New answers tagged

2

Sounds like you’ve already did the most crucial step. Communicate that his joking about that specific thing is not okay. Since he insists on making you uncomfortable now that he is totally aware that it is, this is bullying and harassment and they are creating a hostile work environment. Its time for you to take it up to management and if management doesn’...


5

It depends what you mean, if this is a redeployment into an "alternative suitable role" then yes, it's normal and your legal right to have a trial period (this also works for the business to make sure you're actually suitable for the role) which is 4 weeks, it can be extended if necessary such as further training needed. Let's assume, for the rest of this, ...


4

Ask a lawyer. (if in the UK you could go to the Citizens Advice Bureaux) My gut instinct is that they can put you on probation but would get into hot water if they used it as a workaround for redundancy pay and protections. I don't really know though. Could be a non-issue or could be a huge deal for you. This seems like the kind of issue where you need an ...


1

Opinion: I think it is unlikely that they can compel you to work unusual hours at such short notice. Obviously they can't physically force you and if they try to fire you then I don't think a court would find they have done so with reasonable cause. I am not a lawyer. If you want to go down this route then you should get some kind of legal advice, ideally ...


9

I've done a bit of reading about UK employment law, and I have some good news. From https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/1998/1833/regulation/6/made (1) A night worker’s normal hours of work in any reference period which is applicable in his case shall not exceed an average of eight hours for each 24 hours. (2) An employer shall take all reasonable ...


7

Your company can do a lot of things legally you don’t like. But this isn’t your company doing it, it’s your deputy manager. So step one is that you tell your deputy manager you are not coming. You never worked on that day, and you are not starting it. If there’s a problem it’s because the deputy manager gave four people the day off, for his own selfish ...


3

As far as I know you don't have any legal rights in this situation. But you should be telling the deputy manager you already have plans for Saturday that you cannot reschedule, if that fails ask the manager if you must. Family dominated businesses it is usually best to give the family a bit of leeway if at all possible. Often in a two job situation you ...


9

It's certainly possible that you are reading the situation correctly, your colleague is intentionally being highly offensive to you, and you need to stand up for yourself. Based on your question history, though, I would tend to suspect that it's a cultural miscommunication or the result of some other source of stress. Yesterday, you thought you were being ...


3

The problem with someone else's face and expressions is that it is their face and expressions, and there is nothing you can or should do to change that. Some people have what is called "resting bitch face" but that doesn't mean that they are always angry, it just means their face is their face. Your co-worker appears to have what you interpret as as a ...


1

Human resources doesn’t care about individual, isolated incidents. First and foremost, I am honestly not too sure what you mean when you say this: I work in the I.T. department as I had an issue with cheap toilet roll and unable to sit because of pain so I decided to put in a request. But in general — and unless the incident is incredibly crazy or ...


-1

Lie. In the USA the employer can not release your salary. Tell them something realistic and they should top it.


60

I think you are misreading the social cues here. From the now-deleted screenshot of the chat, the sequence of postings is: You make a posting asking for better quality toilet paper. Someone (M) makes a straightforward reply that you need to go to facilities, who handle this. You then post asking if a bidet spray is an option. Another person (A) posts that ...


9

Is the total extent of AR's mockery this one post? If so, I really think you need to calm down. What do you expect HR to do? Do you think they're going to fire him because he made one snide remark about toilet paper? Or even give him some sort of formal reprimand? In a normal, healthy workplace, people joke around with each other all the time. Trying to ...


27

I seriously doubt that AR is going to mock you for asking about better toilet paper. What he will mock you for is acting as if a juvenile joke about toilet paper is a personal attack against you. If you take this mishmash to HR they are most likely to tell you that just because you have a sensitive asshole it is no reason for you to be a sensitive asshole. ...


84

Toughen up a bit. At this level, it's been one comment, poking fun at something you posted. It's obnoxious, but it's certainly not HR-level, and the fact that you think it is suggests that your sensitivity meter is dialed up too high by at least a few notches. You can offer cogent argument in the comments about how what you're suggesting is not the same ...


4

how do I react to it Ultimately, that's a question that needs a personal answer based on your own goals and your feelings. No one likes to be mocked, especially when making a helpful suggestion about a sensitive topic. But it's important to also keep in mind that those who mock are often just looking for attention - they want to get a rise out of you, and ...


1

You asked two questions, but unfortunately they're both hard or unsatisfying to answer. First: Why would they require such detailed information? It's hard to know why they would require that information, because reasons may vary. The most predictable reason is so that they can see if their salary range for this position is in line with your history. If ...


