84

Toughen up a bit. At this level, it's been one comment, poking fun at something you posted. It's obnoxious, but it's certainly not HR-level, and the fact that you think it is suggests that your sensitivity meter is dialed up too high by at least a few notches. You can offer cogent argument in the comments about how what you're suggesting is not the same ...


68

It's perfectly fine for you to prefer to keep work and family separated. I think it's also fine for your employer to ask you if you were willing to have your family and friends test the service (but not to force you). You've politely declined, so I don't think there's much more you have to tell them. This, in theory, shouldn't hold you back. What if your ...


66

This is really very very specific and different for each and every case. I have worked at offices where the canteen not only offered free to use cutlery but also free to use sides (salads, pickles, table salt, sauce, dips etc). I have also worked at places where in the food court, even occupying a table without ordering food was not allowed. It really ...


60

I think you are misreading the social cues here. From the now-deleted screenshot of the chat, the sequence of postings is: You make a posting asking for better quality toilet paper. Someone (M) makes a straightforward reply that you need to go to facilities, who handle this. You then post asking if a bidet spray is an option. Another person (A) posts that ...


52

Although I congratulate you on your achievement, IMO it's not appropriate. The same would apply to winning the lottery, receiving an inheritance, hitting a jackpot in the casino, getting a big chunk of tax-returns or buying a house on the Cayman Islands. Financials should be kept private and shouldn't be rubbed under the noses of coworkers. The reasons for ...


45

If you're working more than 48 hours per week in the UK, and haven't signed to explicitly say you're happy to do so, then that's (in most situations) illegal. You could choose to get HR involved on that front alone, or you could get them involved on bullying (getting yelled at in nearly any situation counts, especially being yelled at frequently for not ...


32

My guess fo what exactly happened: the canteen company complained that they don't get paid to do your dishes and the manager they complained at did not have enough spine to tell them that that is their problem. Either that or your bank signed a contract that did not include this and was just pointed at this clause. Is this normal? Office politics and ...


27

I seriously doubt that AR is going to mock you for asking about better toilet paper. What he will mock you for is acting as if a juvenile joke about toilet paper is a personal attack against you. If you take this mishmash to HR they are most likely to tell you that just because you have a sensitive asshole it is no reason for you to be a sensitive asshole. ...


27

So my question is, is this normal? Perfectly normal, it's a business decision to cut losses or to boost sales. I had always presumed an implicit difference in the relationship between staff and a canteen and customers and a restaurant. Am I off the mark here or not? As long as it's an independent company with a different management they tend to look ...


22

Yes this is normal. It always goes back to the contract. The vendor has the right to protect their money. If the cutlery is being washed they have a right to limit non-customers from adding to their items being washed. If the cutlery is being thrown out after a single use, they have right to limit non-customers from taking their stock. Unless the contact ...


22

I'm going to offer an alternative way of framing your negative It's unlikely it'd bring any value to their lives This statement tells me that your family might not be the target market for the service. I don't have the full context of your service and your family to make it into a nicer, more concrete example, but when asked again, I'd list a few ...


20

One issue they may be trying to address is loss. If people habitually remove cutlery from the canteen, some is likely to find its way home in lunchboxes, get thrown out when clearing up, fall down the back of people's desks or the break room sofa, or get stashed in a drawer "for next time". It wouldn't surprise me if the restriction was at least in ...


12

I've only experienced this once in a workplace, and it was from someone of a more typical age to pay off a mortgage (about 55 as I recall), but it struck all of us as somewhat unusual. [Edited to add: our culture was also that there are "cakes in the usual place" for birthdays etc. I have been in the workplace about 20 years.] In your situation -- being ...


9

my work in flexible I.e. if I start at 7, can finish at 4. Given that your work is flexible (and thus your manager is ok with that) some options you can propose I can think of are: Ask to go pick your child and then come back to work, leaving some time later so you can do your daily hours. See if you can work remotely after you pick up your son. You can ...


9

Is the total extent of AR's mockery this one post? If so, I really think you need to calm down. What do you expect HR to do? Do you think they're going to fire him because he made one snide remark about toilet paper? Or even give him some sort of formal reprimand? In a normal, healthy workplace, people joke around with each other all the time. Trying to ...


