125

Is that too much to ask? Not at all, rather they should be providing you with the written offer, before you ask. DO NOT, I repeat, do not resign until you have a signed and sealed contract / offer in your hands. There can be many reasons why your former boss cannot show you the contract before you resign - and none of the reasons are reasonable. This is ...


47

he wants me to resign before seeing the contract That is a major red flag. It is absolutely professional to see contract before signing it, and I am not sure why your current employment would be a problem. If contract has NDA, this is independent issue. In general advice goes as following: You don't have a job until contract is signed. If you resign your ...


33

I would first suggest having a look at a similar problem, of a non-speaker going somewhere, possibly northern Europe. You are not the only person who has this problem, so don't get discouraged! I am not a Chinese individual. So my answer can only come from my western perspective, so bear that in mind, when reading my answer. To answer your questions ...


20

I understand that as SysAdmin I will occasionally have to work overtime, possibly at short notice, but this amount is clearly unsustainable for my health, and strikes me as unreasonable. Why do you think that it's unreasonable? Are the failures non-critical? Can the company carry on until tomorrow without them, and without suffering any substantial ...


19

When it comes to the shares be very wary of attaching much value to them (and much less to a mere promise of them). Here are some things to be aware of: You can't know anything about their value without knowing how many shares there are in total (and potentially who owns them), what rights attach to those shares and what limitations are put on you. For ...


17

I want to apply for garden leave so I can look for a role. Am I allowed to do this and what's the likelihood it will get granted? You certainly can ask, but don't keep your hopes up. It gives you the upside of 3 months paid leave, and downside to the company of having to pay you, but also not getting anything out of you. Hardly a fair deal. Now if you ...


17

Firstly, you're doing great. You've only been in the UK for 2.5 years and your writing is indistinguishable from a native. You can understand most things that are said on TV. You're already at a very advanced level. Despite your concerns, you've got and are holding a job in a completely native speaking environment, so you must be doing OK, and probably a ...


16

Like many native speakers of English I have very limited foreign language skills. To me, what you are attempting, understanding colloquial speech in a foreign language at full native speaker speed, seems like an incredible intellectual achievement. There should be no embarrassment at all in not being quite there yet. You will learn most from immersion in ...


10

While my supervisor is very patient, I am also worried that he regrets hiring me. Don't worry too much about that. Supposedly, your supervisor hired you after an interview, so he knew your level of English at the moment of hire. And now that you're in an office full of Brits, he's probably assuming that you'll improve in six months to a year from now. ...


10

Handling these types of emergencies, and working late to get them sorted out, is normal for members of ops teams. For me, it took a while to adjust to this style of working. But, believe me, you can adjust if you give it some time. If you get loopy when you're hungry, keep an emergency stash of energy bars in your work place. They help a lot. Just keep in ...


10

The problem I got is he wants me to resign before seeing the contract, No, first comes the term sheet. EDIT: Then, the ShareHolding Agreement. I'll admit, I didn't realize this one was so important until I read Alex Hayward's excellent answer. Then comes the contract, along with a vesting schedule. And then, and only then, comes the resignation. And ...


9

It's somewhat normal to need this sort of documentation to perform background checks, credit checks, or other steps required for new employees in some industries. Of course, you want to be sure you are talking to a legitimate employer, not a scammer pretending to be hiring new employees. This should be pretty obvious if you've performed interviews with a ...


8

As long as it's a name your previous employers and/or google/linkedin will correctly link to you for verification/background checks, you can use whatever you like.


6

Sounds like they are just doing a FCA check on you (specifically they need some of that stuff for credit) which is pretty common in the UK for financial jobs (regulation). Most of the material is required for any standard UK job (financial or not) - I have been asked for my passport for proof of right to work in the UK for every job I've had. Here is a ...


5

Other answers address whether or not you should send them, however if you do decide to send these, and send via email, then I would strongly consider sending via password protected PDF, or better yet put them onto an online storage account such as DropBox or OneDrive, as this way you can ensure the information is only directly accessibly by the correct party....