2

You should not resign until you have accepted your next job. Meanwhile, you should work as well and constructively as you can in your current job. You disagree with allowing a month for planning, but then say you do not yet know the use-cases that the system will have to handle. Maybe the month is intended to include time for you to learn, classify, and ...


3

At the risk of sounding like a finger-wagging old person, I'm going to frame challenge your question. You use phrases like high level, low level, or at my level but it's not really clear (to me at least) what those are supposed to mean. Being given near-complete autonomy to evaluate, plan, buy, set up, and support a software system sounds like a fairly "...


1

It is generally a good idea not to discuss leaving your job with your current employer until you have signed an offer for your next job. That is, if you tell your current employer that you wish to leave, they have no vested interest in keeping you around, and you have nowhere else to work (for the time being). So I would advise that you do not discuss this ...


2

should I be upfront and tell them that I feel that they lied to me about the position and I'm constantly bored or should I simply politely inform then that something better has come up? None. If you are set on leaving, do not accuse them of lying. You also do not need to sound smug by indicating how boring their job was and then telling them that you are ...


1

Apply for places before you leave (I know that being in that situation can help me get in gear with what I want out of my new job). Then once you leave just explain the situation as you have put in here and go through their formal procedure.


3

In this scenario in the UK it would be common for your employer to provide you with a rental car (either they have an account with a rental company or you pay and claim back through expenses). They may offer to reimburse at 45p/mile providing you have business insurance (commuting to another a place of work other than your usual fixed location may require ...


9

my work in flexible I.e. if I start at 7, can finish at 4. Given that your work is flexible (and thus your manager is ok with that) some options you can propose I can think of are: Ask to go pick your child and then come back to work, leaving some time later so you can do your daily hours. See if you can work remotely after you pick up your son. You can ...


4

You do not seem to understand the difference between declining a shift when the manager is doing the scheduling, and dropping an accepted shift with two hours notice on a Sunday. Think of it from her point of view. On Friday, if you had declined the shift, the manager could have easily scheduled someone else. On Sunday, with two hours notice, it would be ...


17

It's not practical to ask for a company car for a week. The distance could, depending on travel time, be considered beyond what might be expected as reasonable. For example, a 40-mile drive from say St Albans to Reading, that's a lot of heavy traffic and very busy roads and would easily take 90 minutes or more each way, more if there was a problem en route....


7

You forgot to mention your country, so I assume it is the U.K. Your company should reimburse your travelling cost which is 45p per mile driven, tax free.


0

Provided that there are no ad hominem attacks, the questioning of the value of fundraising staff is fair game. Nobody likes having their usefulness questioned, but it is nothing personal, and responding emotionally is a bad idea. It goes without saying that an effective fundraiser is expected to be bringing in a lot more money than his/her salary costs. To ...


-6

Every kind of organization was founded with the aim to make profit. This is also true for non-profit and charity organizations which aren't depended on financial benefit but on the applause they get form their customers. If the customer of an organization is satisfied he will reward it. In the special case with the co-workers who have made a small rant ...


13

First by way of reassurance, it is probably worth mentioning that it won't be your colleagues who decide who if anybody is let go from your organization. It will be your boss, who hopefully has a much better idea of your value to the organization. However this does indicate a slight problem with communication which you might do well to address. First I ...


1

Is my employer discriminating against non-parents? In the strict, non-legal sense of the term "discriminating", Yes. If so, is this discrimination allowed by UK employment law? Yes, this is allowed by UK employment law. Other than by having children, how should I go about getting a similar allowance of unpaid leave? You can talk to your employer, ...


10

Are you being discriminated against? Absolutely. Discriminate simply means favoring something for some reason. It generally does have an aspect of lacking fairness, but does not equate to illegal. There’s no way to be totally fair to everyone. And parental rights are such a mixed bag. Some people never have kids while others do. Some who never planned ...


2

I'll "third" the recommendation that you contact a lawyer. You have two choices. The first is to take the information to your current employer, explain how much you enjoy working there, and how you believe you are a valuable asset. Then you ask for more money. It sounds like you have a valid offer in hand, but don't want to leave. This is the "I have done ...


1

I second the "talk to a lawyer" advice, and to not blindly trust a recruiter. Little anecdote : I had a non-compete clause in my contract (I'm from Belgium, so the laws might not be the same in the UK). In Belgium, a non-compete clause has to pass certain requirements to be legal : a minimum salary, some industries aren't eligible,... And even if the ...


