New answers tagged

0

Contrary to what many of the answers have said and your own suspicions, you probably haven't been fired. It's likely your contract has been terminated by mutual consent. In giving notice you have requested a termination of contract and as you say I stated that I was happy to work my 2 week notice period Your employer has stated that that will not be ...


1

Is it discrimination that our work Christmas party is not at a time I, as a part time worker, can go? No, that is not at all discrimination in the legal sense. Everyone who does work at that time gets paid to go to the party, a free drink and dinner - this doesn't seem fair? It doesn't seem completely fair to me either. I'm guessing that you are ...


2

So If I understand correctly, the Christmas party starts during the afternoon and will probably extend to after work-hours? You only work the morning? Attendance is optional? So nobody will get any more pay then what they would usually get. Nobody gets any less pay then they would usually get. Everybody gets free drinks and food. Some people get some hours ...


3

Is it discrimination? No. They didn't schedule the party so as to specifically exclude you. They scheduled it to accommodate the majority of the employees and to minimize any impact to the business if the party is scheduled during work hours. Don't take it personally. If you can attend, then do so. If you can't, then don't.


2

In short, yes and yes (though not directly). First of all, allow me to say that although it does appear as if your boss is not the perfect boss, you are truly being the issue. Forgive me for saying it so directly. Consider your attitude, and pay attention to the wording when reflecting on what you wrote yourself. I've added some emphasis: Me [and my boss]...


-1

Contrary to the other answers, I believe that while morally you're just as much in the wrong as your boss, legally you have the (slightly) stronger standing. Assumption A: Your boss cannot prove that you weren't ill. Assumption B: Your contract doesn't require you to get a doctor's statement on the first day of illness. (many contracts make this like 3 days)...


-4

Another way is simply to omit the employment from your CV and say you were travelling or studying over that period.


3

My situation is a little different to others I really don't think so. This situation is literally the thing everybody on YouTube is making fun of when they make fun of Millenials in the workplace. Me and my boss do not have a very good relationship on a personal level, we often argue about the morals and future of the company, he is the sort of person ...


67

To address the main question: can you be fired immediately in response to giving notice? No. You have certain rights when you are dismissed. An employer can give you what is often called a counter-notice but this cannot be less than the minimum term required by your contract. If none is defined the legal minimum is 1 week. Immediate or summary dismissal ...


6

Note: I'm assuming OP lives in the UK, judging by their name and reference to London. Let's get the answer that you want to hear out of the way- no, a company cannot terminate you without cause and resigning is not a valid cause. Sometimes an employee will be asked to leave immediately rather than working notice but in that case they are still paid and ...


13

To answer your first question, yes you can be fired even if you have handed in your notice. Until you are no longer employed by the company they can, if they have cause, fire you whether its during resignation or redundancy etc. Most likely, given my own experience of a few businesses, your disciplinary hearing will have found you to have been guilty of ...


114

You (ex) boss doesn't sound like the easiest person to work for, however being honest you don't sound like the easiest person to employ either. uses the profits from the business to go on expensive holidays at least once or twice a month Yep, that's kind of what profits are for. A few weeks ago I asked for a day off as I had been given tickets to go ...


2

You admitted to faking a sickness to get a day off. That alone is enough to be subjected to disciplinary action or dismissal - at your boss's discretion. However it seems that you managed to get a resignation letter in before your boss gave you the termination notice, which may put you at an advantage if you decide to fight this. I propose seeking counsel ...


37

Lying about being sick to avoid work is likely enough to get you fired, and then instead of attending the disciplinary review to give an explanation for your action you've given them notice to quit. This very much sealed your fate, and while people cannot generally just get fired without notice, what you did is very severe. I know it may seem like something ...


8

how can I know if a recruiter has a job I'm interested in before I tell them my whole story? Ask them. Make it the first thing you do in the conversation. If they open with a bunch of questions about you, then simply ask them "First, can you tell me about the position you're calling about please?" (or a similar question in a polite, professional and ...


11

Here is how recruiters work: they usually get payed large sums of money by the employer once a candidate they referred gets a contract (usually tied to the entry-salary). They do not work for you, they work for the prospective employers. You are their raw-material, so to speak. So they like to build up a database of candidates to quickly refer a suitable ...


3

You won't need travel insurance, nor a visa, to work in the UK currently. We're still in the EU which means you'll be covered by the NHS as standard. Nobody knows what will happen when we leave, not even the people pushing Brexit through the pipeline currently. Social insurance: As I keep my residence in Germany and stay here > 180 days this should not ...


