New answers tagged

0

Is there a possibility I am entitled to £8,333? No. or would it just be seen as an error with the comma being where a decimal point should be? Of course it would be seen as a mistake. On UK keyboards the comma and full stop keys tend to be next to each other. The amount you want it to be is 100 times more than what it is. You yourself say the ...


2

"£83,33" is how one might print the Sterling amount eighty three pounds thirty three pennies in a locale in which "," is the decimal separator, so it can certainly exist. This is just like writing €10.33 in the USA or UK, even though many, if not all, countries that use the Euro as their currency use a comma as the decimal separator. The other use of comma ...


0

I respectfully suggest you wait until your company can bring people back from furloughs before you pursue this question. You can certainly tell your replacement manager you like working for them. But the timing, in the middle of a health crisis, is very likely not so good to try to ask for a change like this.


0

I would approach your temporary line manager first and discuss this with him. He'll probably know if staying with him is an option. If staying with him isn't an option then there's a good chance your furloughed line manager will never even know that the conversation took place. If staying with him is an option then I'd play that by ear. It's quite possible ...


2

In your particular situation (call handler at the U.K. National Health I'd first check if you can’t start that new job earlier. Like tomorrow. Check how much notice your employer has to give you legally / according to your contract. And check if they are decent people. If not, you give notice at the last possible moment (when it’s legally required). If yes,...


0

I think I can help. If you are currently serving your notice period or have officially left the Company you previous worked for you are not automatically eligible for the government furlough payment which covers 80% of employees regardless of contract types on or before 28/02/2020 at a maximum claim of £2500 per month with a maximum annual salary of £37,...


0

Depends on the amount of reduction. Would the suggestion bring you below the threshold for furlough i.e. would their reduction bring you to below £30,000 if so you and possibly the company would be better invoking the furlough for as many non-essential staff if they think they are going to have money issues rather than ask everyone for a paycut. In terms ...


1

On a purely emotional and risk-assessing level, yes, you should be concerned. It is a clear sign that your company is anticipating financial losses or at least a much reduced cash flow in the near future. However, this is separate from the question whether you should agree to these terms. I would suggest an alternative not yet mentioned in other answers: ...


1

Its my understanding that if the company where to apply for the UK government furlough scheme you are required to be a full time employee for them to get the grants, employees that have been let go or have left, are not entitled. So sadly if you're not full time with them then you're not entitled to it. However during your notice period, you are a full ...


4

I have a different take on this. Am I overreacting here? Yes. My feelings are that the company is supposed to plan to survive bad situations That is true to an extent. However, this is a extraordinarily bad situation - one of the worst in living memory. The Secretary General of the UN has said that the Covid-19 pandemic is the greatest test since ...


2

I've had something like this happen to me at a former employer. External events put the company (and that entire industry) in a very bad position. Most of the time, a company would lay off a portion of its staff in order to stay afloat. Our management saw that the situation was external and temporary in nature, and that there was no reason for the company ...


4

There's a mix of good and bad advice in the answers already, with few actionable items to work from, so I'll focus on what you can do right now and without spending any money, or as little as possible. Here's a list of sites that teach you coding for free. I have used some of them and I'm affiliated with exactly none of them. Learning: GitHub Get ...


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According to Martin Lewis' website https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/news/2020/03/coronavirus-self-employed-and-employment-help/ furlough may be available to you but it is up to your old employers. This has been clarified with the government. Lost your job due to coronavirus, or were in process of changing job? Furlough may still be available - but it's ...


2

To play devils advocate you may want to consider what is happening with regards to the business projects and on-going work and how that is factored in to this decision. There might be a genuine business reason for reducing pay but keeping the hours. Ongoing commitments Your business might get £X revenue for maintaining software Y. If the company furloughs ...


22

Am I entitled to Furlough payment, despite the fact I had handed in my 4 weeks written notice? In short, no you aren't entitled to it, the employer is the one who makes a claim for it and it's up to them whether they want to furlough an employee - they need the employee's consent to do so but the employee can't demand that the company furlough them. As @...


20

It's easier to teach a violinist to play bongos than the other way 'round Remember that anytime you worry about your coding abilities. Coding is a thing you do need to know how to do. But it is not terribly hard, especially since computers and languages were invented by mathematicians. So the mindsets inherent in programming should come naturally to ...


11

From experience (in a german startup), something to consider: Company asked for reduced work with reduced pay for a few months, that was okay for me. Later the company still tanked, leaving me unemployed. I immediately found something new, but if not, I would have gotten less unemployment money from the state because they look at the income in the last 12 ...


