719

You did exactly what was instructed, and took scores from "barely passing" to mastery. Emphasize that. If your boss won't bend, offer to take the game down. Meanwhile, you may want to update your resume, taking scores from 68% to 96% is something that gives you HUGE bragging rights. I would also suggest seriously thinking about making educational games ...


255

You're approaching this with a waterfall mindset: First she learns everything she needs to know, and then applies it to your in-house stuff. The thing is waterfall doesn't work. You don't know what you need to know until you're doing it, and by guessing at the start you can waste a LOT of time and money, which you're seeing now. Instead, consider assigning ...


235

My opinion is you should start getting less excited about this new job. Several red flags: Lack of an on site interview A murky breakfast that is really a meeting A reprimand for your performance when you are not even working there yet You did not meet his expectations? - he did not define expectations It is not reasonable for him to have ...


213

While it's not immediately your fault that people are spending too much time on the game, as the developer, you could help the situation. Turn off the scoreboard server/disable the game entirely for now. Go to your boss and show the increased test scores to show what benefit it has brought. Work with them to create a middle ground where employees are still ...


177

I'll address the elephant in the room here: You have a trainee. And you refuse to train her. Instead you sent her to please train herself and come back when done. That's not going to work. If that would work, she'd be master-nobel-prize-winning-chief-of-whatever-you-do before she even started at your company, because there really is no shortage of "...


175

How can I give my coworker the training in the time I have left? You don't, this is your boss's job to assign not yours. When you resign from the company, your boss will decide who ( if anyone ) will be trained to fill your role. They will also decide if you will be the one doing the training or not.


166

I don't think you've correctly identified the problem. You weren't "too good" at your job, you simply performed a task without specific requirements. There were no guard rails. I don't think this is inherently your fault, but there are definitely steps you can take to avoid this. Focusing on your successes and trying to pass this off as something to brag ...


105

Why would you stay polite to a guy who pressures you into doing steroids? Those things have very little effect for the average casual gym-goer and lead to a host of issues in multiple organs at worst. And I guess he is not your boss, so there are no repercussions to firmly saying no. It wouldn't be a bad idea to notify HR too. Someone peddling illegal ...


90

Yes, it is unreasonable to expect you to act like an employee when you are, in fact, not yet an employee. Based on your description of the situation, you acted in a completely reasonable way. Of course, not everybody might feel that way, as you can see. What should you do? What does your gut tell you? What are the possible/probable consequences of declining ...


89

Frame-challenge: Unless the thought of having to pay back for that course makes you seriously reconsider accepting the new job offer - don't ask at all. Asking makes it possible that someone will think about it when they may not have done so before. If you'd accept the new job even if you have to pay back for the course, then just accept the new offer, ...


86

Present the training activity to both the trainee and your managers as improving the bus factor. It is prudent to have at least two people capable of doing any job. Talk to your manager first, so that you are certain who they want you to train. Training the wrong person could create an extremely difficult situation when you resign. Training person X would ...


79

The way to patch things up is to offer solutions for the problems that upper management, your boss, and yourself have identified with the new training. If people are spending too much time, restrict it in a way that they can still complete the training. Show your boss that you are dependable to provide solutions to problems. Also remember that there is ...


74

Short answer: You should bring it up with your employer! I know you said that you don't know how to raise this, but you are being sexually harassed by the customers. This is not your fault. And likely, your boss doesn't know anything about this. The first thing you need to do is to ask for a one on one with your boss and tell them exactly what happened. ...


71

There are plenty of courses on how to train people, some online, some are from real-world learning institutions. I don't think you have time for this. So, let's get started with a 10 minute crash course. Document the processes: Your starting point is going to be your product documentation. Every detailed step, every reference, every additional technology ...


70

So, am I being unreasonable? Needlessly antagonistic? No. You've been offered a deal and you're performing "due consideration". As any deal offer requires. I've been told this is a 'standard' requirement 'these days', is that true? It's a standard to require such agreements. It's not a standard to accept them blindly. This is your answer here: I'...