9

It's certainly possible that you are reading the situation correctly, your colleague is intentionally being highly offensive to you, and you need to stand up for yourself. Based on your question history, though, I would tend to suspect that it's a cultural miscommunication or the result of some other source of stress. Yesterday, you thought you were being ...


9

I've done a bit of reading about UK employment law, and I have some good news. From https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/1833/regulation/6/made (1) A night worker’s normal hours of work in any reference period which is applicable in his case shall not exceed an average of eight hours for each 24 hours. (2) An employer shall take all reasonable ...


7

Your company can do a lot of things legally you don’t like. But this isn’t your company doing it, it’s your deputy manager. So step one is that you tell your deputy manager you are not coming. You never worked on that day, and you are not starting it. If there’s a problem it’s because the deputy manager gave four people the day off, for his own selfish ...


7

First off: Is there a particular reason you don't want to be friends with your colleagues? Some of my best friends now are ex colleagues because we became such good friends on work socials. I'd recommend looking outside your department for people you don't really work with day-to-day. Maybe offer to be social sec? To answer your question though: Yes be ...


7

They can ask but you don't have to answer - as your absence was less than 7 calendar days simply stating that you were not well enough to work is sufficient. To quote acas: If a worker is absent due to sickness for seven days or less they can self-certify their absence. This means the worker informs their employer that they are not well enough to work ...


6

Is the primary purpose of the restaurant to make money for its operator or is it to make meals efficient and pleasant for the bank employees? Your employer has to make a choice and then has to act on that choice. One reason that I would immediately change this policy is that it isolates employees who have special meal or health requirements. During meals, ...


6

If your contract don't state place (or method) of where work should be performed then adding such requirment would require appendix to your contract. And that leave you open for negotiation. Requiring you to commute to workplace means your income will be lower. You agreed on X pay based on the fact that you will work from home. Commute will change that pay ...


6

This sounds like an awful situation. I've been in similar. It's nasty. You are wise to ask for help, starting here. You could leave this job and get another. That's obvious, and it's easy to say. But you probably can't afford a period of unemployment, and you may even have an immigration problem if you have no job. And, you are in no condition to look ...


5

It depends what you mean, if this is a redeployment into an "alternative suitable role" then yes, it's normal and your legal right to have a trial period (this also works for the business to make sure you're actually suitable for the role) which is 4 weeks, it can be extended if necessary such as further training needed. Let's assume, for the rest of this, ...


5

A Return to Work procedure is standard and common place, but listing the provided medications is odd - but not illegal or unethical. If you're on medication that can possibly affect your performance, such as pain killers, you can use this form to pre-emptively cover yourself by informing your HR department. BUT This information falls under the Data ...


5

This really needs a country tag! But anyway, here is another angle you could take: You can offer to leave voluntarily. In many countries and Legislation this makes it A LOT easier for your employer and can be a good bargaining chip. Then you offer to keep going as a freelancer for the type of work that shows up occasionally and that would be a "waste of ...


5

It is unlikely to hold you back (in western countries). Companies commonly trial new services or products with so called "friendly users" - quite often employees or families of employees. People who, if something is wrong (which is likely during early trials) won't immediately complain on social media or the press, but talk to - in this case - you about it ...


4

how do I react to it Ultimately, that's a question that needs a personal answer based on your own goals and your feelings. No one likes to be mocked, especially when making a helpful suggestion about a sensitive topic. But it's important to also keep in mind that those who mock are often just looking for attention - they want to get a rise out of you, and ...


4

Ask a lawyer. (if in the UK you could go to the Citizens Advice Bureaux) My gut instinct is that they can put you on probation but would get into hot water if they used it as a workaround for redundancy pay and protections. I don't really know though. Could be a non-issue or could be a huge deal for you. This seems like the kind of issue where you need an ...


4

Would it be considered as rude to ask for such schedule to our stakeholders? I do not think it would be considered as rude. It seems reasonable to know the schedule for your day. As long as you ask it nicely instead of demanding it or pushing for it, there is nothing wrong in asking.


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