56

I am on the autism spectrum (aspergers syndrome) and I can relate. I was almost unemployable for a while. Here's what I did, maybe it can help you. The best way to help yourself is to create new scripts for yourself. I highly recommend the following books How to win friends and influence people, by Dale Carnegie The Hard Truth About Soft Skills: ...


24

Notice period is calculated in calendar days (not working days) so the weekend is included, the notice period begins the day after you give notice (not the same day) so if you gave notice on the 15th of then the first day of your notice period is actually the 16th making the last day of your notice period the 15th of December i.e. your last day of employment ...


22

They can ask but you have every right to tell them to shove it. This isn't normal in any shape or form, the sorts of questions you are talking about do get looked into to one degree or another when you're going through some of the more rigorous security clearances and while I've had third parties require clearances to work with them before you don't provide ...


20

The situation in the UK with regard to deductions for mistakes is somewhat complicated. Here is a page that discusses the legalities of it and another page by ACAS. What is certain is three things: They cannot reduce your wages below minimum wages for any reason They cannot deduct more than 10% of your wages for mistakes (though they can deduct 10% ...


12

Personally, I consider the "Bradford Factor" something that HR people use when they flunked basic math in grammar school. It does not give you anything but a meaningless number that you can use to look up consequences if doing your actual job as HR on a case-by-case basis somehow is too challenging and you'd rather follow a script. The Bradford Factor is ...


11

Have you tried turning this into a game? Changing your habits is difficult and is likely to require a significant amount of concentration. Turning the challenge into a game can be an effective way to improve concentration. You should consult your manager or a friend before attempting the following: In your shoes I'd be inclined to seek the help of my ...


11

Here is how recruiters work: they usually get payed large sums of money by the employer once a candidate they referred gets a contract (usually tied to the entry-salary). They do not work for you, they work for the prospective employers. You are their raw-material, so to speak. So they like to build up a database of candidates to quickly refer a suitable ...


9

Bradford Score: https://www.kashflow.com/blog/bradford-factor-calculator/ Your current situation is one of the disadvantages of using Bradford Score. IMHO, if you like your current company, and your medical condition is not affecting your performance when you at work, you should send a letter to HR / Direct Manager, explaining your absence and stating that ...


9

If the goal here is to get rehired - do nothing. You would be wasting your time. You weren't employed there long enough and weren't dismissed for an "automatically unfair" reason so you cannot challenge the dismissal. It sucks, I get that - but there's simply no legal basis to challenge this on and you've already been through their internal processes (twice)...


9

Realistically, no, it's not a legal issue. Promoting someone that the manager likes over someone that is somehow objectively more qualified is perfectly legal unless some protected characteristic is involved. It is generally poor business practice to promote unqualified candidates and it can demotivate other employees but it isn't illegal. There may be ...


8

The thing that strikes the most in your post is: and eventually, I will, in a few weeks, make another remark This suggest that you have an issue with learning acceptable professional interpersonal behavior. The fact that this has been going on for years means that this issue is engrained and need long time to fix. On professional level, you should learn ...


8

how can I know if a recruiter has a job I'm interested in before I tell them my whole story? Ask them. Make it the first thing you do in the conversation. If they open with a bunch of questions about you, then simply ask them "First, can you tell me about the position you're calling about please?" (or a similar question in a polite, professional and ...


7

If you needed some government security clearance, then an awful lot of question would be asked, your family and maybe your friends would be asked, but your employer would not hear anything about anything you say, except at the end whether you got clearance or not. So your employer asking for that kind of information is a very, very dark crimson red flag. ...


7

These references aren't standard, run of the mill references that employers request every time you move between jobs. These are specifically in relation for security vetting, and the entire purpose will to see whether or not you are suitable to be given access to Security Cleared documentation and work on particular projects. I would suggest this is likely ...


6

You’re coming in from a technical background where facts rule, and the rules on how to tell a computer what to do is well defined (eg programming language), and if you didn’t handle something appropriately, the computer will tell you what you did wrong (eg error messages, exceptions, unexpected results). That’s a pretty well defined rule set and it’s pretty ...