1

Office rental might be expensive. The best deals on offices tend to be for longer (12 month+) durations and obviously the cost also varies dependent on location and facilities. There are a number of companies (e.g. Regus) which offer semi-permanent or shared space or hotdesks, although that may be unsuitable if you have much more than a laptop (it's a ...


2

Reading the site referenced by the OP under "What kind of staff are covered by the rules?" I see: People in generic roles that are same for insurance and non-insurance companies are not covered by the rules. The FCA has listed some examples of these kind of roles, saying: ‘The requirements will not apply to employees in ancillary roles such as HR, ...


2

Yes, this is a legal requirement. You are closely involved in the design of communication channels that customers base financial decisions on. Your employer is obligated to make you complete this training. Given that you're in a more technical role and have little do do with the design of financial products, this may seem like a waste of your time. Consider ...


0

You can put it to your resume , because HR can see that you have experience even that for only a month / 28 days. The point is , if you put it to your resume , you must can explain what you are doing in that job for a month , and the most important thing : Don't Lie and it should be fine .


4

Don't put it on your resume A resume is a marketing document. You wouldn't put in a sales brochure that the prior owner of a house left after only a month. Something should only go on the resume if it makes you look good. Just leave it off. It will seem like you were unemployed for two months (assuming your prior job search took a month). Should I ...


0

The job didn't last for a full month and ended at a 28 days Should I mention it in my CV or not as prior to that job I was made redundant after 6.5 months. You can choose to leave anything you like off of your resume. Just be prepared to explain what you have been doing for the past month without lying about it. Lies can be uncovered, and the hiring ...


2

After that the line manager started being passive-aggressive and then when there was an opening for a better position, the line manager promoted someone else instead of the employee that deserved it. If the manager has actually selected somebody that is unqualified for the position in question, then it's only a matter of time, before a manager position will ...


9

Realistically, no, it's not a legal issue. Promoting someone that the manager likes over someone that is somehow objectively more qualified is perfectly legal unless some protected characteristic is involved. It is generally poor business practice to promote unqualified candidates and it can demotivate other employees but it isn't illegal. There may be ...


0

Yes, if your employer overpays you by mistake, you have to pay them back. This is enshrined in a lot of case law. Attempting to challenge it is a waste of time. It's worse than that, because by pointing out the lack of tax and NI deductions you are in effect asking them to pay your taxes for you. Had you, and they, done nothing you would have had to pay ...


-4

You would not have an accountant as this was paid as a PAYE payment as an ex-employee. The settlement was not backpay but a withdrawal and confidentiality payment. The approx.40k was the tax supposedly to be paid on the settlement amount. the company used a number of tactics to ensure I closed down the claim. the error was pointed out by myself, under HMRC ...


9

If the goal here is to get rehired - do nothing. You would be wasting your time. You weren't employed there long enough and weren't dismissed for an "automatically unfair" reason so you cannot challenge the dismissal. It sucks, I get that - but there's simply no legal basis to challenge this on and you've already been through their internal processes (twice)...


2

I see what the employer is trying to do here - they are trying to avoid having the expense and hassle of putting someone through vetting if they are going to fail it. And really they are doing so with reasonable intentions. But that doesn't mean it's okay as I discussed in my answer here these sorts of questions are normal and valid for security vetting ...


-4

GDPR restrictions Any answers relating to "signs of mental or physical illness" is health data, which falls under the scope of GDPR Article 9 "Processing of special categories of personal data". Much stricter than the protection of 'ordinary' personal data, handling such data is prohibited by default (Article 9.1) unless particular specific exceptional ...


7

These references aren't standard, run of the mill references that employers request every time you move between jobs. These are specifically in relation for security vetting, and the entire purpose will to see whether or not you are suitable to be given access to Security Cleared documentation and work on particular projects. I would suggest this is likely ...


4

Just as a general point: Your current employer can ask your former employer whatever they like. Whether your former employer can legally answer in any kind of detail is another matter. Whether they would answer in that kind of detail is another still. Most employers, in order to avoid the potential for lawsuits, won't confirm anything beyond job titles ...


3

That word sensitive is evocative. This sort of question is exactly what FBI or OPM agents are checking into when doing a security clearance investigation for a potential US government employee. Although everyone agrees this sort of questioning is uncomfortable, I certainly wouldn’t take it personally. Your employer — which may well be a government agency or ...


