New answers tagged

4

But how can she slip her business card without worrying about other employees noticing? Why would she worry? It's a perfectly legal and ethical thing to do. Worst that can happen is that she will get asked to leave the store. What if her business card's forwarded to the competitor's legal counsel who may sue her in tort? IANAL, but perhaps tortious ...


5

I don't work in retail, but in my area of expertise there are a lot of headhunters. They might even call me on my work phone, while I'm at work to offer me an opportunity. Even though my boss is in the same office and can hear what I have to say over the phone. They don't care if anyone notices and frankly, what are you going to do? You can only tell them ...


3

All the scout has to do is to come into the store as a "normal" customer, spend 5 minutes trying a coat or dress or whatever, and as part of the process they always talk... Do you like it here? How long have you been here? etc Then, at the end they say to your operative "thank you for helping me so well, if you want a different opportunity contact me and ...


11

It is perfectly legal for a competitor to talk to your employees and offer them a job elsewehere. The "scout" wouldn't have to keep this secret at all. She doesn't need to worry that it gets noticed if the scout gives someone a business card, because it's perfectly fine. If someone notices, they are given a business card as well. If they talk to someone and ...


1

Sorry for your loss. Are you asking when you think it's a good idea to return to work? If so, I recommend taking as long as you need. At the very least enough time to take care of her funeral, expenses, paperwork, will, stopping any auto payments (social security, retirements, etc do not spend this money as they will ask it back or do a reversal from the ...


12

Before anything, deeply sorry for your loss. Regarding your question, I would say that there is not a strict guide on that. Every person reacts differently to pain and loss, and have different needs. Some would like to vanish from the world, others would look for company all the time, and so on. So, my suggestion would be to you get in touch with your ...


2

The NHS is largely funded from taxes, including employment related taxes, but it is not an employment-related insurance system. It is a service, primarily for UK residents. There are complications such as fee-for-service for some services to visitors. Some visa types require a contribution to the NHS. The simplest case, and the one that seems to apply here,...


3

When taking a couple months of unpaid sabbatical in the UK, the employer will usually drop all benefits until the employee is back. Quite certain this policy would cut the national health insurance payments too. What are the options to maintain cover by health insurance during the sabbatical ? Not asking about the private health insurance, but ...


1

You don’t want a travel insurance for coverage in your home country. Uk coverage should be worked out with nhs. In a travel insurance policy look at coverage that will get you back home. If it’s serious that’s where you want to be. Air ambulance is very expensive. Your travel insurance may offer coverage to reimburse your unused hotel and airfare. In my ...


-1

I understand that you do not wish to disclose your reasons to us, please don't take this answer as insistence on that. If your condition is not absolutely unique (and with over 7 billion people on Earth it most likely isn't), then talking to other people with that limitation and how they dealt with it could be a good idea. Phone calls for interviews are ...


-7

When they email to arrange a call ask for their physical address as a scam check. Turn up in person at 9am saying you "were in the area".


7

It might help to phrase things as follows: I regret that I am not reachable by telephone, however I would be happy to travel to answer any questions you may have in person. First, you present the issue with phone calls as part of your situation. If you say that you are "unavailable" for a phone interview, many people will think "well, make yourself ...


1

Leave it alone. It's worth pointing out that neither you nor your partner actually has anything to give to the police. You've no evidence, save for a second-hand description from someone else that would not be involved in the report, and no clear demonstration that your partner was harmed by the accountant in any way (there was clearly a business case for ...


0

Just offer to buy coffee / tea / lunch to discuss it. You don't even need to mention phone limitations. Who would turn down a free meal? Plus it shows that you are assertive and seriously interested. Or even just drop by their office (if they have one) on your own time. Remember, recruiters make money off of placing jobs. They will work with you if ...


1

"Are you available for me to call you?" How do I communicate that I cannot undertake that part of their preferred process, and I would gladly enter into an alternative? Just offer the alternative. And acknowledge that you are asking for a deviation. I'm sorry for the inconvenience, but as I mentioned, I'm not available for phone calls (nor ...


0

Much of what you've stated seems to be subjective, unless you can prove your points with factual evidence. Example: I suspect that the accountant suggested redundancy for my partner, as she was the only other employee who had access to the accounts, and so her main 'threat'. This redundancy caused my partner some considerable financial and emotional ...


8

Look at the potential costs vs the potential gains when you make your decision. You stand to gain: The satisfaction of taking retribution against someone who hurt your partner. The comfort of knowing you've done everything you could to expose this person's ethical bankruptcy. However you shouldn't rule out the risks and potential costs - she will ...


83

Provide the reason you are unable to field phone calls. It is not necessary to be specific - vague language like: "I have a condition which (temporarily/permanently) prevents me from using a phone" or "I do not have ready access to a phone/network connection suitable for voice communication" would be sufficient. It is not necessary to invite or ...


62

I think that being unable to take a phone call is going to be so unusual to a recruiter (or a prospective employer) that unless you can give a good reason they'll just perceive you as "awkward" and pass over your application. The best reason is usually the truth, e.g. My location has no cell/data coverage and I only have limited web access. I can call ...


145

A former co-worker, not a recruiter but someone who deals with a ton of email, once told me that she only scans emails for the important information because that's what they're told to do. Many recruiters are likely doing the same thing: scanning your email for a phone number and then emailing you when they can't find it rather than carefully reading it and ...


63

If you have a medical condition that prevents you from using a phone, you should be upfront about the restriction. You don’t need to clarify what the specific condition is, but you should include the limitation clearly in your cover letters. You should also disclose the preference for email as early as possible in discussions with recruiters (e.g., in an ...


