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It's quite common for teams to start using some sort of tool in an ad-hoc fashion and learn how to use it as they go along. Over time, they figure out how best to use it for their needs. You've been using it for 18 months, so there are probably more positives than negatives. You've already identified some valid points and have ideas. Your next step would be ...


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You've implemented a new and unfamiliar application to the team with no training what so ever. To make matters worse you re-enforced his behavior/improper Teams etiquette by actually responding to the questions that are posted in the group. While the concept of channels and groups may be second nature to you it's obviously not for your co-worker. Perhaps a ...


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From my experience, your suggestions will not ever work. If he is "that kind of" Senior I believe he is, he won't take "that green youngling" too seriously. So, what to do? The training and "urge to apply that training" must come from above. It sounds like you are in some kind of SCRUM environment or at least agile. So, to speak in scrum terms, which ...


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Ask your Manager if you could make a simple guide for him as to what channel to ask for what etc. And ask your Manager to give a gentle reminder to him if your suggestion/reminder is ignored by him.


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Talk to the boss of the manager you're replacing about the hand off. Ask them how they think it should be handled since they are likely the ones in charge of how it should be handled. If necessary get their response in writing and forward it to the manager you're replacing.


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I would not rely on the person you are replacing. It happens very often in the situations where they simply do not care to put in the time or effort, so if you want to effectively take over then I would drive it as much as possible. Even to the point of speaking with who will be your supervisor and asking what their expectations will be for you in your new ...


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So what happened: Employees took 10 minutes to skim through training courses that should take four hours. You are tasked to do something and are 100% successful - employees now take four hours as they should, and learn much better. Then upper management figures out that employees now take four hours to take the course, as they should, instead of taking 10 ...


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For the record, this is not uncommon for a company to protect itself like this. I don't think it would matter who is providing the training, it is still a cost to the company (though it is important for other reasons). Though such agreements should from as part of an employment contract. An unsigned agreement is worth nothing. If you have already signed a ...


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