24

Notice period is calculated in calendar days (not working days) so the weekend is included, the notice period begins the day after you give notice (not the same day) so if you gave notice on the 15th of then the first day of your notice period is actually the 16th making the last day of your notice period the 15th of December i.e. your last day of employment ...


4

Seems like you are mentally checked out from the company and moved on, which is even more reasons to have that discussion with your current boss. Explain that you just want to move on, asap, and ask how this can be facilitated. Usually, that means compiling a list of things that need to be delivered, and after that, the company can just let you go. In the ...


2

Check with your employer, but almost certainly Friday.


5

Am I acting within my rights? Partially, I believe you're using company resources (email) to organise a meeting outside of the company to discuss company issues crosses a line. That's not to say you're not free to meet with whom ever you please outside of work for whatever purpose but if you organised it from company email (to or from) then IMHO that's not ...


0

The best action a disgruntled employee who can secure another employment can do is to leave. This is not the only the best choice for the employee, but also the best way said an employee can cause pain to the business. After you leave, you find better work, and then you are in a position to help your former co-workers move to the better company with you (...


1

I am young, unattached, dependent-less and work in a rapidly growing field. I have no concerns about job security If this is true, then your best course of action is to look for a new company to work for where HR and management will actually listen to feedback from their employees and that their employees do not feel that "nothing would happen" if they ...


1

There are two sides of the issue here. You have identified one - It's easy for you to insult people. There's also the second side - people can be insulted quite easily... As there are two sides of the issue there are two sides to work on the solution as well! For me, it's easier to control myself when I feel secure and there is acceptable level of stress. ...


1

There are already a couple of great answers, and I agree with the books @Richard Says Reinstate Monica recomments, especially Dale Carnegie's "How to win friends and influence people". I have found it very helpful myself. I was struck by this But most of the time I make a mental note not to make remark/joke like that and not do that specific bit again. ...


1

This answer might be a bit controversial, but as someone who used to have a similar issue (and still has to some extent), I think it's better to put people in an environment where they fit in, rather than trying to make them fit in an ill-suited environment. I see you are trying to go from contracting work to full-time employed under a company. I think that ...


2

I'd like to come at this from a slightly different angle, which is that rudeness isn't only about the words, but also about the intent behind those words. What's your attitude to your colleagues, deep down?  Do you find them intelligent, or do you privately think they're a bit stupid?  Do enjoy being around them, or is that something you endure for the sake ...


1

I don't know if this is a feasible solution, but have you considered removing yourself from the situation? I do kind of the same thing you do, though it sounds like to a lesser degree. People don't always understand my sense of humour, and some of my comments, while I think they're, at worst, sarcastic, others find them hurtful and insensitive. What I've ...


2

Maybe this helps: I used to work with someone who sounds, perhaps, a bit like you. Very good technically, very competent, actually very well-meaning, but often would say things that took your breath away a bit. In his case, I think it was a language barrier. His approach, which worked, was that when he found out he said something inadvertently offensive, he ...


11

Have you tried turning this into a game? Changing your habits is difficult and is likely to require a significant amount of concentration. Turning the challenge into a game can be an effective way to improve concentration. You should consult your manager or a friend before attempting the following: In your shoes I'd be inclined to seek the help of my ...


56

I am on the autism spectrum (aspergers syndrome) and I can relate. I was almost unemployable for a while. Here's what I did, maybe it can help you. The best way to help yourself is to create new scripts for yourself. I highly recommend the following books How to win friends and influence people, by Dale Carnegie The Hard Truth About Soft Skills: ...


6

You’re coming in from a technical background where facts rule, and the rules on how to tell a computer what to do is well defined (eg programming language), and if you didn’t handle something appropriately, the computer will tell you what you did wrong (eg error messages, exceptions, unexpected results). That’s a pretty well defined rule set and it’s pretty ...


-7

I know this probably isn't the answer you are looking for, but my background is in restaurant management and I am currently working on getting up to speed in the tech world/development and cybersec. People are often times too sensitive, too easily offended, and don't take jokes or comments the way they might be intended. My reason for mentioning being a ...


8

The thing that strikes the most in your post is: and eventually, I will, in a few weeks, make another remark This suggest that you have an issue with learning acceptable professional interpersonal behavior. The fact that this has been going on for years means that this issue is engrained and need long time to fix. On professional level, you should learn ...


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