6

Ethically wrong, certainly, legally, it depends on your jurisdiction. If they're not going to take into account your medical reasons, then it's time to move on. The reason being that they just demonstrated to you that they care about the numbers and ONLY the numbers. There is an old saying, "The map is not the territory". Things like the Bradford factor ...


6

The Bradford factor is just a way to quickly gauge for potential issues. Realistically if someone looked at the case and you had a valid medical reason for the absence they shouldn't give you a warning - but that's just it, it's really something that depends on if someone just saw the score and gave a warning because they blindly follow the score.. or if ...


5

Am I acting within my rights? Partially, I believe you're using company resources (email) to organise a meeting outside of the company to discuss company issues crosses a line. That's not to say you're not free to meet with whom ever you please outside of work for whatever purpose but if you organised it from company email (to or from) then IMHO that's not ...


5

all employees complete a security related interview involving personal questions such as if we have any issues in our marriage, if we have any problems with car/house loans etc., If we have problems with alcohol or drugs outside of work and other personal questions. These questions generally fall into security clearance type questions for government jobs. ...


5

It doesn't matter what the original advert said. That's only an opening point in negotiations. You successfully negotiated away that repayment clause, as proven by the signed contract. The new company presumably buys your current company as a whole, including all assets and contracts. That would include your employment contract, as signed. It is almost ...


4

You are saying it was not in any contract you signed. I job advert is not part of the contract. Even if it was in the job advert, any court would just laugh at the company making that claim. So you keep hold tightly of the original appointment letter, you inform them as politely as you can that a job advert is never part of an employment contract, and ...


4

Seems like you are mentally checked out from the company and moved on, which is even more reasons to have that discussion with your current boss. Explain that you just want to move on, asap, and ask how this can be facilitated. Usually, that means compiling a list of things that need to be delivered, and after that, the company can just let you go. In the ...


4

Just as a general point: Your current employer can ask your former employer whatever they like. Whether your former employer can legally answer in any kind of detail is another matter. Whether they would answer in that kind of detail is another still. Most employers, in order to avoid the potential for lawsuits, won't confirm anything beyond job titles ...


3

That word sensitive is evocative. This sort of question is exactly what FBI or OPM agents are checking into when doing a security clearance investigation for a potential US government employee. Although everyone agrees this sort of questioning is uncomfortable, I certainly wouldn’t take it personally. Your employer — which may well be a government agency or ...


3

I know a few people who are owner-operators of consultancy businesses who give themselves a job title that describes their day-to-day job. Two on my network are 'Senior Project Manager' and 'Human Resources Consultant"


3

Don't put it on your resume A resume is a marketing document. You wouldn't put in a sales brochure that the prior owner of a house left after only a month. Something should only go on the resume if it makes you look good. Just leave it off. It will seem like you were unemployed for two months (assuming your prior job search took a month). Should I ...


3

You won't need travel insurance, nor a visa, to work in the UK currently. We're still in the EU which means you'll be covered by the NHS as standard. Nobody knows what will happen when we leave, not even the people pushing Brexit through the pipeline currently. Social insurance: As I keep my residence in Germany and stay here > 180 days this should not ...


2

You don't mention if this is on the job training, or a professional qualification / training that the company is providing to perform your role. I'll assume it's a professional set of training they are offering. In my experience it is common for a company to include a form of reimbursement clause when they offer expensive training, the reason for this is ...


2

I'll put to one side the issue as to whether this is an appropriate way for a company to raise this issue. There are a number of ways. In my experience this is quite common however only in the instance of the company forking out for paid training. i.e. I don't believe it's reasonable that they can arbitrarily set a figure of £13k for "on the job training" ...


2

When I started my one-man consultancy, I used Managing Director (the accurate legal title in the country in question) when doing business as myself. However, when acting as a hired gun for my previous employer and dealing with their clients, I continued to use the same title I used to have when employed there. The fun thing with small companies, though, is ...


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