378

So my question is, is it normal for recruitment agents to send out job offers without any details? In my experience, that is not at all normal. I've never encountered it personally, nor have I ever heard of it before. As a hiring manager, I never required anything like it from applicants. If not, what details should I expect in a proper job offer? I ...


179

Don't do it! No, it's not normal. Seeing how likely an offer is to fall through (better candidate found, bad fit, etc.) you should never put all your eggs in one basket, even if you actually had been given a full job description. Best case, the job is real and something that interests you and something you're qualified for and you actually get an offer. ...


142

It is not "unethical". It is just business. They're in the business of making money. Simple as that. They'll pay their suppliers as little as possible, they'll pay their staff as little as possible. They'll charge their customers as much as possible. The definition of "as possible" varies from company to company but the gist is basically the same. ...


59

Let's put it this way: if you came by a store that sold your favorite candy for 10% less than other stores, would you think that buying there is somehow "unethical"? It's capitalism, right? You pick the best seller. That's not unethical, that's how the system works. If you want to look at the bright side: maybe they hired you over the other candidate, ...


54

Seems fishy. It could be incompetence or it could be malicious. Most likely it is an incompetent attempt at being malicious. You've got three choices: Politely ask for more details but make it clear that you will not cancel your job search until you have a clear and complete job offer. Cut ties with the recruiter. Send an email saying that you are no ...


51

I worked previously as a recruiter including with a couple of staffing agencies. Yes, it is common practice for agency recruiters to request that you withdraw from any other positions, including to ask to be BCC'd on messages to those other opportunities/recruiters/hiring managers. They are trying to do everything they can to land the deal, which includes ...


35

It's not unethical. They proposed an offer and you accepted it. That's the way it works. The fact that they would have paid you more if you had negotiated for more is immaterial.


32

This is really, really weird. Asking you to withdrawn from other companies is already a big red flag, but this mystery offer is even worst. You should demand to see the offer, as you have to consider a lot of things before accepting a job. Even so, you should really focus on getting into another job.


24

You asked three questions, Is my employer discriminating against non-parents? If so, is this discrimination allowed by UK employment law? Employment law in the UK currently classifies parental leave as a protected right. That is, the law protects the right of parents to take leave. This seems to inherently imply that such leave is not considered ...


19

Unethical or not doesn’t really matter, what matters is what you can do about it. If you think you should get a higher salary, then look for a different job. Preferably one that offers more. If you find one, sign a contract, give notice, and say goodbye. That’s the problem for companies lowballing you: They get you cheap, but they don’t keep you. If you’...


18

I'd tell them: "That's OK, assuming that it's indeed sometimes and not most of the time, and that the company is also OK with me sometimes having to come late or leave early, on both sides within reasonable limits". These are the points I'm trying to illustrate: Any company can sometimes find itself in a situation where some overtime is needed; but if that ...


16

It's not practical to ask for a company car for a week. The distance could, depending on travel time, be considered beyond what might be expected as reasonable. For example, a 40-mile drive from say St Albans to Reading, that's a lot of heavy traffic and very busy roads and would easily take 90 minutes or more each way, more if there was a problem en route....


15

Employers rarely start out offering the most they're willing to pay. They go in with the expectation that the candidate will try to negotiate a better deal. The note you saw was probably what they expected they would end up paying or possibly the maximum they could offer without having to request approval for a larger amount. Fair or unfair, it's the way ...


14

Talk to a lawyer Your recruiter isn't paid to know the law, they are paid to sign you up to companies. I've personally seen some very shady behaviour from some recruiters in the past, and without knowing this one, I wouldn't rule out that they may be lying to you. With that said, in some jurisdictions, it is true that non-compete clauses are either ...


13

First by way of reassurance, it is probably worth mentioning that it won't be your colleagues who decide who if anybody is let go from your organization. It will be your boss, who hopefully has a much better idea of your value to the organization. However this does indicate a slight problem with communication which you might do well to address. First I ...


