. And from there, you would progress up to Senior ...


4

I'm thinking what I am describing would be something along the lines of "Lead Developer", I've also hear the term "Principle Developer". Either of these is fine, don't overthink it. Your job title in a position like this means very little in the long (or even short) term. Your responsibilities and professional reputation are what's important.


4

I would agree for the most part with Player One but with one slight change: the Leadership roles do stand out. My company uses "Lead Developer" and "Lead Engineer", where developer is typically programming specific and engineer includes programming as well as infrastructure work. But like Player One says, don't over-think this. Either title will be fine. ...


4

Don't get fixed on the title. What you need to look at are responsibilities and recognition (including pay). You need to build arguments that you're essentially doing the job the previous person did but better. The first justification is that you have been given the duties and the team associated with the responsibilities but you should also provide more ...


4

LinkedIn titles - and job titles in general - aren't a formal list of accredited roles. You can be a software developer with no formal training. You can be a Product Manager in one company doing what a Project Manager will do in another, simply because they use a different nomenclature. (An important caveat, mentioned by @GregoryCurrie, is that in some ...


3

This depends on the automation you are going for. There is QA automation, Automation in general, Infrastructure automation, Robotics process automation, Continuous deployment and Continuous integration (which is deployment automation). Rather than focusing on the title, I recommend fine tuning your description, to make sure applicants know what sort of ...


3

In a "scientific" discussion, they would be called generically "intrapreneurs", especially if the activity is started at their initiative. Intrapreneurship is inside companies what entrepreneurship is outside companies. What are these people called in each company? They can be called any way the company wants, even if their title does not fit their job. ...


3

I know a few people who are owner-operators of consultancy businesses who give themselves a job title that describes their day-to-day job. Two on my network are 'Senior Project Manager' and 'Human Resources Consultant"


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