63

Did you ask those who complained about the way your code was structured about how they themselves would have structured it? You might as well look for mentors where you can find them - that is, right among your critics. Anyone who criticizes your work should be made to pay a price, the price being that you get to pick their brains. They would have to tell ...


61

Do you plan to leave? Refusing to sign the contract will not actually be a clear signal to your managers that you plan to leave; it will be a clear signal that you do not want to sign that contract and find it objectionable. Being human, though, they will naturally come up with reasons why you probably find it objectionable. To a certain extent, you can't ...


61

No, it is not wise to opt out of this training. There are several reasons for this: First and foremost, even if the training is stupid and useless, your manager has chosen it, and chosen to offer it to you. Declining says "you're wrong, actually, that training is quite useless." This is rarely a wise thing to say to your employer. It is for this reason I ...


60

The basic strategy here is to get her alone, and identify what her core issues are. Using this strategy you will try to get her to seperate emotions from facts, and plans from personalities. If she is a valuable member of your team, then her opinion should be equally valid. Schedule some time with her (a couple of hours at least), and hear her out. It will ...


58

I was in a similar situation once. The company was bringing in trainers for a period of 2 months. The team was supposed to work with the trainers two days a week during that time. The company passed a document around that the training was mandatory and said that if we quit then we need to repay the training costs which was around $2k. Everyone was told ...


56

This is usually why new starters are taken out for lunch or shown the ropes by members of their team. If no one appears to have offered, there's nothing wrong with doing so yourself, or suggesting it to someone else. The informal lunch setting, sometime during the first week, is the perfect time to bring up the things you won't find written down anywhere. ...


49

As a data specialist, I would be extremely annoyed if someone wanted to try to make me into an application dev for the bus factor. That is just shortsighted on the part of your management. It is like asking an accountant to train to do HR. I only bring this up because you are likely to face resistance from these people. I also bring it up because they are ...


49

I had a similar issue when I worked in a contact center for a large software company in the UK. When I started only management had two monitors. I mentioned the benefits to the internal IT support and was laughed at, being advised people over the last five years had asked and never gotten anywhere. The business were not receptive enough to the idea of ...


49

To pick the only point that is actually answerable in our current format: I've been told this is a 'standard' requirement 'these days', is that true? Yes, that is pretty standard. Many companies do that, for all training and all employees. This is not about you or your specific training, this is likely a company-wide policy. As for the actual decision? ...


49

He probably just wants to sell you the products, so the same way you would say no to a waiter offering you a dish you don't want, a polite but firm "No, thanks" should work. Showing doubts or evasive answers will only make him insist again and again. By the way, protein and other suplements are OK, but steroids are illegal drugs, I don't know if there is a ...


49

So you asked a person not familiar with your tech because she probably never came in contact with it how long it will take her to be proficient. And then you created a schedule around this estimation. Estimating time especially in programming is incredibly hard. Giving a spot on Estimation might even be harder than programming itself. So now this Trainee ...


47

First off, people skimming through training modules is...(shhh, don't say anything)...very common. That was never your problem. As for the behavior of Boss, that's may not be entirely your problem. You were assigned a task and the outcome was not what management expected. Here's you major decision point, did Boss review and approve what you delivered? ...


46

Ask You really have nothing to lose. By asking you show that you are motivated to learn, ready to research where you can do so and by checking for group discounts you show that you are not doing it for purely egoistical reasons (which would be ok, too). If your boss declines your request, nothing bad happened. You can still do this privately. If you have ...


44

IF you're going to advocate for training, do not advocate for time to read books or work on little projects. Those are in fact things you can do on the job. When you need to write some code to do X in the big project, you can go read about X in a book (or online) and make a little proof of concept (or spike, if you prefer) that does X to get familiar with it ...


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