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2

When I started my one-man consultancy, I used Managing Director (the accurate legal title in the country in question) when doing business as myself. However, when acting as a hired gun for my previous employer and dealing with their clients, I continued to use the same title I used to have when employed there. The fun thing with small companies, though, is ...


3

I know a few people who are owner-operators of consultancy businesses who give themselves a job title that describes their day-to-day job. Two on my network are 'Senior Project Manager' and 'Human Resources Consultant"


5

I've used "Principal" in a similar situation ... clients and potential clients responded well. Founder is certainly an option, but if you're a solo it just seems pretentious. My $0.02 ...


20

A common choice in this situation is "Founder". It conveys that you're working for your own startup, without giving an impression about the size of your company (you could be the sole employee, or you could be Mark Zuckerburg, or anywhere in between). If you have a specific focus in your career then "Founder and CEO", "Founder and CFO", "Founder and CTO" ...


2

This isn't good employment. A good employer respects your time off, compensates you satisfactorily, and would encourage you to get help to deal with a performance dip after a death in the family through proper treatment. If you're in the US and you qualify, consider using FMLA to get some psychiatric help. Therapy can help you grieve effectively and ...


0

Would it be reasonable to ask if they can change the title to include "senior," without any changes in compensation? You can attempt to negotiate anything that is important to you. Your specific request is reasonable. But that doesn't mean the company will make the desired change. Some companies are very flexible with titles, others are very structured. ...


4

Of course you may negotiate your job title. Generally, it costs your future employer nothing to give you a title that reflects your level of responsibility. You certainly should ask. If you'll deal with customers or the public, or submit papers to journals, a "higher" title can help your credibility. That's why banks have so many vice presidents. Be ...


7

As is already mentioned. Just ask. Make sure they understand that it is not a secret way of getting even more money. You are just thinking about the title. It could be though that it is coupled to you salary. Many companies job titles (although this is probably cultural) are coupled to certain salary scales. So that could be a reason for them not to agree. ...


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