379

So my question is, is it normal for recruitment agents to send out job offers without any details? In my experience, that is not at all normal. I've never encountered it personally, nor have I ever heard of it before. As a hiring manager, I never required anything like it from applicants. If not, what details should I expect in a proper job offer? I ...


300

Stop what you're doing and think things through. You're developing APIs that interact with a live finance system. If things go wrong and you write instead of read or do something to corrupt the system, you could wreck people's lives (and the company for that matter). Don't do that. Create or request a separate test system to interface with and use that ...


285

Could be harmless, could be bad. It's clearly significant: Written invitation and HR presence means it's something official where HR makes sure that all laws and procedures are followed. Most likely a formal change to your work arrangements. How to prepare: Keep your eyes and ears open. Are there any financial troubles, reorganizations, layoffs, ...


227

For the purposes of this, I'm going to assume that at least the bare facts of the reviews are accurate (i.e., that the company uses older technologies and sometimes requires legacy code from new hires). That being the case, I'd actually lean towards "Ignore it", perhaps even with a mixture of "Embrace it". The whole point of Glassdoor reviews is so you can ...


207

You're looking at this "problem" the wrong way. The way your question reads is "People are leaving negative reviews, therefore people shouldn't be leaving negative reviews, how do we stop people from leaving negative reviews, or have the negative reviews removed to keep our reputation?". That's the mindset that makes you deserving of those negative reviews....


196

You launched a formal complaint complete with witnesses and documentation which was investigated for 10 weeks while you were paid for doing nothing, and then your complaints were found to be groundless, even your witnesses did not back you up. Is this co-worker relationship salvageable? No. You put multiple people into a difficult position. Things will ...


195

First, as a tip, try to mute your microphone unless you have to speak. That way you will minimize the noise the others in the meeting perceive. Now, given you are this baby's mother and it's perfectly natural to care for them and feed them, I don't think you have to ask for permission, nor do I think it's possible (or even legal) for them to forbid you to ...


179

Don't do it! No, it's not normal. Seeing how likely an offer is to fall through (better candidate found, bad fit, etc.) you should never put all your eggs in one basket, even if you actually had been given a full job description. Best case, the job is real and something that interests you and something you're qualified for and you actually get an offer. ...


147

A former co-worker, not a recruiter but someone who deals with a ton of email, once told me that she only scans emails for the important information because that's what they're told to do. Many recruiters are likely doing the same thing: scanning your email for a phone number and then emailing you when they can't find it rather than carefully reading it and ...


144

It's challenging to speculate about why particular decisions are made, even if you're able to observe directly - so, as a potential frame-challenge to your question, it's worth considering that you may not be correctly attributing a given decision to the right factors. But generally, there are lots of reasons why management might make these decisions: ...


143

It is not "unethical". It is just business. They're in the business of making money. Simple as that. They'll pay their suppliers as little as possible, they'll pay their staff as little as possible. They'll charge their customers as much as possible. The definition of "as possible" varies from company to company but the gist is basically the same. ...


137

I'm developer in your shoes and I had the added challenge of not having done any kind of computing type work before my current job as a Technical Lead at my company. With age comes experience, so often as an "older", I use this term very loosely, developer you bring different skills and competencies to the table. A couple things to note: Leverage your work ...


121

was I wrong in copying in the other directors in the email? Yes, you were wrong. It's not clear what your goal was in copying others, but attempting to embarrass or undermine your boss is not a good career move. Maybe I should have sent it directly to him first. Not maybe. You clearly should have sent it to him directly. Even better would have been ...


120

By the sounds of it, John is just under-educated on your condition and genuinely is just trying to have a joke on with you. Personally I wouldn't try and look for new jobs but try talking to John. Pull him over for a chat again and say Hey John, I don't know if you know but I have psoriasis which causes the look of dry skin. I don't mind when we joke ...


118

Today in a call a recruiter mentioned that I might want to consider finding something fast because having this few months out of employment "raises some questions" No it does not. A "gap" only raises questions if it's a gap. If you worked from 2011-2016 and 2018-2019 and refuse to tell me what you did in between, that is a gap. It probably means a prison ...