5

From my point of view it's okay to do that. I know a friend in UK who doesn't like to put his legal name in his CV, or LinkedIn profile either. At the end of the day, CV is a tools to get you into the interview and not issue you with an official offer. Before a company issue you an official offer, they require you to provide them things like Social Security ...


5

(Not specifically UK applicable) In general, people who have a "native" name and also a "local" name, which is particularly common in cultures where the native name may be hard to pronounce (specifically, east and southeast Asia), usually use their native name on their CV, and then parenthesize their local name. For example, if your name is Jinping Xi (...


4

No such thing as "Legal name" in the UK (more specifically England and Wales, Scotland is different). You are free to change what name you go by with very few restrictions. The only thing you cannot really do is hide any of your names if they matter, that's why on all sorts of credit applications you are asked if there are any other names you are known by. ...


4

I'm from the US, but I spent many years in the Netherlands. I learned Dutch and spent time in a predominantly Dutch-speaking environment. I also once had a roommate from Hasselt that had a regional accent so strong I sometimes had a hard time understanding him even in one-on-one conversations. I can relate to a reasonable degree to your story. You're ...


4

It's professional and reasonable to tell a company that you are interviewing with that you have already received an offer from someone else and are considering it. if they say, "Oh, well nevermind," then they weren't all that interested in you, and that's fine. But there's a decent chance that they'll say, "Huh... well, that company usually knows their stuff....


4

For how long could I delay signing an offered job contract and how to best justify it? As long as you are comfortable with it. Normally all employers know that the potential employees apply for multiple positions at once. So, no need to clarify this. If asked, you can say you are waiting for feedback from another companies. It's normal. But here I have to ...


4

You can ask but it is very unlikely. The company gains nothing from having you not come to work, and they still have to pay you. Garden leave is for situations where there is an advantage to you not coming in - perhaps because your role has the potential to damage the company, or your replacement wants a clean break, or you've done something so embarrassing ...


3

At the end of the day a contract is just a signed piece of paper in which the parties agree to something that can be legally enforced at a later date (technically it doesn't even have to be on paper but that is preferable). There is nothing stopping you simply printing out (preferably on letterhead paper if such exists) As of [date], [your name]'s salary is ...


3

A great way to improve your "ear" for English is to listen to podcasts -- often they are more colloquial and casual, like colleagues or customers are. TV is more scripted and the numbers/types of people cast are more limited, but any couple people with a microphone anywhere in the country can set up a podcast. You probably want one where the description ...


3

You have received already quite some answers about how to improve your English, but, as someone in your exact same position, I'm sure that your main immediate problem is not really "how to get better", but how to survive with your current level of English. When I moved to the UK I was mostly able to understand spoken English but I had some issues with ...


2

In addition to the other good answers, I would say that you should talk to your CTO about how this is bad for the company. You are, as you say, a single point of failure. If you decide to leave then the company will have nobody with the expertise to maintain the systems. The CTO should see this as an unacceptable level of risk (and you merely mentioning the ...


2

So my question is, how best do I handle this? Make a list of the things that you think are unreasonable. Come up with potential solutions to those issues. Present them to your boss. If your boss doesn't acknowledge and address them and doesn't attempt to at least find some middle ground then find a job elsewhere. Your boss may not be willing to do anything ...


2

First: I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. Also, I assume for the purposes of this answer that the company is both a controller and a processor of personal data. (for Definitions see Art. 4 GDPR) Does it need to be reported? In case of a personal data breach, Art. 33 (1) GDPR says the controller needs to: [...] without undue delay and, where ...


2

I immediately contacted the founder (who handles pay) and told him the mistake and he turns around and says "Oh I thought that was what we agreed! You should have done so in writing over email (or over Slack maybe). But no worries, you can still memorialize the conversation retroactively. This message is to memorialize our conversation from two ...


1

I had a friend whose surname would have suggested he was from an ethnic minority. There was no obvious indication of this if you'd met him, he had no accent nor physical characteristics. He was disappointed by responses to job applications, mostly getting immediate rejections. He switched to using his mother's maiden name, which was a traditional English ...


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