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95

It's perfectly fine for you to prefer to keep work and family separated. I think it's also fine for your employer to ask you if you were willing to have your family and friends test the service (but not to force you). You've politely declined, so I don't think there's much more you have to tell them. This, in theory, shouldn't hold you back. What if your ...


88

Although I congratulate you on your achievement, IMO it's not appropriate. The same would apply to winning the lottery, receiving an inheritance, hitting a jackpot in the casino, getting a big chunk of tax-returns or buying a house on the Cayman Islands. Financials should be kept private and shouldn't be rubbed under the noses of coworkers. The reasons for ...


27

I'm going to offer an alternative way of framing your negative It's unlikely it'd bring any value to their lives This statement tells me that your family might not be the target market for the service. I don't have the full context of your service and your family to make it into a nicer, more concrete example, but when asked again, I'd list a few ...


26

I've only experienced this once in a workplace, and it was from someone of a more typical age to pay off a mortgage (about 55 as I recall), but it struck all of us as somewhat unusual. [Edited to add: our culture was also that there are "cakes in the usual place" for birthdays etc. I have been in the workplace (various companies) about 20 years.] In your ...


9

It is unlikely to hold you back (in western countries). Companies commonly trial new services or products with so called "friendly users" - quite often employees or families of employees. People who, if something is wrong (which is likely during early trials) won't immediately complain on social media or the press, but talk to - in this case - you about it ...


4

That your company keeps asking this despite you saying no repeatedly suggests that they are desperately looking for beta users for the product. I'd suggest saying no again, and explaining why on that basis. Look, the truth is my family members would have no value, maybe negative value, as beta users. They're not our customers - Even if I get them to sign ...


3

To avoid conflict, you can tell your family said no. This does not even need to be a white lie, you can ask your family (and explain the advantages and disadvantages and tell them that they should not say yes to do you a favour) and probably will get a no.


3

Just be honest with yourself and company and this shall come to good. In fact, you shall discuss with your company the reasons behind your decision to move to another city and they would try some middle way if possible. After taking training or buyout of the contract, it will be a difficult situation for both parties to break up.


3

No means no. If they asked you once to involve your family in their company, that was pushing a boundary pretty hard. If they repeatedly won't take "no" for an answer to an unreasonable request, that's preposterous. These people are unprofessional weirdos. If they're this desperate to find anybody to try their service, they're almost certainly doomed in ...


2

Is this likely to hold me back? We don't know your company culture or your senior members, so it's pretty hard for us to say if it's likely to hold you back. We don't even know what your product is. It is likely that they cannot legally do anything. It is also possible that this may affect how invested you appear to be in the company. This can have various ...


2

No, they are not allowed to by law as stated in the official gov-docs since they are an UK-based company and the recruitment is done from there (as you stated in your question), so local laws do apply, regardless of the nationality of the applicant/candidate: Discrimination during recruitment/Discrimination in job adverts You must not state or imply ...


1

It is illegal in the U.K. The reason why it is illegal in the U.K. is because it is unethical and undermining the values of the British society. If your manager in the U.K. trumpets out that he wants to do things outside the U.K. that are illegal in the U.K., unethical, and against British core values, even jokingly, then the company should consider ...


1

This answer is assuming you will definitely be moving to City 2 regardless of what happens with your employer, the client, etc. If it would be a practical and appropriate option for you to work for the client at their 'City 2' location (e.g. their office in City 2 would be a suitable place to carry out whatever your job function is)... Given the ...


1

It depends on the environment you have at work. If your coworkers are just casual acquaintances you happen to see on a daily basis, then I'd say no, for reasons others have stated (bragging, etc). However, if your coworkers are more like friends, where you share personal stories, things about your lives, hang out outside of work, and so on, then I see no ...


1

Why not? I see colleagues celebrating happy things in their life with their coworkers all the time. Marriages, children, birthdays … You don’t have to mention how much money the mortgage was. You can simply say that you’ve finally payed back your mortgage and because you feel happy and relieved about being debt free you want to celebrate with a cake. I’m ...


1

Let's say you're working for Facebook or similar social media before they were popular. But you can't be bothered with promoting the very service you're working on? Either: you really don't care about the service, which is bad enough; or maybe the service is so bad that it's going to be a disaster, that's even worse. I'd say the first case is more ...


1

If you worry about the situation, let's try to resolve it another way. What if you start supervising a volunteers group via social media or any equivalent? If the company product is really a thing, there could be bunch of people who happily be a one of early adopters, a part of a focus group etc. Give it a try, why not?


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