Hot answers tagged

136

This is one of those rare questions where the title captures it perfectly and the extra context doesn't add much at best and confuses things at worst. is it ok to ask to stay a while longer to check out the area? Yes, of course! If I'd avoid anything, it's over-sharing personal details like your plans to visit friends, view apartments, etc. This stuff ...


96

Is it ok to ask to stay through the weekend and fly out Sunday instead of Friday so I can scout out the area? If you are paying for the flights, then there is no need to ask anything. If the hiring company is paying for the flights, it's perfectly reasonable to ask if you can fly on the days you prefer, as long as that doesn't add any expense to the ...


94

Your specific question was, My question is whether this is an appropriate thing to ask of my prospective employer in the first place, and if so, how I would go about phrasing this question. Given how eager the employer is to support your decision making process, it seems perfectly reasonable that you would want to bring your significant other along - ...


25

To me, this is absolutely fine. You've got a good reason for your request, and it's not going to cost the company any money (in fact, quite possibly the opposite). That said: you want to be on top form for your interview. I certainly wouldn't want to do an interview after taking a middle of the night flight, because you're going to be sleep deprived from ...


17

It's not practical to ask for a company car for a week. The distance could, depending on travel time, be considered beyond what might be expected as reasonable. For example, a 40-mile drive from say St Albans to Reading, that's a lot of heavy traffic and very busy roads and would easily take 90 minutes or more each way, more if there was a problem en route....


16

I have a similar issue in my place of work where we're expected to pay for work-related travel expenses and then claim it back (no matter how much). I found that telling my boss that I can't go to the meeting / conference / whatever because I can't afford the fare has them flashing the corporate credit card quicker than you can say "pay up!" ... there is ...


16

See a doctor, get a formal diagnosis of your disability for your employer. If you’ve gotten a formal diagnosis of a disability, your employer is obligated under the ADA to offer reasonable concessions to compensate for your disability; if you’re not from America, most OECD nations should have similar laws. So, my advice to you would be to get a doctor to ...


14

Between jobsites, yes but not between your home and the first/last site. California defines the term “hours worked” as “the time during which an employee is subject to the control of an employer, and includes all time the employee is suffered or permitted to work, whether or not required to do so.” I.W.C. Wage Orders, Section 2


13

My problem is that I feel guilty pawning this project onto a colleague. I don't want bad blood between us. Should I confront him an apologize? I don't see any compelling reason for you to have to apologize (for what?) with this coworker. You already delayed an important family event to attend the first time, and managed to postpone it to another date. A ...


13

You should report to both companies. As a security clearance holder, your responsibility to report foreign travel is to the government, not to a particular company. Your company's security officer is just who you work through to report anything you need to. Depending on your clearance, you are usually required to report planned foreign travel before the ...


13

How does one prepare for this? Perhaps the most important thing is to keep calm and be yourself and don't pretend/boast. I also suggest you ask your boss if there is anything you should prepare or do before the trip and meeting. Regarding attire, you should most definitely suit up, specially when going to important meetings like this. Now, I must say a ...


12

Since your husband was on official business and was driving the car as a matter of performing his job duties, his employer should pay for the damages. This is just as the employer would be liable for any damages that might occur in the workplace as the result of the actions of one of their employees. As you said, he wouldn't have even been there to hit the ...


11

Is it typically acceptable to ask for a day off Yes, it's typically acceptable to ask. Be prepared for how you will choose to react if they are not typical and don't grant the day off. Then, consider if this extra work is likely to be a regular part of the job, and if that fits into your lifestyle or not.


10

I'd say, re-check your contract. Most of the cases, the clause is, if you chose to leave the company (resign), you have to pay it back. If the company chooses to terminate your tenure for any reason, you need not to refund anything. Given the scenario, answer to your questions: 1. Would I need to pay for the business trip if the company terminates me ...


10

Yes, it is acceptable to ask. Whether they'll agree or not - depends on company policy. Also, as mentioned in the linked answer, before asking, double check the details already provided to you, whether the answer is already available or not.