10

One point I don't see here is you don't mention your own skill level. Very frequently jobs are "XX-YY range based on experience" maybe in your case the range was 30-50k and the default was 40k and you're on the lower end of the experience expectations. In my current position the advertisement was 30-35k. When they finally came to it they put it smack down in ...


9

Are you being discriminated against? Absolutely. Discriminate simply means favoring something for some reason. It generally does have an aspect of lacking fairness, but does not equate to illegal. There’s no way to be totally fair to everyone. And parental rights are such a mixed bag. Some people never have kids while others do. Some who never planned ...


9

my work in flexible I.e. if I start at 7, can finish at 4. Given that your work is flexible (and thus your manager is ok with that) some options you can propose I can think of are: Ask to go pick your child and then come back to work, leaving some time later so you can do your daily hours. See if you can work remotely after you pick up your son. You can ...


8

You may have been "cheated on" in the sense that the hiring manager was a better negotiator than you were, and they managed to get you to accept a lower salary than the one they were ready to offer. It's also possible that your skills were assessed during the interview and you were found less qualified than someone they expected to hire for this default ...


7

An employer can do anything which isn't forbade by law or contractual agreement. In your situation, you are about to be made redundant for reasons which you haven't given. This makes the request for references all the more strange as the primary reason one asks for references is to determine if a potential candidate is trustworthy or qualified. The other ...


6

If you wish to continue working with this shady recruiter then your next response should be something like: Hi Recruiter, Withdrawing my applications from elsewhere is not something I am comfortable doing unless I have signed an official offer letter from your client. I assure you that if I choose to sign your client's offer letter then I am not ...


6

Don't follow up, ask informally. Your manager stated that a policy is in place that prevent this: ask HR (replace HR with the relevant internal body in charge of these policies if different) without naming any name if there is a policy dealing with work abroad, since you know that connections are monitored. Better if you can ask to someone directly (John or ...


6

Putting my cynic's hat on for a moment, I wonder if this is an attempt to find something from your past to show you did something like lied on a resume, which would mean they could terminate you without any compensation. Before giving references I would ask what the purpose of the references is. It's a reasonable question - if they just want to verify ...


6

Question: How many hour a week do you work (either paid or unpaid)? 40 hours a week should be maintainable. Anything above that you need to cut it down. Since you are thinking about changing jobs or just having a break, which means your boss loses you 100%, you can go to your boss and say "the working hours that I do are too much. I'll cut it down to 40 ...


6

You forgot to mention your country, so I assume it is the U.K. Your company should reimburse your travelling cost which is 45p per mile driven, tax free.


5

In your case: If they are threatening you with lawyers then you need proper legal advice. As suggested in the comments you can get free legal advice from the Citizens Advice Bureau. In most cases: If you have been overpaid then you are obliged to repay the employer (within your ability to do so). However, it is entirely reasonable to ask for a complete ...


5

If you're changing from hourly to salaried then as you suspected you should be given a new contract that stipulates the new terms of your employment - including what your "basic" working hours are. This figure is then used to work out your effective hourly rate for minimum wage purposes (see here for details and examples). This rate must be at least the ...


5

Consider doubling down If you get the question are you pursuing other positions? This should be translated as How do you present your position and what setting would you like negotiations to take place in? The answer should depend on your preferences: If you want to be flexible, show dedication, and allow for delays without losing credibility or ...


4

You do not seem to understand the difference between declining a shift when the manager is doing the scheduling, and dropping an accepted shift with two hours notice on a Sunday. Think of it from her point of view. On Friday, if you had declined the shift, the manager could have easily scheduled someone else. On Sunday, with two hours notice, it would be ...


3

The first thing is that regardless of the root cause -- underlying health issue, or stress-induced health problem -- something has to give. I'm going to ignore root causes and focus solely on how to regain control over your work load and associated stress. One of the first things you need to learn about "work" is that if you don't tell your boss you're ...


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