2

Is my employer discriminating against non-parents? Legally speaking no - the enshrining of parental leave in law is primarily there to protect parents from being disadvantaged in the workforce, essentially preventing them being discriminated against. Does it get abused? Yes, I've seen it happen - is the abuse endemic and a huge problem? No, not in my ...


14

Talk to a lawyer Your recruiter isn't paid to know the law, they are paid to sign you up to companies. I've personally seen some very shady behaviour from some recruiters in the past, and without knowing this one, I wouldn't rule out that they may be lying to you. With that said, in some jurisdictions, it is true that non-compete clauses are either ...


1

I've recently worked for two startups, my previous around 65 employees, my current around 10. I was asked this in both interviews and it's even in my contract for both companies: conform to such hours of work as may from time to time be reasonably required of him on the understanding that the performance of his duties may require the Employee to work ...


24

You asked three questions, Is my employer discriminating against non-parents? If so, is this discrimination allowed by UK employment law? Employment law in the UK currently classifies parental leave as a protected right. That is, the law protects the right of parents to take leave. This seems to inherently imply that such leave is not considered ...


0

If I were in your shoes and they wanted that from me, if I wanted to accept I would still ask for toil time. This is where in return for your overtime hours, you get a few hours off to recuperate as necessary. Managers will typically have an easier time giving you time off than overpay, and as such overtime is typically used in an emergency situation, it ...


0

I come from a large company where overtime pay is expected and thought it was the norm everywhere (within UK). Am I being unrealistic? No you are not being unrealistic. The only legitimate reason for having to work overtime is an emergency. Anything else is poor management of time/planning on the part of management and/or the employee. It is understood ...


0

I feel a bit deflated that they're already essentially asking me to work unpaid overtime before I've even begun. Go with that feeling. I'd have clarified at the time to make sure they're talking about unpaid overtime. But not getting extra if you're on a salary is normal.


-3

My response to this question is "I prefer to not work overtime, but I understand crunch time happens, so I'm OK working small amounts of overtime from time to time provided it's not habitual". The problem with this question and also this answer is that, if this answer is acceptable, the question shouldn't need to be asked; it should be understood that if ...


18

I'd tell them: "That's OK, assuming that it's indeed sometimes and not most of the time, and that the company is also OK with me sometimes having to come late or leave early, on both sides within reasonable limits". These are the points I'm trying to illustrate: Any company can sometimes find itself in a situation where some overtime is needed; but if that ...


0

Just lie to that recruiter that you have of course withdrawn your other applications. He is just a cheapskate who desperately needs the money he only gets if you sign a contract. The request is unfair and unreasonable, and imo very close to criminal coercion. So he cannot do anything about it if you lie That recruiter has no reasonable or legitimate way to ...


5

Consider doubling down If you get the question are you pursuing other positions? This should be translated as How do you present your position and what setting would you like negotiations to take place in? The answer should depend on your preferences: If you want to be flexible, show dedication, and allow for delays without losing credibility or ...


6

Don't follow up, ask informally. Your manager stated that a policy is in place that prevent this: ask HR (replace HR with the relevant internal body in charge of these policies if different) without naming any name if there is a policy dealing with work abroad, since you know that connections are monitored. Better if you can ask to someone directly (John or ...


52

I worked previously as a recruiter including with a couple of staffing agencies. Yes, it is common practice for agency recruiters to request that you withdraw from any other positions, including to ask to be BCC'd on messages to those other opportunities/recruiters/hiring managers. They are trying to do everything they can to land the deal, which includes ...


6

If you wish to continue working with this shady recruiter then your next response should be something like: Hi Recruiter, Withdrawing my applications from elsewhere is not something I am comfortable doing unless I have signed an official offer letter from your client. I assure you that if I choose to sign your client's offer letter then I am not ...


53

Seems fishy. It could be incompetence or it could be malicious. Most likely it is an incompetent attempt at being malicious. You've got three choices: Politely ask for more details but make it clear that you will not cancel your job search until you have a clear and complete job offer. Cut ties with the recruiter. Send an email saying that you are no ...


378

So my question is, is it normal for recruitment agents to send out job offers without any details? In my experience, that is not at all normal. I've never encountered it personally, nor have I ever heard of it before. As a hiring manager, I never required anything like it from applicants. If not, what details should I expect in a proper job offer? I ...


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