10

I think it's about framing. If you say "I have some friends in the area I was hoping to visit soon anyway, and I've noticed that the return flight is cheaper on Sunday, would it be OK to fly back then instead?" then it sounds very reasonable and not presumptuous, in my opinion. As an added bonus they may like that you already have some connection to the ...


9

I'd certainly expect "travel time" to encompass the entire trip. So if you work 50 weeks a year and have to take 5 business trips a year each of which lasts 1 week (say, visiting a client as part of a project), that would be 10%. You could have more shorter trips or fewer longer ones, of course, but I'd expect that it meant something like "1 out of 10 ...


8

I don't think "order" is the correct terminology here. I'd say, they will "require" you to go and work at a client site, for which they can place a formal requirement. However, you can still open up a conversation and express your concerns / disagreement about the proposal, there's nothing stopping you from that. Given that you are a full-time employee and ...


8

In general you can't refuse work trips. Whether it's to get training on something, to visit a client, to attend the company's conference, or to come to head office to meet your colleagues, once management decides you should do it, you need to do it. Ideally they would make the travel experience pleasant - a flight on a reasonable airline, a reasonable hotel ...


7

To refuse, just tell them "No". You can say you're too busy if you'd like. But realistically, this is not about you. It's about the company wanting to get everyone in a place together and build the team. If you all have to suffer through a common experience, you have something to bond you. They likely know it's difficult on you to do, but they ...


7

You forgot to mention your country, so I assume it is the U.K. Your company should reimburse your travelling cost which is 45p per mile driven, tax free.


7

In theory, it costs nothing to ask. The worst that could happen is they say "no". However, were I in that situation, my view would be as follows: If the company will reimburse me for travel expenses they will tell me - and they will spell out exactly what is covered. If they don't tell me a cab to/from the airport on my side is included, I'm going to ...


6

Is this a common practice, or am just at the mercy of an unfortunately stingy contracting firm? You are at the mercy of whatever contract you signed and the legal practices of the firm you work for. As you wrote "Just keep track of your expenses and you will be reimbursed in an upcoming paycheck" is basically the understanding [you] have. I agree that ...


6

Since your problem is the commute, look for ways to avoid it/ make it productive. Example: stay a place closer to work location listen to podcasts, read technical sites etc if travelling via metro etc watch technical videos if the traffic conditions permit take occasional work from home to avoid commute accumulate some leaves, then take personal time off ...


5

Sounding too excited may come across as being too much about your desires and not about the companies needs. I would say something like "I am well aware that this position could(would) involve travel and that is not a problem for me at all". If they ask about your travel experience after that, you could go into more detail to show that you can easily ...


5

This time they would like me to be onsite for 20 hours per week. Is this an unorthodox request? It isn't. Clients often request or require that contractors work on site at the location of their choosing. I recently worked on site for a client for 13 months. This is pretty standard stuff. Nevertheless, I understand your concerns. Have you expressed these ...


5

At my company, we are allowed to submit for airfare before the trip because, as you noted, it can be quite large. If they won't do prior reimbursement, then submit for it as soon as you fly. Like that morning, while you are waiting at the gate. Be prepared for future flights, and push for them to pay for the ticket.


5

I'd be a little surprised if the company want to book the ticket and the accommodation from their side. In general, for these sort of visits before you become an employee of the company, usually they use the reimbursement model. That means, you'll have to pay for the expenses now, and once you submit the voucher / invoices, they will pay you the agreed upon ...


5

It is ok to ask to stay longer to check out the area. Do not say you have friends there or they might conclude THAT'S why you said yes to the interview. Tell them you will pay for any extra on the flight costs incurred as well as take care of your own accommodation costs while in town. That's businesslike as it shows forethought, seriousness, and cost ...


5

What you gotta do is get in touch with your boss first thing in the morning, explain that you would rather get out of the travel and ask if that would be a lot of trouble. To the question of "why": be honest. Explain that flying makes you uneasy, and 20h+ trip is way past your comfort zone. You can add that it's very likely that after 20h out uneasiness like ...


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