118

You are saying that you have nothing written down and agreed before moving job and all of this was done verbally. Speak to your manager again explaining that the offer you have received is not what you understood it was and you only accepted on the basis of the £50k you agreed. If this has no impact then there might be the avenue of escalating this through ...


117

I'd say highly unlikely. You wrote: she will just rot on the couch for the rest of her life if left to her own devices. That clearly shows she does not want to get a job. Job application says she wants to get a job. Thus, any application would be a lie on that single most important point. If you apply for her, you will be lying and wasting resources of ...


96

You seem to be thinking of this from a very cold perspective. That's probably a good way to get into the "mind" of a corporation, but since the decision-makers are actual people they may not respond quite that way. For example, your point on morale suggests that morale would be higher with larger and more intense layoffs than with smaller, less aggressive ...


93

It's perfectly fine for you to prefer to keep work and family separated. I think it's also fine for your employer to ask you if you were willing to have your family and friends test the service (but not to force you). You've politely declined, so I don't think there's much more you have to tell them. This, in theory, shouldn't hold you back. What if your ...


84

Is it ethically wrong to have peek at staff paycheck? Yes, and illegal in a lot of countries. Don't do this, and if you did hope no one will ever know or you risk your job and maybe more.


84

Provide the reason you are unable to field phone calls. It is not necessary to be specific - vague language like: "I have a condition which (temporarily/permanently) prevents me from using a phone" or "I do not have ready access to a phone/network connection suitable for voice communication" would be sufficient. It is not necessary to invite or ...


84

Toughen up a bit. At this level, it's been one comment, poking fun at something you posted. It's obnoxious, but it's certainly not HR-level, and the fact that you think it is suggests that your sensitivity meter is dialed up too high by at least a few notches. You can offer cogent argument in the comments about how what you're suggesting is not the same ...


84

Although I congratulate you on your achievement, IMO it's not appropriate. The same would apply to winning the lottery, receiving an inheritance, hitting a jackpot in the casino, getting a big chunk of tax-returns or buying a house on the Cayman Islands. Financials should be kept private and shouldn't be rubbed under the noses of coworkers. The reasons for ...


81

Given the limited information here, my conclusion is that you drew the short stick on an internal power play. Steve definitely set you up to fail as a senior dev. He promoted you to the position knowing you lack the hard skills necessary to do the job, he did not properly train you, and then he used your lack of skills to motivate his decision to not work ...


78

Firstly, check if your travel insurance covers business, or if it's just a tourist coverage. Secondly... I'd be a bit suspicious of any company that requires me to insure their own property (you can't buy insurance on an item that you don't have any financial interest in), or any company that can't self-insure something as cheap as a laptop (even a Macbook ...


74

"Maintenance and support of project x, including major refactoring yy modules to allow integration with zz. This allowed the company to progress with MI reporting solution / comprehensive unit test framework / some other usefulness, resulting in a reduced total cost of ownership, a saving of approx $4m." Repeat per project. Mostly fixing bugs Spin and ...


69

Is your company a union company? If so, check if you have a right to bring a union representative the same way that your boss has someone from HR. Most likely, you do. Because the one thing you want to avoid is being in a 2 vs. 1 situation that could turn into a "he said / she said" conflict. Announce this before, and treat it as a perfectly normal thing. ...


66

This is really very very specific and different for each and every case. I have worked at offices where the canteen not only offered free to use cutlery but also free to use sides (salads, pickles, table salt, sauce, dips etc). I have also worked at places where in the food court, even occupying a table without ordering food was not allowed. It really ...


64

"Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me." You learned a valuable lesson here: Your manager/boss cannot be trusted. Unless you signed anything already (contract, offer letter, etc.), if I was in your shoes, I would stop working immediately for this liar and would look for a job elsewhere. Of course, always follow the proper procedure, e.g. ...


63

If you have a medical condition that prevents you from using a phone, you should be upfront about the restriction. You don’t need to clarify what the specific condition is, but you should include the limitation clearly in your cover letters. You should also disclose the preference for email as early as possible in discussions with recruiters (e.g., in an ...


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