12

I am a Data Scientist with a Mathematics Master's degree! I can share my own experience. Do Kaggle competitions!. Start with Titanic first, you can have a look at other people's code to give you ideas, write your own code and put it on your Github. Then you can try other competitions. This will give you experience on "real world" projects. There are not ...


2

Frankly, a lot of job openings read like they want unicorns who somehow are fresh graduates that have mastered statistics, general coding, and database management. This isn’t as rare as you might think. A few online courses will give you all the general programming background you’ll need for an entry level data science job. Combine this with the statistics ...


4

Two additional points: A lot of what professional programmers and Data Scientists do is interact with systems like Spark, Docker, Git, GitHub*, Power BI*, SQL Server*, Jupyter Notebooks, Azure*, AWS. Each of these is extremely popular and there's tons of free learning content on, even for the ones that are pure cloud services. And there's always a spot on ...


21

Those of us with gray hair have likely had this happen on several occasions. It would not be appropriate for us to advise you on whether or not to accept these new terms. This is part of your personal career management. However, if you do choose to accept this, I would recommend you have: A clear list of criteria that determined why this request is ...


8

My intuition says that what I'm being asked is to work the same for less compensation, which is unreasonable. If you find it unreasonable then your only option is to reject it, and take your chances that they don't let you go outright. My feelings are that the company is supposed to plan to survive bad situations - and the compensation I receive was ...


31

If the company genuinely has too many employees and not enough work, then they should accept you working reduced hours for reduced pay. Then when the work picks up, you go back to full-time. If the company's response is there is still the same amount of work to be done, then employees' jobs are not redundant - and it sounds like the problem is cash flow ...


69

It's never a good sign - and I think you're correct to be concerned, but it doesn't necessarily reflect particularly on your current employer. Many companies the world over are struggling or facing an uncertain future right now and it doesn't necessarily mean that they were in a precarious position before this all started. ..to avoid redundancies across ...


13

Usually when they ask for volunteers, it means they are simply asking but later on some folks might be voluntold. As for the whole noble task, I must caution that you must see the benefits of it. At the end of the day, the company is protecting itself. By letting them profit, you get nothing in return. Now that sounds a bit selfish, but the company is ...


3

The advantage you have over other candidates is your mathematics. Mathematicians can learn to code, but generally speaking computer science graduates mathematical ability is on a steep downward trajectory after graduation. I should know I am a physics and computer science major and can barely do math 30 years on from university now just doing commercial ...


26

Start a project. Think of something you are interested in, that a code based solution would work well for (a simple noughts and crosses game, storing statistics of a D&D session, simulating rolling dice and reporting the results to a number of users etc etc etc) and then do it - put the code up on Github in a public repository, and learn. Improve the ...


49

This: Due to my programming time at university, in a roundabout way, I've already learned. Does not align at all with this: If you gave me any FizzBuzz-like question, I would expect to fail it. Do you know where FizzBuzz came from? It is meant as a quick programming problem to screen out those who cannot code at all so that the interviewer doesn't ...


249

Not to be rude, but if If you gave me any FizzBuzz-like question, I would expect to fail it. Then you can't code at all. The only thing fizzbuzz do is weed out candidates who cannot code. If you want reasonably respected coding qualification The only thing you can do is get mileage. And lots of it. Implement small webapps, small prototypes, write ...


8

Having a degree in Mathematics is no trivial thing. A lot of people can code, but only a small minority of these people can easily translate a mathematical problem into code, and that is very often a crucial question in sectors like fintech and automotive. What's more, it's known that when someone studies Mathematics, one also has to get an experience in ...


112

Speaking as somebody who has been a developer and a team leader in in this industry for a long time now... I don't care about your qualifications. At all. When I have your CV in front of me I care about your attention to detail with the CV (spelling, layout, font consistency), and I care about demonstrable relevant experience. By demonstrable relevant ...


10

According to ACAS, right now on the 26th of March, you have no protection against your employer's arbitrariness when it comes to working from home. You can talk to your employer, but the usual rules apply and they don't have to agree to anything or do anything in particular to protect your or society. It sounds like you've already done this? You might also ...


0

Same advice to all those other questions, stay at home and explain to the boss that you can either work from home or they can count those days against your PTO, as per gov instructions you are not commuting to work (feel free to send them a link to latest Boris speech). The worst-case they can try to fire you, but that won't stick through an employment ...