27

Please note that eliminating the possibility of a phone call will cause some recruiters to refuse to work with you and will cause all sorts of problems with others that would make them less helpful for you. That being said, if you want to communicate your no phone policy then you need to do so in your initial communication and do so definitively. Say ...


3

Are you available for me to call you? Simply answer it politely. You don't need to give any specific justifications, just need to put your request clearly. Sorry, I won't be able to take any phone calls. Please communicate over email and I'll make sure to respond promptly. I prefer email over phone as it makes the communication un-rushed/convenient and ...


1

Are there areas of good practice that you haven't mentioned or are flat out unaware of? It is unusual for anyone to be great at every aspect of their job, especially one requiring such a complex (and recently developed) knowledge base. Additionally, new hires are sometimes selected to cover known weaknesses. It is plausible that your technical lead has ...


4

Do you think you would be better fit for Lead Data Scientist? Because this is what your manager will glean from your approaching him about the current one`s shortcomings. Even if you mention that you are NOT gunning for the promotion


4

This is a VERY VERY tricky situation and you have to be very strategic about how you do this. Before you run to any PM with your complaints you need to back everything up with proof. You need: dates Times Type of incident(problem committing a git branch/adding new git branch Summary of what was said by either party regarding any disagreements you said ...


2

First of all, remember one thing, you are not in charge of reviewing the work (pattern or habit) for the lead - so go ahead raising a flag only if their behavior is a problem and has a direct impact on your work outputs. In case, due to their work habit, you (and others) are facing difficulties, I'd suggest the following steps: Try noting down the ...


4

Sharing your exact age is up to you, but I would keep it private. Sharing that you're 22 could seem a bit cavalier early in your tenure. Things you can do while you settle in to the role: 1. Focus on demonstrating your capabilities. If you're smart and do good work, your colleagues will notice and quickly respect your opinion and leadership. 2. Get ...


3

Should I avoid revealing my age at a new role? At your age, it isn't a big deal to reveal your age if you so choose. However, as you get older, you will find out about this thing called age discrimination. There is no magic number for this, but in my experience it started happening when I was in my early 40's. Employers typically want young workers like ...


6

No harm in having a CV ready to go out and be keeping an eye on the vacancies, or even send them out. However, it's possible she could receive a redundancy payment if she is laid off - if that's the case, she should not leave because she's afraid of being made redundant!


10

Yep they are well within their rights to not class that as a "sick" day - you aren't off work through being unfit that day but instead taking scheduled time off for a hospital appointment. So it would be covered under normal policies (and applicable laws) for annual leave rather than sickness - obviously your employment contract can offer more than the ...


1

Making people redundant is actually a lot of work. Nobody does that "just because". A company that lays off people is in financial trouble or had a merger recently that actually created an obvious redundancy. Laying off people will not solve the financial problems of a company. You might be next. Or maybe not. But that's not your decision. Somebody will ...


1

Since this is an agreement in excess of the Statutory Sick Pay (which kicks in after 3 waiting days), there is no further legal requirement on what's covered. If the company voluntarily chooses to pay for the statutory waiting days except on Mondays, that would be legal too.


14

There's no need to hide it, or to be upfront about it when not asked. If asked, you should be honest, however (since people can find out anyway). If questioned, just state that you started early and worked hard to get where you are now.


2

she has been told by the CEO when he was on a visit to their office, that she (and her entire satellite office) will be ok Likely to be a nice tactic by the CEO to try to stop people leaving early, IMHO. Perhaps I'm particularly sceptical, but if anything I'd actually read the opposite into that. I'd think the CEO knows I'm likely to be made redundant, but ...


0

Are they correct, does attending this appointment not class as a sick day? Yes, I'm afraid they're correct. The only possible exceptions I'm aware of are if it's pregnancy related, or if its disability related. In those cases it's often far from black and white though, so even then there's not a great deal you can do unless you get a lawyer involved who ...


12

Talk is cheap. I think she should be worried. The CEO probably wants your friend and others like her to work until he decides who goes and who stays. If people start to leave because they are likely to be laid off it might create problems for the company. If the CEO can make his life easier by being optimistic, why shouldn't he do that. If he had said "...


1

Your employer uses a 'repayment of training cost clause', which is essentially a debt you acknowledge and that is written off as long as you stick around. If the certification does not benefit you in your current role and does not make you a more valuable candidate when job-hunting, then you should not take the cert under those conditions. Your superiors ...


3

There are no specific interviewing norms in the UK beyond the obvious basics: Be prepared to discuss and demonstrate your skills (with examples of prior work/challenges) Be prepared to be asked about aspects of your CV/resume Be presentable Be on time Be polite Do research on the company you're interviewing for (this will be expected) Show them ...


8

You are starting this question from the position of: Joe got promotion but Jane deserves it much more. How can she use that in an argument? In reality we should assume that promotion and demotion decisions are based not on "who deserves it" but on business needs and value to the company. I put quotes around "deserve" because that is your opinion and you ...


3

DISCLAIMER: I am not a lawyer. If any unpaid leave was taken in each year before now, it should have been deducted from your salary in that year because it would have affected how much tax you have to pay in that year. The company should also have either not authorised the extra holiday in that year OR reduced your allowance for the following year so you ...


5

Welcome James, but you should probably address this to the StackExchange legal group. The answer depends on too many unknowns. Your best bet is to book an appointment with a local Citizens Advice Bureau and take all company paperwork with you, especially your contract of employment and any company policy documents (employee handbook etc). Your immediate ...


4

Were any pay-cuts being done against your unpaid leaves when you were paid your salary after your leaves? Generally followed industry practise is to deduct against any unpaid leaves from the due salary in the next pay cycle. Legally speaking, you are bound by the original terms of job offer from the employer as stated in the offer letter and agreed by you, ...


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