1

So a couple of things to note here but I will start by saying I completely get your anxiety. My partner is in exactly the same position and we are worried especially with me being a vulnerable person (severe asthma). The government have said that they are already taking into account that not all offices will close and that some people will have to go into ...


-4

Maybe an email sent early in the morning will help: “Sorry boss, but I was stopped by police this morning. They asked if it was essential for me to go to the office, and I wouldn’t lie to the police, so they sent me home”. If you’re in an office in London, I would strongly recommend you go by car to pick up your computer, pay congestion charge, whatever, ...


4

Pay cuts are often used by companies as an alternative to layoffs during worsened financial conditions. If the employer is experiencing lower revenues due to the pandemic, then 20% pay cuts could be justified as the alternative is 100% pay cuts for some staff. Now, it could be that the employer is trying to pull a fast one, in which case the girlfriend ...


32

The 80% of salary (up to £2,500 per month) is only for employees who are furloughed and are not doing any work. If girlfriend is doing any work then she must be paid as normal by her employer for that work -- whether she gets paid a full salary, or pro-rata, or per hour, depends on her employment contract. 80% of gross wages in the private sector, up to £...


6

The UK Government has announced that it will pay 80% of wages for those not working in coronavirus crisis. (https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/mar/20/government-pay-wages-jobs-coronavirus-rishi-sunak) So I think the answer now is to see what your boss says on Monday


2

I don't know the specifics of UK labor-laws, rights and regulations, however are you sure any (temporary) employment benefits you are entitled to are not more than 50% percent of your current salary ? If so, this proposal sounds like a terrible deal. Especially if your company goes down in a few months anyway, in which case you still lose your job and have ...


5

Honestly, yes. Given the economic reality we're now in, it's both fair and reasonable. Many companies are going to be doing even worse. Doesn't mean you can't negotiate though. I'd recommend negotiating for (temporarily) reduced pay, at full hours, in return for additional Paid Time Off next year. Half pay for (say) 3 months would equate to an additional 6 ...


9

In this scenario, if you accept those conditions you'll be effectively subsidising your employer's business, in the form of the withheld salary you won't be receiving by working part time for a full time job. You have a few ways of responding: one way would be asking for a written commitment from your employer to pay you later a bonus in proportion to the ...


18

Bad situation. If you accept then make sure that you don't lose anything (beyond the salary). Negotiate with the boss. Reasonable terms would be a contract that says: This is a temporary change of your salary. It will return to the full salary as soon as the crisis is over. Any redundancy payment will be calculated based on the original, full salary. ...


48

At this time of coronavirus it's valid for a company to look at alternatives to keep afloat, reduced hours is one, redundancy is another, shutting the company completely is yet another. It's important to keep in mind that we in the UK are going to go through a very hard time, obviously this is speculation, but given past events and what's currently ...


1

I would think a unilateral change to the start date, preventing you from starting on the day previously agreed, would be a breach of contract. But what can you or are you prepared to do about it? The problem is that even if the employer is not legally allowed to do that, you may in practice be able to do nothing about it. And if they say they want to ...


0

How the coronavirus epidemic will affect your job depends on your role and responsibilities, and on the company itself. They already went through the whole hiring process with you, the only case where your hiring would be cancelled is in case of an exceptional downsizing. However... we still don't know how the epidemic will affect the economy six months ...


24

I understand the discomfort you must be feeling right now - but I'm afraid these are really questions you will have to direct to your new employer. But that said there are a few things we can clear up: Can my new employer move my start date back? (if so will I have no income for weeks/months?) This is a grey area - if they've already put your start date ...


11

or am I being melodramatic? Yes, I think a little bit. It's just another factor to be considered. Realistically you analyse a companies stability anyway regardless of pandemics or anything else. During any economic problems some companies will actually do very well. The fact that you're looking at the larger picture is a good sign for your future in ...


37

Yes this is a valid concern and no you are not being melodramatic. It's surprising to most employees how little capital some businesses actual have. You've worked there for 3 years what's another 3 months at which point we'll know a little more of what effect this has all had. My advice is to stay put at the moment. Note: If your company looks like it's ...


90

I have two interviews lined up, but I'm concerned that stagnation of the economy could lead to redundancies in any organisation, and as the "new guy" I'd be the first out the door if it came to that. Is this a valid concern, and therefore should I think very carefully before handing in notice given the current situation - or am I being melodramatic? You'd ...


13

as the "new guy" I'd be the first out the door...Is this a valid concern Yes. But that's always a concern, especially if we head into a recession. I'd be more worried about new travel arrangements, employee onboarding during all this, new social interactions - Infection related concerns, rather than employment ones.


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